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by Pauline Fisk
Download Telling the Sea fb2
Literature & Fiction
  • Author:
    Pauline Fisk
  • ISBN:
    0745920616
  • ISBN13:
    978-0732406554
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Chariot Victor Pub; First Edition edition (February 1, 1992)
  • Pages:
    240 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Literature & Fiction
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1518 kb
  • ePUB format
    1617 kb
  • DJVU format
    1322 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    899
  • Formats:
    lit rtf doc mbr


Clean, undamaged book with no damage to pages and minimal wear to the cover

Clean, undamaged book with no damage to pages and minimal wear to the cover.

Telling the Sea book. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Telling the Sea. by. Pauline Fisk.

Pauline Millicent Fisk (27 September 1948 – 25 January 2015) was a British children's author. Her 1990 book, Midnight Blue, was awarded the Nestlé Smarties Book Prize Gold award. In 1992, Fisk published her second book "Telling the Sea", set in the West Country. Fisk went on to publish "The Secret of Sabrina Fludde" (2002), "The Candle House" (1999), "The Red Judge" (2005), "Flying for Frankie" (2009) and "In the Trees" (2010) before her death in 2015.

Follows the fortunes of Nona, her mother and Nona's younger sister Sharon. The family runs away together to the seaside village in Wales which was the focus of Nona's mother's own childhood happiness. The author also wrote Midnight Blue, winner of the 1990 Smarties Prize.

When Zed finds himself caught up in an innocent prank with his sister which goes horribly wrong, his whole world falls apart. When Abren becomes conscious of her surroundings, she is struggling to get out of the flooded river Severn with her only possession, a beautifully embroidered cloth, clutched in her arms. What is she doing in the water, who is she, where can she go?

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FISK, Pauline 1948-PERSONAL: Born September 27, 1948, in London, England; daughter of Gordon and Millicent Fisk; married .

FISK, Pauline 1948-PERSONAL: Born September 27, 1948, in London, England; daughter of Gordon and Millicent Fisk; married David Davies (an architect), February 12, 1972; children: Nathaniel, Nancy, Beulah, Idris, Grace. Education: Attended Wimbledon County School for Girls, 1959-66. Religion: "Non-Conformist. PERSONAL: Born September 27, 1948, in London, England; daughter of Gordon and Millicent Fisk; married David Davies (an architect), February 12, 1972; children: Nathaniel, Nancy, Beulah, Idris, Grace.

Her 1990 book, Midnight Blue, was awarded the Nestlé Smarties Book Prize Gold award.

1948-09-27)27 September 1948. In 1992, Fisk published her second book "Telling the Sea", set in the West Country She was one of the writers on the children's animation series Lavender Castle.

On Nona's thirteenth birthday her unmarried mother retreats from reality by moving the family to the Welsh seaside village of her childhood holidays, forcing Nona to deal with eccentric neighbors, a new school, and the task of keeping the household from falling apart.On Nona's thirteenth birthday her unmarried mother retreats from reality by moving the family to the Welsh seaside village of her childhood holidays, forcing Nona to deal with eccentric neighbors, a new school, and the task of keeping the household from falling apart

Debeme
Telling the Sea is a beautifully written, sensitive portrayal of young teens struggling with difficult family circumstances and coming to terms with the issues in their lives in different ways.

Nona, her mum and her four brothers and sisters have run away from their old home and are hiding out on the wild Welsh coast, leaving behind Mum's abusive partner, Uncle Brady. They hope to start afresh, and fourteen year old Nona, the eldest of the brood--all from different fathers--does her best to make it work. But Mum is a little unstable and their new neighbour is nosy and aggressive, a bad combination.

She meets Owen, the local minister's son, who has his own problems--an overbearing father who wants to send him to a school Owen doesn't want to go to. But this isn't a romance. They get off to a bad start and do become friends but it goes no further than that.

The emphasis here is on the burden of responsibility laid on these young people by adults. Nona is expected to hold the family together when her mother falls apart--which she does in spectacular fashion--and Owen is expected to fulfil his father's expectations. The powerlessness that Nona and Owen feel at the circumstances of their lives is expertly expressed, and their way of trying to gain some control is very realistic for kids of that age. How many of us have run away from home at that age, or at least thought about it?

The book is populated with some colourful characters, all who leap off the page with vitality, and though many offer a helping hand to Nona, the only time she can truly open up and pour out her heart is to the sea. The sea is almost a character in its own right. It lures Nona deeper into its embrace as the story progresses and provides the setting for a powerful conclusion.

It's a skilfully crafted book. The character development is exemplary, the descriptions evocative and the plot and pacing keep you turning pages long after you should have turned out the light and gone to sleep. It's not just a book for teens, like all good young adult literature, there's a great deal of value in it as reading material for parents. They might learn something that would help them relate better to their kids.

I highly recommend this for all readers of literature both young and old.

You might also enjoy this film about the writing of 'Telling the Sea[...]: It introduces you to the setting of the book, and is exactly as I imagined it.
Voodoosida
This is a sensitively observed and beautifully written account of a family trying to escape and recover from domestic abuse. The portrait of the mother, her unwillingness to meet other people's eyes, her vulnerability, unreliability, closeness to breakdown is brilliantly done. Her troubles blight the lives of her children and for much of the novel it is the oldest daughter, Nona, the central character, who must play the adult role. In turn this affects the second daughter who feels neglected, disparaged and unloved. The three younger children are not as fully developed but even the passing description of the third child Poppy "a world weary, thumb-sucking, eight-year-old who'd moved house too many times" gives an indication of the sympathy and the honesty that underpins this story. Their mother has brought them, she hopes, to a safe place, a grubby, leaking, ill-lit summer holiday house in the Welsh winter. This is a location personally important to the author but in terms of the narrative it's less the place than the other residents of this small community who help the family pull though. They're a mixed bunch - the good the bad, the eccentric and the troubled. Not an ideal community by any means but definitely a community which is what the dislocated mother and her children so desperately need. It seemed a pity that they ever had to move away.
Anayaron
When Nona, her Mum, sisters and brothers flee to a remote village by the sea in Wales they think they have left all their troubles - including their abusive step-father Uncle Bradley - behind. But before long, not only have their own problems caught up with the family, but their lives have also become entangled with new friends with their own difficulties which need to be confronted and solved.
This is a thoroughly gripping and absorbing book which will keep you glued to each page - and a real bargain read for the price!