» » Decelerate Blue

Download Decelerate Blue fb2

by Adam Rapp,Mike Cavallaro
Download Decelerate Blue fb2
Literature & Fiction
  • Author:
    Adam Rapp,Mike Cavallaro
  • ISBN:
    1596431091
  • ISBN13:
    978-1596431096
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    First Second; First edition (February 14, 2017)
  • Pages:
    208 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Literature & Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1571 kb
  • ePUB format
    1418 kb
  • DJVU format
    1111 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    137
  • Formats:
    mbr txt txt doc


From revolutionary and award-winning playwright Adam Rapp and veteran cartoonist and animator Mike Cavallaro comes Decelerate Blue, a dark, breath-taking new vision of an all-too-plausible future for America.

From revolutionary and award-winning playwright Adam Rapp and veteran cartoonist and animator Mike Cavallaro comes Decelerate Blue, a dark, breath-taking new vision of an all-too-plausible future for America. Comic and Graphic Books Science Fiction Young Adult Fiction. Adam Rapp is a novelist, playwright, screenwriter, and filmmaker. Rapp is the author of several young adult novels, including Missing the Piano, The Buffalo Tree, and 33 Snowfish More about Adam Rapp. Mike Cavallaro (Author).

is counter-productive, is recruited into a resistance movement where the mode of survival is taking thing. low. Genre: Young Adult Fantasy. Similar books by other authors. The Poet X Elizabeth Acevedo. Matched (Matched, book 1) Ally Condie. The Harlem Hellfighters Max Brooks. Scored Lauren McLaughlin.

From revolutionary and award-winning playwright Adam Rapp and veteran cartoonist and animator Mike Cavallaro comes Decelerate Blue, a dark, breath-taking new vision of an all-too-plausible future for America

From revolutionary and award-winning playwright Adam Rapp and veteran cartoonist and animator Mike Cavallaro comes Decelerate Blue, a dark, breath-taking new vision of an all-too-plausible future for America. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere. Publisher: Macmillan PublishersReleased: Feb 14, 2017ISBN: 9781250155108Format: book. carousel previous carousel next.

Written by Adam Rapp; illustrated by Mike Cavallaro . Mike Cavallaro’s comics include Parade (with fireworks), a Will Eisner Award-nominee; The Life and Times of Savior 28, with Eisner Award-winning writer . DeMatteis; and the Foiled series with Jane Yolen. Mike is an instructor at the School of Visual Arts and is the Vice-Chairman of the Manhattan Chapter of the National Cartoonists Society.

item 5 Decelerate Blue by Cavallaro, Mike, Rapp, Adam, NEW Book, FREE & Fast Delivery, -Decelerate Blue by Cavallaro . Mike Cavallaro is from New Jersey and has worked in comics and animation since the early 1990s.

item 5 Decelerate Blue by Cavallaro, Mike, Rapp, Adam, NEW Book, FREE & Fast Delivery, -Decelerate Blue by Cavallaro, Mike, Rapp, Adam, NEW Book, FREE & Fast Delivery, £1. 5. His comics include Parade (with fireworks) (Shadowline/Image Comics), a Will Eisner Award-nominee, The Life and Times of Savior 28 (IDW), with Eisner Award-winning writer . DeMatteis, The Foiled series with Jane Yolen, Decelerate Blue with author Adam Rapp, and the upcoming graphic novel, Vulcan's Celestial Supply Shop, all for First Second Books.

In this week's episode, our comic critics discuss the dystopic sci-fi graphic novel Decelerate Blue, by Adam Rapp and Mike Cavallaro (published 2017 by First Second). The authors present a nightmarish world that bears far too close a resemblance to our own! Comics comix Decelerate Blue Adam Rapp Mike Cavallaro dystopia scifi.

The book is 200+ pages long, mostly black and white with some color pages fo. .

I have the habit of doing this for First Second books, which are often in abundant supply in the graphic novel-centric public library space. The book is 200+ pages long, mostly black and white with some color pages for emphasis. The production quality of the book is lovely – it’s a paperback, but with French flaps, light blue gilding, and spot gloss embossing on the front cover. Most of the graphic novels First Second is working on right now fall firmly in the purview of YA; Decelerate Blue is targeted at 12-17 year old readers.

Adam Rapp writes and Mike Cavallaro draws the story of Angela, a.

All sentences end with the word go. That reference made me feel as though I was too old for the book, since I knew more history than I was intended to. It’s an appealing fantasy, that a group of drop-outs could build their own secret society, but it’s so unlikely as to not fit in well with the science fiction backing of the setting.

The future waits for no one.

In this new world, speed and efficiency are everything, and the populace zooms along in a perpetually stimulated haze. Angela thinks she's the only person in her family―maybe the only person on the planet―who sees anything wrong with this picture. But the truth is she's not alone.

Angela finds herself recruited into a resistance movement where the key to rebellion is taking things slow. In their secret underground hideout, they create a life unplugged from the rapid-fire culture outside. Can they free the rest of the world before the powers that be shut down their utopian experiment?

From revolutionary and award-winning playwright Adam Rapp and veteran cartoonist and animator Mike Cavallaro comes Decelerate Blue, a dark, breath-taking new vision of an all-too-plausible future for America.


Bearus
Decelerate Blue brings the popular dystopian YA genre of a young rebel finding her people to comics. Angela is a fifteen-year-old living in a world that emphasizes speed and hyper-consumption. All sentences end with the word “go”. Using too many adverbs will draw the wrong kind of attention. Everyone has a tracking chip implanted in their arm. Movies last under fifteen minutes.

