Download The Blue Lawn fb2

by William Taylor
Download The Blue Lawn fb2
Literature & Fiction
  • Author:
    William Taylor
  • ISBN:
    1555834930
  • ISBN13:
    978-1555834937
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Alyson Books; 1st Alyson edition (May 1, 1999)
  • Pages:
    128 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Literature & Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1796 kb
  • ePUB format
    1546 kb
  • DJVU format
    1119 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    278
  • Formats:
    doc mbr docx rtf


William Taylor has managed to write a sensitive, powerful book that depicts the angst . I loved the symbolism of the blue lawn as well as the character of Gretel, a Holocaust survivor who could have had a book of her own.

William Taylor has managed to write a sensitive, powerful book that depicts the angst and confusion of teenage love in a completely believeable way. The book moves along at a lightning pace and the characters are realistic, enjoyable and three dimensional. New Zealand grammar takes a couple of pages to get used to but what he has managed to accomplish in little more than a 100 pages is truly remarkable. Taylor's prose is tight, clean and powerful.

David is 15 and the star player of his school's rugby team. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem.

Homosexuality - Fiction, Coming of age - Fiction, New Zealand - Fiction. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Alethea Bowser on February 13, 2012. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

The Treachery of the Blue Books or Treason of the Blue Books (Welsh: Brad y Llyfrau Gleision) was the publication in 1847 of the three-volume Reports of the commissioners of enquiry into the state of education in Wales, which caused uproar in Wales . .

Author: William Boyd. The small blue sign was only slightly marred by the blunt erasure of my ex-partner’s name-no more Eric Meyersen-a simple stripe of black paint obscuring his identity. I wished I could obliterate as easily the memories of our association: Meyersen and Fischer, five years of lies and duplicity, of cheating and bad faith.

William Brockenbrough Taylor Jr. (born September 14, 1947) is an American diplomat, government official, and former soldier, who served as the 6th United States ambassador to Ukraine 2006 to 2009 and as acting ambassador to Ukraine from June 2019 t. (born September 14, 1947) is an American diplomat, government official, and former soldier, who served as the 6th United States ambassador to Ukraine 2006 to 2009 and as acting ambassador to Ukraine from June 2019 to January 2020. Taylor is a former captain and company commander in the United States Army; he served in the Vietnam War and earned a Bronze Star and an Air Medal with a V device for valor

Top of the range are Taylor lawn bowls, leaders in the sport. You can bowl with precision and character. Constantly evolving and keeping innovation alive, Taylor lawn bowls use the latest bowling technology. If you want to get really serious, also check out the lawn bowls clothing and lawn bowls shoes.

Knitwits and The Blue Lawn were adapted for the stage. Knitwits, Numbskulls, and Hark: The Herald Angel were adapted for audiocassette, Word Pictures Ltd. (Auckland, New Zealand). SIDELIGHTS: Since beginning his second career as a writer, New Zealander William Taylor has authored over three dozen books, many of them novels for both children and adults.

William Taylor was the man behind children's classics such as Possum Perkins and The Worst Socer Team Ever, and young adult fiction including The Blue Lawn and Jerome. He died in Taumarunui on Saturday, aged 77. Taylor was born in Lower Hutt but Raurimu, near the Tongariro National Park, was his "beloved home", a memorial notice said. He was described as a "writer of books, teacher of hundreds, tireless worker for the community". So ends a life in writing, no more telling tales, but you can still read them today

A fifteen-year-old boy acknowledges his attraction to an older rugby teammate, as he also begins to break out of the preconceived notions his family and others have about him.

