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by Pico Iyer
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Specialty Travel
  • Author:
    Pico Iyer
  • ISBN:
    0375415068
  • ISBN13:
    978-0375415067
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Knopf; First Edition edition (April 6, 2004)
  • Pages:
    240 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Specialty Travel
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1268 kb
  • ePUB format
    1260 kb
  • DJVU format
    1752 kb
  • Rating:
    4.1
  • Votes:
    778
  • Formats:
    mbr doc mobi docx


Start by marking Sun After Dark: Flights Into the Foreign as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Start by marking Sun After Dark: Flights Into the Foreign as Want to Read: Want to Read savin.

Pico Iyer – one of our most compelling and profoundly provocative travel writers – invites us to accompany him on. .

Pico Iyer – one of our most compelling and profoundly provocative travel writers – invites us to accompany him on an array of exotic explorations, from . and Yemen to Haiti and Ethiopia, from a Bolivian prison to a hidden monastery in Tibet. He goes to Cambodia, where the main tourist attraction is a collection of skulls from the Khmer Rouge killing fields, and travels through southern Arabia in the weeks before September 11, 2001. And how does travel take us more deeply into reality, both within us and without? Intensely affecting, Iyer’s explorations are a road map of thinking in new ways about our changing world.

Iyer loves the prospect of stepping out of the daylight of everything I know, into the shadows of that I don’t know, may never know.

The Place across the Mountains, He and the cabbie get lost in La Paz trying to find a Mexican restaurant he’s read about (3), (He couldn’t find a restaurant closer to where he was already? ), Begins to worry they won’t get out of the maze they’ve stumbled into. I could have been back in CA (or in the mock. Iyer loves the prospect of stepping out of the daylight of everything I know, into the shadows of that I don’t know, may never know. (8), Confronted by the foreign, we grow newly attentive to the details of the world, even as we make out, sometimes, the larger outline that lies behind them. (In what ways has this happened to you?

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Sun After Dark: Flights . In this latest volume of travel reminiscences, British-born Indian Pico Iyer claims to take the reader on a walk through the dark side, essays on visits to some of the world's lost and forgotten countries, from Cambodia, to Yemen, Bolivia and Haiti. And when Iyer sticks to the theme, his writing shines.

Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Sun After Dark: Flights Into the . Pico Iyer is the author of several books about cultures converging, including Video Night in Kathmandu, The Lady and the Monk, The Global Soul, and, most recently, Abandon.

Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Sun After Dark: Flights Into the Foreign" для чтения в офлайн-режиме. He lives in suburban Japan.

A cryptic encounter in the perfumed darkness of Bali; a tour of a Bolivian prison, conducted by an enterprising inmate; a nightmarish taxi ride across southern Yemen, where the men with guns may be customs inspectors or e are just three of the stops on Pico Iyer's latest itinerary. But the true subject of Sun After Dark is the dislocations of the mind in transit

Pico Iyer Pico Iyer was born 1957 in Oxford, England. He was raised in England and California.

Pico Iyer Pico Iyer was born 1957 in Oxford, England. The Recovery of Innocence. TED Books Box Set: The Creative Mind: The Art of Stillness, The Future of Architecture, and Judge This. Pico Iyer, Marc Kushner, Chip Kidd

Siddharth Pico Raghavan Iyer (born 11 February 1957), known as Pico Iyer, is a British-born essayist and novelist, often known for his travel writing. Sun after Dark: Flights into the Foreign (New York: Knopf, April 2004 hardback. Vintage, April 2005 paperback /. ISBN 0-375-41506-8).

Siddharth Pico Raghavan Iyer (born 11 February 1957), known as Pico Iyer, is a British-born essayist and novelist, often known for his travel writing. He is the author of numerous books on crossing cultures including Video Night in Kathmandu, The Lady and the Monk and The Global Soul.

If you don’t feel like dealing with planes, trains, and automobiles this summer, grab a lawn chair and this book instead

If you don’t feel like dealing with planes, trains, and automobiles this summer, grab a lawn chair and this book instead.

Pico Iyer&Mdash;One Of The Most Compelling And Profoundly Provocative Travel Writers&Mdash;Invites Us To Accompany Him On An Array Of.Sun After Dark: Flights Into the Foreign Pico Iyer Перегляд фрагмента - 2004.

Pico Iyer&Mdash;One Of The Most Compelling And Profoundly Provocative Travel Writers&Mdash;Invites Us To Accompany Him On An Array Of Exotic Explorations, From . To Yemen To Haiti And Ethiopia, From A Bolivian Prison To A Hidden Monastery In Tibet. Sun After Dark: Flights Into the Foreign Pico Iyer Перегляд фрагмента - 2005. Показати все . Загальні терміни та фрази.

