Download Cut fb2

by Patricia McCormick
Download Cut fb2
Literature & Fiction
  • Author:
    Patricia McCormick
  • ISBN:
    1886910618
  • ISBN13:
    978-1886910614
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Front Street imprint of Boyds Mills Press; 1 edition (October 30, 2000)
  • Pages:
    176 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Literature & Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1191 kb
  • ePUB format
    1220 kb
  • DJVU format
    1925 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    122
  • Formats:
    mobi mbr docx txt


Patricia McCormick (born May 23, 1956) is an American journalist and writer of realistic fiction for young adults. She has twice been a finalist for the National Book Award. McCormick graduated from Rosemont College in 1974–1978

Patricia McCormick (born May 23, 1956) is an American journalist and writer of realistic fiction for young adults. McCormick graduated from Rosemont College in 1974–1978. McCormick earned an MS from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism in 1985–1986 and an MFA from the New School in 1999. She currently lives in New York City.

First-timer McCormick tackles a side of mental illness that is rarely seen in young-adult literature in a believable and sensitive manner. A thoughtful look at teenage mental illness and recovery.

Cut, Patricia McCormick. 1st ed. p. cm. Summary: While confined to a mental hospital, thirteen-year-old Callie. slowly comes to understand some of the reasons behind. her self-mutilation, and gradually starts to get better. 2. Emotional problems-Fiction.

CUT is an amazing first novel by Patricia McCormick that offers a glimpse inside the mind of a 15-year-old girl who cuts herself. For Callie, life just became too complicated

CUT is an amazing first novel by Patricia McCormick that offers a glimpse inside the mind of a 15-year-old girl who cuts herself. For Callie, life just became too complicated. The solution lay right in front of her.

Never too deep, never enough to die. But enough to feel the pain. From the acclaimed author of Cut comes this new novel that explores the anguish of living with divided loyalties and the cost of keeping family secrets, as a young teen struggles to keep his family together when his father abandons them.

Patricia McCormick, a two-time National Book Award finalist, is the author of several critically acclaimed books: SOLD, Cut, Never Fall .

Patricia McCormick, a two-time National Book Award finalist, is the author of several critically acclaimed books: SOLD, Cut, Never Fall Down Cut, Never Fall Do. Also included is information about Author Visits. I talk about some of the issues that may concern parents about my visits, and how I respond to those.

National Book Award Finalist Patricia McCormick has written a visceral and compelling portrait of life in a war zone, where loyalty is valued above all, and death is terrifyingly commonplace. National Book Award Finalist Patricia McCormick has written a visceral and compelling portrait of life in a war zone, where loyalty is valued above all, and death is terrifyingly commonplace. 172. Published: 2009. Although Lakshmi's family is desperately poor her life still contains simple pleasures; but, when the harsh Himalayan monsoons wash away all the family’s crops, Lakshmi’s stepfather sends her away to take a job to support her family.

Patricia McCormick, a two-time National Book Award finalist, is the author of five critically acclaimed novels: Never Fall . McCormick grew up in central Pennsylvania.

Patricia McCormick, a two-time National Book Award finalist, is the author of five critically acclaimed novels: Never Fall Down, a novel based on the true story of an 11-year-old boy who survived the Killing Fields of Cambodia by playing music; Purple Heart, a suspenseful psychological novel that explores the killing of a 10-year-old boy in Iraq; Sold, . She worked as an assistant press secretary to the Governor of Pennsylvania from 1974-78, then went to the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. McCormick studied fiction writing at The New School in New York City.

Patricia McCormick, New York. This reader said Cut by Patricia McCormick is something she could "relate to beyond words. Patricia McCormick, a two-time National Book Award finalist, is the author of five critically acclaimed books. 31 Mayıs 2016, 13:13 ·.

Fifteen-year-old Callie isn't speaking to anybody, not even her therapist at Sea Pines, the "residential treatment facility" where her parents and doctor sent her after discovering that she cuts herself. As her story unfolds, Callie reluctantly becomes involved with the "guests" at Sea Pines--other young women struggling with problems of their own, Although their "issues" are different from hers, Callie is drawn into the group, finds her voice, and, gradually, confronts the family trauma that triggered her destructive behavior. Cut is a compelling and compassionate look at a young woman's struggle to overcome the impulses that led her to inflict harm on herself.

