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by Linda Sue Park
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Literature & Fiction
  • Author:
    Linda Sue Park
  • ISBN:
    0613573277
  • ISBN13:
    978-0613573276
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Turtleback Books; Bound for Schools & Libraries ed. edition (January 10, 2011)
  • Subcategory:
    Literature & Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1278 kb
  • ePUB format
    1179 kb
  • DJVU format
    1198 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    941
  • Formats:
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Binding: School & Library Binding. Book Condition: Good. For use in schools and libraries only.

Binding: School & Library Binding. Synopsis: For use in schools and libraries only. In this Newbery Medal-winning book set in 12th century Korea, Tree-ear, a 13-year-old orphan, lives under a bridge in Ch'ulp'o, a potters' village famed for delicate celadon ware. He has become fascinated with the potter's craft; he wants nothing more than to watch master potter Min at work, and he dreams of making a pot of his own someday.

School & Library Binding: 304 pages. Read or listen to every Bill Bryson book you can, especially the audiobooks for which he provides the narration. I have listened to this one no less than six times, and laugh at the dynamics between Bill and his hiking partner EVERY. I cannot hear the word, "Peachy" without thinking of this book.

by Linda Sue Park First published April 23rd 2001. Showing 1-30 of 43. A Single Shard (Paperback). Published February 11th 2003 by Yearling. Paperback, 192 pages.

Find nearly any book by Linda-Sue Park. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. ISBN 9781606868249 (978-1-60686-824-9) Perfection Learning, 2010.

Tree-ear picked up this piece and swished it through the water to rinse off the sand. He tied them into one corner of his tunic, then put the clay-bound shard into the pouch

Tree-ear picked up this piece and swished it through the water to rinse off the sand. Across one side of the shard ran a shallow groove, evidence of the vases melon shape. Part of an inlaid peony blossom with its stem and leaves twined along the groove. He tied them into one corner of his tunic, then put the clay-bound shard into the pouch. Holding the pouch clear of the boulders with one hand, he climbed back to the path. His every movement was quick with purpose; to hesitate was to doubt.

Book Description : FOR USE IN SCHOOLS AND LIBRARIES ONLY. Enjoy this beautiful companion book to the extensive Exploring Calvin and Hobbes exhibition at the Billy Ireland Cartoon Library. Includes an in-depth, original,and lengthy interview with Bill Watterson. Exploring Calvin and Hobbes is the catalogue for an exhibition by the same name at the Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum at Ohio State University that ran in 2014.

School & Library Binding published 1996-03-01 by Turtleback. Alert if: New Price below.

A Single Shard - Linda Sue Park.

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83 MB·9 Downloads·Turkish. TESE (AESS) - Avrupa Eğitim Sistemleri Sözlüğü. 07 MB·468 Downloads·Turkish.

FOR USE IN SCHOOLS AND LIBRARIES ONLY. In this Newbery Medal-winning book set in 12th century Korea, Tree-ear, a 13-year-old orphan, lives under a bridge in Ch'ulp'o, a potters' village famed for delicate celadon ware. He has become fascinated with the potter's craft; he wants nothing more than to watch master potter Min at work, and he dreams of making a pot of his own someday. When Min takes Tree-ear on as his helper, Tree-ear is elated - until he finds obstacles in his path: the backbreaking labor of digging and hauling clay, Min's irascible temper, and his own ignorance. But Tree-ear is determined to prove himself - even if it means taking a long, solitary journey on foot to present Min's work in the hope of a royal commission . . . even if it means arriving at the royal court with nothing to show but a single celadon shard.

interactive man
I bought this because my fifth grade grand son had to read it for school and he was telling me about the story. I'm a potter—we decided to share the story. This is well written with decent character development and a clear story arc. The factual information about pottery and the making of pottery is accurate and worked gracefully into the story line. The plot involves a young boy in ancient times who is trying to find his way through life as an orphan. He stumbles upon a community of master potters and becomes interested in their processes. The boy gets hired to do chores for one of the best potters, and finds a way to help his master vie for a place on the emperor's potting commission. It's an adventure, a story about building your self esteem and your skills, and a great story about commitment to others. I recommend this YA story for any age.
Mojar
As a parent who is thinking of this book in terms of what it would do for my son, I must say that there is quite a bit:

