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by Julie Posner,Macon Fry
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United States
  • Author:
    Julie Posner,Macon Fry
  • ISBN:
    1565543378
  • ISBN13:
    978-1565543379
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Pelican Publishing; 2 edition (February 28, 1999)
  • Pages:
    512 pages
  • Subcategory:
    United States
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1297 kb
  • ePUB format
    1688 kb
  • DJVU format
    1252 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    832
  • Formats:
    lrf mobi lit lrf


Macon Fry and Julie Posner are freelance writers who live in New Orleans. Fry's features have appeared in publications including Louisiana Life, The Times-Picayune, and Gambit

Ships from and sold by kozybooks85. Macon Fry and Julie Posner are freelance writers who live in New Orleans. Fry's features have appeared in publications including Louisiana Life, The Times-Picayune, and Gambit. Ms. Posner is the creator of the Louisiana Festivals and Events Calendar and the Louisiana Festivals and Events Guidebook.

Cajun Country Guide book. And there are no better hunters than authors Macon Fry and Julie Posner.

Cajuns - Louisiana, Cajuns, Louisiana - Guidebooks, Louisiana. Sony Alpha-A6300 (Control).

There's just nowhere else but South Louisiana to find real knee-slapping, crowd-hooting Zydeco music. Even the big-city chefs can't cook up a Cajun meal the way they do at the roadside restaurants deep in the bayous of Acadiana. Likewise, no other guide matches the amount of in-depth information presented in Cajun Country Guide.

Explore Cajun Country holidays and discover the best time and places to visit Cajuns are the largest French-speaking minority in the USA, and while you may not hear French spoken at the grocery store, it's still .

Explore Cajun Country holidays and discover the best time and places to visit. When people think of Louisiana, this – and New Orleans – is the image that comes to mind: miles of bayou, sawdust-strewn shacks, a unique take on French and lots of good food. Welcome to Cajun Country, also called Acadiana for the French settlers exiled from L'Acadie (now Nova Scotia, Canada) by the British in 1755.

Stephen Fry in America. Photographs by Vanda Vucicevic. Having said that this book presumes to draw no conclusions, I will offer this: the overwhelming majority of Americans I met on my journey were kind, courteous, honourable and hospitable beyond expectation. Such striking levels of warmth, politeness and consideration were encountered not just in those I was meeting for on-camera interview, they were to be found in the ordinary Americans I met in the filling-stations, restaurants, hotels and shops too.

French fries, or simply fries (North American English), chips (British and Commonwealth English, Hiberno-English), finger chips (Indian English), or french-fried potatoes, are batonnet or allumette-cut deep-fried potatoes

French fries, or simply fries (North American English), chips (British and Commonwealth English, Hiberno-English), finger chips (Indian English), or french-fried potatoes, are batonnet or allumette-cut deep-fried potatoes. French fries are served hot, either soft or crispy, and are generally eaten as part of lunch or dinner or by themselves as a snack, and they commonly appear on the menus of diners, fast food restaurants, pubs, and bars

We started with an app of "Macon Bacon"; Hickory Smoked Bacon that hd been candied with a glaze of what tasted like cayenne and brown sugar . We love cajun food and it was good, but not quite like we are used to in NOLA. Menu has a nice selection, but a bit heavy for a lunch.

We started with an app of "Macon Bacon"; Hickory Smoked Bacon that hd been candied with a glaze of what tasted like cayenne and brown sugar, which you dipped into a peach preserve that had a touch of jalapeno in i.

My unofficial Cajun Country tour guide, Bill Thomas, has a particular reverence for the region’s history and its particular culinary treasure. Cajun people live off the land

My unofficial Cajun Country tour guide, Bill Thomas, has a particular reverence for the region’s history and its particular culinary treasure. Cajun people live off the land. From rice to pigs, everything the Cajuns grow is represented inside the casing of boudin, explains the Louisiana native. It’s so good you're gonna have to go home and change your jeans, adds Bill while driving past miles of rice fields and crawfish ponds, my college buddy and her mother chuckling in the back seat.

Country Guide, Winnipeg, Manitoba. The annual subscriptions have been bound into books. uide and nor-west farmer and country guide magazines. There is from 1940-1963 less one volume. Not sure where it went.

There's just nowhere else but South Louisiana to find real knee-slapping, crowd-hooting Zydeco music. Even the big-city chefs can't cook up a Cajun meal the way they do at the roadside restaurants deep in the bayous of Acadiana. Likewise, no other guide matches the amount of in-depth information presented in Cajun Country Guide. It's a study of Cajuns that tells visitors how to find the sights, sounds, and flavors of one of America's most culturally unique regions.

Take a vacation to a part of our own country that, in some places, didn't even speak English until nearly fifty years ago. While modern technology is weeding out some of the one-of-a-kind qualities of this subculture, not all of them are gone, or even hard to find, if you know how to hunt for them. And there are no better hunters than authors Macon Fry and Julie Posner.