Ttyr
I recently went through a bad spat of depression and cut some so when I found this book, I was "over-joyed" and thought that it might help in some way. What it turned out to be though was basically the "memoirs" of a teenage girl in a psychiatric hospital. It offered to help at all and I found myself quickly getting bored with it. Since it failed for the primary reason I got it, I decided to treat it as another book. The characters have very little back story to them and the scenes in the book feel, off, somehow. When I finished reading the book, I felt like I had only read a normal books chapter. It felt over way to quick and left the story kind of just hanging. Overall, this book failed to help me and fell short of expectations for a recreational book also.
Gann
Cutting and the associated mutism of the main character are serious topics. They require more in-depth explanation and discussion of the possible reasons and solutions for the behaviors. There was very little plot or character development and it was not a deep or particularly well written book. The size of the book alone should have been an indicator that the complex world of cutting simply cannot be defined or even remotely touched upon in such a limited context. I was guided to this book as an alternative suggestion to Go Ask Alice for a 14 year old girl. I will not be buying Cut for her. Alice has more soul.
Tyler Is Not Here
I feel like it really had a great concept and the first half was really intriguing. However, it was just not deep enough. Cutting is a very complex idea and i feel like this was a watered down version of the concept (Good for high school or 8th grade readers). Really stunk that it ended the way it did, although hopeful, it didn't carry out the page turner effect through the whole book. I was really disappointed i spent so much of the day hoping it would get better.
Na
This was a great book. I could closely relate to the main character because I have done self-harm for about 20 years. The story line was great and very relatable. I've always enjoyed books that give you an inside look to the lives of those in a mental health facility setting.
I would recommend this book to those that are not easily triggered by the topics included in here, such as self-harm, anorexia/bulimia or suicide.
For those who are triggered by these things, please read with caution and seek help from a mental health provider, a trusted family member or close friend who understands your issues.
Unirtay
Cut is McCormick's first novel and was inspired by a 1997 New York Times article about self-mutilation. McCormick told Elizabeth Devereuax in an article in Publishers Weekly that she "keep the article for months, then I finally threw it away. I didn't know why I was saving it." Later, during an exercise for a writing workshop at the New School, "I found myself writing in the voice of a little girl, addressing her shrink in a loony bin. I thought, Where does this come from? I finally traced it back. So I closed up my computer and got hold of that article again. And from there I could not stop writing the book."

She spent three years researching and writing the book. "The phenomenon of girls cutting themselves in secret," she tells in an interview on her publisher's website, [...] "both repulsed and fascinated me. . . I started out reading everything I could about cutting, although at the time there wasn't much written and there was only one young adult novel on the topic. . . After I finished the first draft of the book, I went to S.A.F.E. (Self-Abuse Finally Ends) and amazing facility that treats people who self-injure. . . to my surprise almost every detail was exactly like those I'd imagined in my book!"

Cut was an ALA Quick Pick for YA Readers and a NYPL Book for the Teen Age.

I really liked the book Cut and thought it was the best out of the three cutting novels that I read for this project. (The other two were Crosses by Shelley Stoehr and Tribes by Arthur Slade). Callie is a sympathetic character with a unique voice. The book doesn't get bogged down with too much psycho-babble as some problem-novel books can. Rather, the focus remains on Callie and her struggle to make peace with her emotions without resorting to self-injury.

Yes, her problems may have been less severe than may others who cut because of a post-traumatic stress disorder, or sexual abuse, or physical abuse, but I think her problems are more approachable to the reader because they're not glamorous or sensationalized. Young Adults trying to carve their way through peer pressures, getting into college, and studying for SATs, can all relate to her difficulties.

Reading about something does not make you do it. Reading about running a marathon doesn't make you go out and run one. Reading about bullying doesn't make you a bully. Reading about cutting does not make you cut.

Or in other words, as Callie's therapist in Cut very eloquently says on page 126:

"Callie. . . There are all kinds of things in the world you could use to hurt yourself. All kinds of things you can turn into weapons. Even if you wanted to give them all to me, it wouldn't be possible. You know that, don't you?"

I do know that, I guess. I nod.

"I can't keep you safe," you say. "Only you can."
Wat!?
I recieved this book from my wishlist. I added it in the hopes that the book was about SI, but I discovered that the title is quite misleading and that the book never truly confronts the issue of self-mutilation. Subtract three pints of water and you might have a truly gripping book, but as is, it might be good for those who have never had problems with SI or those who don't know much about it.
I've been injuring myself for 4 years now, and I won't lie, the book does some hold some truth. The mannerisms of the two characters who cut are quite realistic, but any instances where they are actually cutting are vaguely written...almost looked over, zoomed past too quickly so that the reader never really gets an idea of what it feels like.
This book would've been better off written by an SIer. Though the reader is placed in an interesting point of view and the book shoots down a topic that's all too glorified among young adults, this reads a lot like a PBS After-School Special, with a cheesy and cliched ending that came way too soon.
Wenyost
I've read this numerous times, mostly in school. Shockingly, it helped my mental state on more than one occasion and I appreciate that. Thank you for writing this Patricia McCormick. You have a way with words.