Download Blood Roses fb2

by Francesca Lia Block
Download Blood Roses fb2
Literature & Fiction
  • Author:
    Francesca Lia Block
  • ISBN:
    0060763841
  • ISBN13:
    978-0060763848
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    HarperTeen; Reprint edition (June 1, 2008)
  • Pages:
    129 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Literature & Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1597 kb
  • ePUB format
    1519 kb
  • DJVU format
    1393 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    635
  • Formats:
    mobi doc mobi doc


Blending fantasy with reality, most of the characters in these short, short stories are young girls who live on the west coast of the United States

Blending fantasy with reality, most of the characters in these short, short stories are young girls who live on the west coast of the United States. The tone and occasional reappearance of characters, from earlier stories in the text, result in a tight focus of mood and moment.

Francesca Lia Block (born December 3, 1962) is an American writer of adult and young-adult literature: fiction, short stories, screenplays and poetry.

Francesca Lia Block takes the hellish insecurity of being a teenager and gives those anxieties physical form: this is a world where fairies, vampires and aliens lurk at the edges of the Southern California setting. Unlike some of her contemporaries, however, Block doesn’t use her fantasy to sugarcoat reality: these are gritty stories and better for it.

I read the entire book in an hour or so, and was entranced by the way Francesca Lia Block's poetic, yet sparse writing draws you into a world where magic is accepted, no matter how unexpected.

All of us passionate girls who fear crushing the boys we love with our mouths like caverns of teeth, our mushrooming brains, our watermelon hearts? What's real is what's imagined in nine tales of transformation by Francesca Lia Block. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

What shall we do, all of us? All of us passionate girls who fear crushing the boys we love with our mouths like caverns of teeth, our mushrooming brains, our watermelon hearts?

What shall we do, all of us? All of us passionate girls who fear crushing the boys we love with our mouths like caverns of teeth, our mushrooming brains, our watermelon hearts? What's real is what's imagined in nine tales of transformation by Francesca Lia Block. Download (pdf, 556 Kb) Donate Read. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF.

What shall we do, all of us? All of us passionate girls who fear crushing the boys we love with our mouths like caverns. All of us passionate girls who fear crushing the boys we love with our mouths like caverns of teeth, our mushrooming brains, our watermelon hearts? What's real is what's imagined in nine tales of transformation by Francesca Lia Block. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere. Publisher: HarperTeenReleased: Jul 1, 2008ISBN: 9780061732577Format: book. carousel previous carousel next. Love in the Time of Global Warming.

'Blood Roses' is reprinted from Firebirds Rising: An Anthology of Original Science Fiction and Fantasy, published in 2006 by Firebird, an imprint of Penguin Group (USA).

What shall we do, all of us?

All of us passionate girls who fear crushing the boys we love with our mouths like caverns of teeth, our mushrooming brains, our watermelon hearts?

What's real is what's imagined in nine tales of transformation by Francesca Lia Block.


Modimeena
In Blood Roses Francesca Lia Block does what she does well--writes evocatively, using poetic language to create a lush mood. Blending fantasy with reality, most of the characters in these short, short stories are young girls who live on the west coast of the United States. The tone and occasional reappearance of characters, from earlier stories in the text, result in a tight focus of mood and moment.

This works wonderfully in her novels but not quite so well in her short story collections. Because almost every story is told in the same voice, the stories barely stand out one from the other. Beautifully written, any one would stand out from another writer's short stories but it is hard to find one from this collection that stands out from the others.

Nevertheless, the images are so rich that it is hard to not recall them all as the protagonists from each story seek to find meaning. And Block, who is not afraid to address some of the more frightening aspects of adolescent reality, does so with a fairy tale elegance that cloaks the darkness in beautiful prose. In this, she is harkening back to the tradition of bedtime stories where children were taught to fear through stories. However, her stories are not meant to inspire fear but to offer healing of psychic and spiritual wounds.