With the handy maps, reviews, and recommendations packed into the Cajun Country Guide, a trip to the bayous won't leave one feeling like a visitor, but more like a native who has come back home.



Roram
Here's 450 pages dedicated to all things Acadiana. Another popular guide gives readers 350 pages for the entire state. Here you get 450 pages for the southern third of that state. Suffice to say that this book is rich in detail.

Cajun Country is one of the most culturally distinct regions in the United States, and here's a book that puts the spotlight firmly on it, rather than watering it down as an afterthought of New Orleans.

The introductory chapters cover various cultural topics before the book changes into a catalog of important sites, plantations, parks, restaurants, inns and swamp joints. There are very few (black and white) photographs, but it's not all that important because the text is thorough and insightful. There is a nice emphasis on historic and unique cultural sites. This is a book that oozes authenticity.

It's out of date, but that doesn't make the book useless. We all know that things of authenticity and quality tend to stick around... for a long time, and things move pretty darn slow in this part of the world. Most of the sites and listings in the book are still around today. Practical information is going to be inaccurate, so don't buy this book looking for e-mail addresses, business hours or the latest nightly room rates. Rather, use this book as a guide to feed your curiosity and to point you in the right direction. The authors obviously know this region well, and they indicate listings that deserve special attention with a star. Nice touch.

A new edition gets five stars, easily.
Clonanau
Spent several weeks in Cajun Country last winter with this book as our guide. Found a LOT of wonderful, out of the way places and experiences that we never would have known about otherwise. My New Orleans "born and raised" friends didn't even know about many of them. This is a wonderful area to visit -- we camped, but ate most of our meals out to really get the "local flavor" (I'm getting hungry just remembering). This book does a good job of describing all the local foods, too.
Good directions to all the "little places" and good descriptions of what you'll find there. If you go to any of the dances (and you should!), be sure to call ahead and find out what the current start time is. In the Christmas season, try to catch one of the many "boat parades" on the bayous -- they're not listed in the book, but just ask around and people will tell you when and where.
Hugifyn
even though this is an old guide, it is still the best guide for cajun country. although many of the food and dance joints are not still around, this gives the best overall info on cajun country. some of the best music is still there, including the saturday morning jam session at the savoy music center in eunice and satureday (only) at fred's in mamau. not to be missed!
inform
This guide was helpful. It helped in planning our trip and deciding what to see and what to do. Good hints about music and food.
mr.Mine
I just came back from Cajun country after using this book for my itinerary.
I didn't check when this book was written before my purchase. I also didn't realize how much Katrina altered Louisiana.
This was my third time to Louisiana. The last time was in 1989.
That said, do not expect any tours in the book to exist anymore without calling.
Restaurants and stores were gone or hours/days open are no longer valid. Again, make sure you call.
I hope they update this book again. Just use the book in general and go with the flow! P.S. the old New Orleans is gone too. Won't return there.
Fohuginn
We used several guidebooks to plan a long weekend in southern Louisiana in connection with a family wedding in Lafayette. This was the most useful of the books.
The author gives a star to especially noteworthy attractions, hotels, and restaurants. We went by these stars to plan our trip and had a great time. Even our new Cajun cousins-in-law were impressed with the selections we made.
A close second as a guidebook was "Louisiana Dayride - 52 Short Trips from New Orleans" by Shelley Holl.
Two final notes: Neither guidebook covers the city of New Orleans itself; and every guidebook we read had the wrong area codes for many telephone numbers (Louisiana has 2 brand-new area codes -- 225 and 337)
sergant
This well-written book was invaluable for our family's week in Bayou country. It has a dry humor ("on the Bayou, land is a recent occurrence..."). It covers geography, history, culture, and then gets into where to stay, where to eat, where to dance, what to see, and what to do. It's pretty up front (about one town -- "don't get hungry here...").
Everything we tried that was recommended in the book was great fun. One of the eateries was not so much wonderful as wonderfully different, but we were glad we went just as well.
Some of the details are a little out of date, but I think that's due to their specificity. If you say that a tiny bakery makes sweet potato pies between 11-3 on Thursdays, but the one owner-baker decides to change to Wednesdays, there's not much to be done about that. Even so, that only happened once in the entire week.
We had this book and the Delorme LA map, and that was a perfect set of resources for us. We had a great time, and I'm confident it was due to this book in particular.
Highly recommended.
This book is a great guide to a significant number of the thriving hot spots for cajun and zydeco music and dance. Though that was my main interest, I also found myself visiting sugar plantions and found an excellent bayou tour and great places to stay and eat that are still very local in cultural feel as opposed to the more tourist oriented culture of New Orleans. I skimmed through 3 other guides tossed them aside and then kept this book at hand constantly while driving around the bayou country. I've been two years in a row to lafayette area and am going back again, and I still will have this guide close at hand as I plan and travel in cajun country.