But Angela has found a copy of the banned novel that suggests a different, slower way of life. She wants to live less rapidly, with more intention. Then she finds an underground (literally) resistance movement, where she falls in love.

The art is sparse and spiky, creating a sense of the tension Angela feels, but at times I wasn’t sure exactly what we supposed to be seeing, or the lack of background becomes distracting. Most of the book is black and white, but color is used sparingly to illustrate the most potent emotional moments.

I found the plot familiar, but that’s part of the appeal of a genre work, seeing the formula work itself out. My favorite parts were the small moments giving more insight into what day-to-day life is like, such as the one scene in Angela’s classroom. I wanted to know more about this world and how it came to be.

I suspect we’re supposed to identify with Angela, but there were times when I thought she seemed over-indulged. Teenage rebellion is natural, but that doesn’t make everything she dislikes bad. Except this is a rigged game, by the authors, so we’re supposed to think that going along is soul-crushing until you find the right group to fit in with.

It’s an appealing fantasy, that a group of drop-outs could build their own secret society, but it’s so unlikely as to not fit in well with the science fiction backing of the setting. I didn’t mind reading the first time through to find out what happened, but I don’t expect to read it again. Still, it’s an appealing message underneath, to slow down and appreciate art. (The publisher provided a digital review copy. Review originally posted at ComicsWorthReading.com.)
Coirad
Decelerate Blue is a pushback against fast food, timeclocks, and the need for speed.

The future imagined in Decelerate Blue is based on speed and efficiency. Poetic language has been removed from Shakespeare to make his plays quicker to read. People say Go when they are done expressing a thought so that a conversation will move more efficiently. Hyper is the preferred speed for everything. People are trained to save time by using contractions. Trials no longer exist because they get in the way of swift justice.

Angela Swiff is your basic rebellious 15-year-old girl. She rebels against the hyper world on general principles, but then she stumbles upon a rebel group that is dedicated to slowing down life. I’m all for that. She also discovers that she likes kissing girls. I’m all for that too.

I give Decelerate Blue points for creativity. The art slashes angrily across the page, and while nearly all of it is in black-and-white, color is used to strong effect in the final pages. Much of it the story told in wordless panels of art, which I always like to see in graphic storytelling. The story can’t be taken literally, but as a metaphor for challenging the corporate-fueled drive to live life at a faster, more productive pace (at the sacrifice of pleasure), the story is effective.
Castiel
Brought to you by OBS Reviewer Scott

“In a hyperkinetic future, the ultimate act of rebellion is slowing down” – Decelerate Blue Cover Blurb

Angela’s story, Decelerate Blue, is definitely that one of a few, handful of graphic novel s you would actually recommend to the non-graphic novel reading audience. It is a glimpse into a palatable future where one must maintain a higher heartrate; a frenetic pace with more productivity; where even speech is curtailed into terse, brevity that terminate with the word “go” in order to indicate the thought is terminated and another speaker can step in. A future that is ruled by mega-corporations, filled with mega-malls, where everything is sped up and everyone has a chip implanted inside their ulna (forearm bone). It is not really even conspiracy theory anymore; the devices (save the implants, which technically are available but not ethical) are available now: to check your pulse, to time your steps, to read more quickly, to wake you up to time your activity – it is not too difficult projecting twenty years in the future where everything will be faster paced. Perhaps not 12 minute movie fast (I mean could you even finish your popcorn by then?) but definitely more quickly than they are now. This is a future where even literature is done in condensed formats (the Reader’s Digest ™ Ultra-ultra-condensed versions).

The writing in Decelerate Blue, told from Angela’s point of view, is a variation in pacing. Two speeds are maintained: fast and slow; diametric opposites that tug and relax the reader’s attention. On the upside of human activity, it look at the spastic race of business people and apply this ‘ideology’ to everyday life. Banter, even between family members is not permitted and the writing relects this in short, terse sentences succeeded by the word “go.” It is a only slightly sped up world for some of us. Contractions are common (and required in the artificial society). In the underground, however, they’re trying to remove the chips, go off the grid, stop eating hasty-meals and have home cooked meals – where speech and dialogue is stretched out reflecting the slowed down pace. Contractions are avoided and writing take on a more philosophical tone. The dialogue is spot on. Angela’s voice is the conflicting voice of not being sure that she belongs in a sped up society and the comfort provided in slowing down, when she is accidentally gets dragged into the underground – even the music is slowed down, chanting slower, slower to the reader – absorb this, absorb this. The writing is excellent throughout and the plot is completely feasible (if you considered the chip your ID/biometrics machine). Rapp has the script nailed here and the reader is completely unprepared for the final pages.

Artistically, Cavallaro has interpreted the script masterfully. In the busy scenes the art becomes busy, if it is frenetic, the art reflects that. If it is slowed down in the underground, the art relaxes and you have time to absorb the small things, instead of the clutter of a hyper-modern lifestyle. Clean lines and panel flow grace this book, and it is easy on the eye and certainly not devoid of detail. Wherever the story takes you, the art takes you in hand, pushing and pulling with the aforementioned tugging and relaxing. It’s a rare synergy between art and word. Primarily black and white (to further slow your reading –black and white images are harder to ‘read’ than color ones) color only enters in the final few pages, where Angela makes a decisive choice that will change her life forever.

As I said before I would recommend this graphic novel to anyone, It is that fine of a work that it would appeal to almost everyone in today’s rat race, and gives healthy advice. Slow down, you are living but you are not enjoying life. Relax; smell the roses; take in a good book; watch that two-and-a-half hour movie; enjoy life. If this had been strictly a prose book, it would not have the impact. It is the complementary nature of the art and word that will truly push home the material discussed and impact the reader’s life.