1. It's an interesting twist on a very old theme (the bildungsroman)
2. It has a lot of topics for further discussion
a. The history of Korea (multiple invasions, provincialism, and such);
b. A lot of good sayings to analyze and for further discussion ("Scholars read the great words of the world. But you and I must learn to read the world itself.")
c. Some good words to help build a youngster's vocabulary (spoor, celadon, lugubrious, kiln, slip)
d. Morals about life (What lesson could a child draw from Tree-ear's bad experience with the thieves and then his later good experience with the commisioner? What could a child learn about the *way* that Tree-ear went about learning the craft of pottery? What about the way that he was aware of his surroundings?)
e. Introduction of the concept of "intellectual property."

3. There is a good afterword that explains the historical context of the book (that may have been more for adults, but it was only a couple of pages long and so it wouldn't kill a reasonably intelligent child to try to read it).

4. The characterizations/ character development are very good. They are good at a level that both children AND adults can understand.

The whole book only takes about 3 hours to read (I read the whole thing in one afternoon at work while being forced to hold office hours) and the writing is so interesting that it's hard to put down.

Verdict: Worth the time. Worth the Kindle purchase price. Highly recommended.
Wanenai
A shard is a broken piece of pottery, and the boy and his mentor are broken shards of people. However, both of them retain enough of the design to continue their lives. This is a wonderful tale of an abandoned orphan growing up with a cast aside crippled man in ancient Korea. Daily survival is a first and very difficult skill for the boy to learn, and by accident he is introduced to a passionate interest and then he inveigles his way into an apprenticeship to learn from the master. The thought-provoking interpersonal relationships among the four characters, the hard lessons of patience for the boy, the developing sense of honor and lessons learned for both young and old in this low-key adventure story make it a tale to remember.
Cemav
It seems to me that Park's books are written much like fables, with each chapter, each episode drawn with poignant but concise brush strokes. Sometimes, as with "Long Walk to Water," this doesn't work too well; there just isn't enough in whole to support full-blooded characters. Here, this writing style serves her - and all of us - excellently. As elsewhere, she dips in, she dips out. But here, with each emersion, she beautifully captures the essence of the time (so long ago!), the place (so mysterious and yet intimate), the story (plenty captivating) and most of all, the characters, especially Tree-ear. In about a hundred and fifty pages, she brings them all so fully alive and compelling. This is only one young man from a remote village on the other side of the earth, some 900 years ago. In a world where we might easily wonder if anything we ever do has any impact at all, we can see through this brief but powerful story that even in the smallest niche in time, the courage and perseverance and faith of a single person - without magic or histrionics - can truly make a difference. The story truly advances the Eastern philosophy that there are consequences to each and every act (each shard?) of man. I love this story at every level.
Zonama
I was first introduced to Linda Sue Park from reading her picture book to my son, "The Firekeepers Son". It was a great story, and meaningful. Later, we listened to her books in the 39 Clues series ("Trust No One", and "Storm Warning"). Her books are kind, and have a lot of vivid imagination. She wove in Korean culture, folk tales, art, and history in a way that made it all come alive. This book is well-researched and I love how it ties in real historical locations and objects. The characters in the book also demonstrate good values, such as friendship, caring, courage, taking responsibility. I also found one or two precious little tips how to deal with life. I suggested this book to my nine-year-old for his book report, and was pleasantly surprised that he enjoyed it so much he practically finished it in three sittings.
Kaghma
The reader is transported to ancient Korea and introduced to the demanding work required by the making of celadon pottery. It has been years since I have seen celadon, but the author's descriptions were so precise that I could see it in my mind's eye as clearly as if I had been holding a piece. I try to read all the books I give to my grandchildren, and I found this Newberry Award winning novel to be quite exceptional. Youngsters will be exposed to Korean culture and history as they read this engrossing and moving story about a 13-year-old orphan boy. Love, loyalty, honestly and perseverance are all themes of this slight volume. Relationships are thoughtfully, honestly explored and are at the heart of the story. As a former teacher and as a therapist, I recommend this book for youngsters in grades four through eight.