in waiting
This is one of the better books I've read on the subject of coming out, aimed at a young adult audience. But that's not saying much. I think a kid who is struggling with his (or her) identity would be better off reading and 'adult' book like Edmund White's gorgeous "The Beautiful Room is Empty". The writing is what elevates this book to better than average. The plot is fairly typical. A young, gifted athlete (why are they always athletes?) discovers his attraction to another boy is mutual. At first they don't discuss this attractions; instead sublimating with fast driving, wrestling, and a hunting expedition. The author began to lose me when, after the boys confront each other with their feelings, they remain incredibly chaste, even during mutual showers and nights spent in the same bed, half-nude. They learn to sublimate their sexual feelings by long runs followed by the aformentioned showers. The main character, David, while seemingly less worldy then Theo, seems willing. He is physically more powerful than Theo, more imaginative, and at times more persuasive in his arguments so it isn't too big a stretch to imagine him finding away to gently force the issue. Theo, who seems to have little control over his other appetites; smoking, drinking, fast driving; has remarkable self-control when it comes to sex. Naturally, this is a young adult book and the author has to be fairly discreet but one has to suspend their disbelief a bit far to accept that with all their opportunities (they are left alone for the weekend on more than one occasion) they don't even kiss.
Also, with such a short novel, short even by young adult standards, the author should have concentrated on one storyline; that of the two boys and their developing relationship. The side story of Gretel, Theo's grandmother, was distracting and out-of-place, having little bearing on what was happening between the boys. At the end, when we learn about her tragic past, it seems rushed, a device to shed some light on Theo's behavior, as well as her own. The author got so caught up in this character that he lost sight of his readers. I picked up this book in the hopes of reading an engaging story of two teenage boys discovering the joys, the heartaches, and the thrills of first love. Instead, I found myself growing impatient when at times Theo seemed to be a third wheel in the friendship between David and Gretel. I can't imagine the average teenage reader will have more patience for this than I. Perhaps the author should have saved Gretel's story for a different kind of book.
Ultimately, Theo is just too undeveloped a character. The reader is first introduced to him as a rebel who cares little for what others think of him. Very quickly the author seems to run out of steam when it comes to delving any deeper into Theo's motivations. His rebelliousness seems to be mere bravado; a pose. He initiates contact with David by making a rather brazen proposition on the second page of the book. Later, when he confesses his terror at the prospect of being gay for the rest of his life it doesn't ring true. Up until then he has seemed to sure of himself and of his ultimate success at hooking up with David. The far less worldly David instinctively realizes that there are strength in numbers when he confides in Theo, " It doesn't seem quite so bad when we're together. When we get to see each other and be together." This isn't out of keeping with David's character. Early in the book, he quits rugby after coming to the realization he is playing for the wrong reasons. He consistantly shows himself to be a young man unwilling to be untrue to himself. He has spent a great deal of time getting used to the idea even to the point of examing himself all over and concluding that he is not different from other boys accepting who he is attracted to. He has few illusions about who he is attracted to and is ready to accept it as long as he has love. In David, the author proves he can write a believable and consistant character so it is a mystery why he didn't work a little harder to flesh out Theo. The grandmother is a more fully realized character than Theo. One never has any doubts what motivates her behavior. She too is one with very little illusions about herself. I believe the author's intentions were good in developing Gretel the way he did; her horrible past is meant to provide insight to Theo's character and at the same time provide a bit of a moral lesson about hate which is clearly meant as a plea for tolerance for the young gay protaganists. As a message device is was handled far less clumsily then most young adult authors manage. Unfortunately, the author relies to heavily on our acceptance that Theo's personality has been shaped soley by the reality of Gretel's past. While it would surely have some bearing on Theo's character, too much is left out. When David confronts Theo, demanding to know why he hasn't been told about Gretel's past, accusing him of not caring, Theo retorts, "What the hell d'you mean? It is me. That is what I am. She is what I am. That, and more besides. Stuff she hasn't told you, might never tell you." We do learn the rest of the story, but not until the penultimate page of the book. While Gretel's revelation does provide some insight into Theo's character, it merely leaves one wondering why the author chose to clue us in at the end, when it doesn't really matter any more, at least not to the reader, and after all, who is the book for if not the reader?
Kazimi
David is the star of his school's rugby team and he is famous throughout his New Zealand community for being so. But gradually he's discovered that rugby isn't something he's really interested and as is natural he needs to painfully pull himself out of that role in the community. At the same time he is doing this he meets Theo, a mysterious newcomer to the community. There is an unspoken bond between the boys from when they meet and a gradual friendship is created. Theo is extroverted, rebellious against adults and blunt in trying to bring issues to the forefront whilst concealing aspects of his identity and feelings he finds hard to vocalize. Green-thumbed David is the opposite, a good boy who always does as he should and gets along with adults, but who is able to insist on what he needs to make him happy. It's interesting the ways these boys are shown to come together from different parts of society to form a romantic relationship that neither of them fully understand. It is a relationship which proves through various tests to be a lasting one.
This novel is beautifully written. It never fully tells what the boys relationship is because it is in a slow process of formation. It isn't a representation of a typical coming out story or gay discovery, but a unique discovery of new sexual feelings for two sharply drawn individuals. It seems strange at times that for hormonal boys of their age there is no realisation throughout the narrative of their sexual feelings, but this is explained to be because they literally don't know what to do yet. The presence of Theo's grandmother sometimes distracts from the main story of the boy's budding relationship, though she is an interesting enough character that seems to be crying for a story in her own right. This is a very lovingly told, nice tale that explores how "normal" boys adjust to new aspects of their identity.
Cordalas
William Taylor has managed to write a sensitive, powerful book that depicts the angst and confusion of teenage love in a completely believeable way. The book moves along at a lightning pace and the characters are realistic, enjoyable and three dimensional. New Zealand grammar takes a couple of pages to get used to but what he has managed to accomplish in little more than a 100 pages is truly remarkable.
I loved the symbolism of the blue lawn as well as the character of Gretel, a Holocaust survivor who could have had a book of her own. Taylor's prose is tight, clean and powerful. His economy of words makes for a fast read. Maybe too fast. I would have loved another 500 pages!
The book is not explicit and suitable for young readers as well as adults who remember what it was like to be young and in love! I can't say enough good things about this book!
Monin
Remember the first time you fell in love? This book takes you back to those feelings in the pit of your stomach. You are able to leave through the two main teenagers in this book. This book is directed more to the teenage coming out readers.

I enjoyed the read but did not like the ending because it left it open. Also it is written with the England wording so you are aware. I would have approached the reading a little different in my head. All in all you laugh and you cry and you hurt right along with the kids. If you have ever came out you will understand every feeling. The author does a great job of capturing the true path and emotions of this huge event.