So, although this is not my favorite of Block's many books, it is still superior to most young adult literature.
Wafi
The term most used to describe Block's writing is 'lyrical' and this certainly is. I had never read any of her stories before, and loved this introduction to her style and subjects. All nine stories are centered around girls, some of which know each other, so they are loosely related, but can be read as stand-alones with no trouble.

I read the entire book in an hour or so, and was entranced by the way Francesca Lia Block's poetic, yet sparse writing draws you into a world where magic is accepted, no matter how unexpected. Each character, from the ones in the title story about two sisters, to the one whose body erupts in torturingly beautiful tatoos--grows from the fantastic experiences they encounter.

Overall, a good, quick read for those that enjoy fantasy and don't mind a deeply romantic perspective. Wonderful.
Kesalard
This book is clearly meant for 9-13 year olds. Im 22. But I love her writing, so thought Id check it out. That said this book almost seems like an outline. Each story is pretty literal which leads to its blandness overall. As for the overlapping stories, Im very used to this motif in her writing so it wasn't anything memorable. Like one reviewer said the boys were a lot more interesting than the girls, but all the stories surround the girls. My favorite stories were "Blood Roses" and "My boyfriend is an Alien" Those two seemed to deal with something a lot deeper than just the reality of how boys act or girl transistion. Wouldn't recommend this to those who aren't fans.
Andromathris
Ms. Block's books are never heavy reads, but always enjoyable. They take me to a whole other place, filled with technicolour, magic, and her unique, poetic vernacular. I can't say they were very erotic, but still very beautiful. I liked how all the stories interconnected too; my favourite was the story about Berry.
In these stories you don't know what is real and what is fantasy... when I think it's both. Blending the two together is what Fransesca does best.
Marad
The book is exactly what I was expecting it to be. Hardcover, and in fantastic condition. I have already read it and I'm glad I bought it.
Dellevar
Not bad, not great. Most of the stories are pretty forgettable. Maybe I've just gotten too old for this author.
Tane
I love this book. I always have. I recommend it to people with feelings. It really makes you think and takes you places. It's beautifully written. Francesca is amazing.
This short story collection always makes me sing the Tori Amos song of the same name when I pick it up.

A collection of magical/fairy-tale-esque stories of transformation, this is the usual adjective bath by Ms. Block. It's odd because I usually prefer books with strong characterization and Block's books seem to be more about concept--especially in her short fiction. In the first story--the title story, "Blood Roses," I found myself randomly crying over a poignant paragraph: "She wondered if when you died it was like that. If you still believed your body was there and couldn't quite accept that it was gone. Or if someone you loved died, someone you were really close to, would they be like a phantom limb, still attached to you?"

Mythical references popped up regularly--as soon as I saw Lucy and Rosie being offered pomegranate juice in a strange man's house, I smelled Persephone--and the dark and sort of creepy side of magic is found under every rock here. I got a little tired of the random insertions of "Here's this character, she looks like this, she does this glamorous thing and wears this other glamorous thing and she has a cool name. Now here's this character. . . ." In a way, depending on my mood, it kind of strikes me like sifting through random people's snapshots, so it's interesting, but usually when I'm reading a book I don't want to get attached to a snapshot and then have her not become a person.

Block also has a bit of a habit of ending stories abruptly when it seemed like they were building toward something. I don't insist on resolution, but I do like when they go somewhere and many of these stories went somewhere but stopped before they got there. My favorite stories were "My Boyfriend is an Alien" (in which a girl with schizophrenia describes her boyfriend and why she thinks he is from space) and "Skin Art" (in which Elodie Sweet falls in love with an older man with tattoos, but when he won't even consider her love because she's a minor, tattoos start appearing all over her skin until she desperately goes to him and demands his attention . . . once she gets it, a really accurate statement about love is narrated poignantly, and I really appreciated how it did not downplay the depth of Elodie's feelings while also acknowledging that they were not love).