Pico Iyer – one of our most compelling and profoundly provocative travel writers – invites us to accompany him on an array of exotic explorations, from L.A. and Yemen to Haiti and Ethiopia, from a Bolivian prison to a hidden monastery in Tibet. He goes to Cambodia, where the main tourist attraction is a collection of skulls from the Khmer Rouge killing fields, and travels through southern Arabia in the weeks before September 11, 2001. He practices meditation with Leonard Cohen and discusses geopolitics with the Dalai Lama, travels to Easter Island and through the imaginative terrains of W. G. Sebald and Kazuo Ishiguro, weaving physical and psychological challenges together into a seamless narrative. Throughout his travels, the familiar thrill of adventure is haunted by the unsettling questions that arise for Iyer everywhere he goes: How do we reconcile suffering with the sunlight often found around it? How does the foreign instruct the traveler, precisely by discomfiting him? And how does travel take us more deeply into reality, both within us and without? Intensely affecting, Iyer’s explorations are a road map of thinking in new ways about our changing world.

Kale
The titular star In Sun After Dark comes from Albert Camus, who wrote that he was born "halfway between poverty and the sun." The quote serves as a touchstone and a frame through which to view a disparate collection of essays, the common theme of which aspires to be the search for hope in even the darkest corners of the world.

"We travel most ...when we stumble, and we stumble most when we come to a place of poverty and need...."

In this latest volume of travel reminiscences, British-born Indian Pico Iyer claims to take the reader on a walk through the dark side, essays on visits to some of the world's lost and forgotten countries, from Cambodia, to Yemen, Bolivia and Haiti. And when Iyer sticks to the theme, his writing shines.

"...luxury, for some of us, is measured by the things we can do without."

Unfortunately, it seems either Iyer or the publisher decided to pad out the book with several pieces only marginally related to the theme, and so besides a memorable Kafkaesque journey through Yemen (that will have anyone who has lived on the Arabian peninsula laughing), we also get entirely forgettable book reviews, unrelated (if interesting) visits with Leonard Cohen and the Dalai Lama, and an insightful discourse on jet lag.

"...space and time open up as soon as you take leave of the simples ways in which you define yourself."

I took this book on a recent journey to Vietnam and despite its uneven content it was a mostly rewarding companion. I suspect many readers interested in travel or in Pico Iyer should find in it something of value, if only small passages like the ones I have quoted here, and with which I end.

"One virtue of grandparents, of seasons, or deer who come down from the hills, is that they remind us that we don't know everything, and can't make the world up entirely from scratch; much of it - most of it - is beyond our reach, even beyond our reckoning."
Kelerana
As usual, Iyer takes me to places I would have never visited without him. This collection of essays takes the reader from California to Japan to Angor Wat to Bolivia-- I'm always surprised by the places Iyer has been to, and his easy way of sharing his thoughts about them. This is a great armchair traveler book. You might not have time/energery/money to visit all these places, but Iyer's descriptions are so vivid that he does all the work for you--you just have to go along for the ride.
Mmsa
Pico is always good
DrayLOVE
Pico Iyer apparently has something of a cult following, and well, I guess his writing is an acquired taste. He's introspective, and on a first name basis with his old family friend, the Dalai Lama, and hangs out in the mountains above Los Angeles with Leonard Cohen and his Buddhist guru, but for all its potential, none of this was very interesting to me. Jet lag is a theme visited throughout the essays, and reading this book made me feel like I was suffering from it myself.
You don't learn much about the places described (that is, when Iyer actually writes about a place), but you learn about what's going on inside Iyer's head, and frankly, I just didn't get it.
Lailace
Compared to its predecessor "The Global Soul," I found this 2004 essay collection stronger in part. Although some of the pieces precede "Global" in their original publication in magazines, Iyer chooses wisely to gather them into as the title foreshadows a dimmer look at "flights into the foreign." The relentless jet travel returns, as defining Iyer; one essay here is all about jet lag, how one eats six lunches in one day.

Not that this has happened to me, but he charts one jaunt that took him thirty-three hours, from Santa Barbara to Oman, and he draws on certainly a far wider range of experiences than most of his readers, I reckon. "Since then, like many of us, I've run into the Tibetan leader everywhere I go--at Harvard, in New York, in the hills of Malibu, in Japan"--this from an essay on the Dalai Lama after Iyer tells of his own father meeting the DL when Iyer was three back in Oxford. Of course, we read Iyer for his wider perspective, but as in "Global" (see my 5/12 review) one cannot shake his air of entitlement that accompanies his evocations.

Neither can he, in part. The post-9/11 mood of many of these fifteen inclusions does force Iyer to confront the poverty and pain within those whom he meets. One strong essay, "On the Ropebridge," contrasts the wish-fulfilling image (as it were) of wondrous Tibet he brings as a Westerner to that land; another surveys the begging children in the aftermath of the Khmer Rouge at Angkor as Iyer must compare their fate as skeletons, or as parasites, on the tourism that is seen to revive a shattered Cambodia. These sorts of Hobson-Jobson choices (a term he explains in a smart section on Hinglish, or how Indians adapt and alter English a half-century after independence) speckle these pages.

These essays, admittedly, do vary in quality. After a strong start with the first two (your reactions may differ, and I write as one less enchanted with the famous, rich or otherwise, than Iyer, despite my sympathies for the Tibetan cause), the rest offer ups and downs, and some merit more skimming than immersion. Iyer's talent may, I suspect, get rushed along by deadlines and compress itself by word counts for the magazines to which he contributes if "often in very different form" the originals that are the core of the essays anthologized. Like many essayists or travel writers, the uneven results do betray a sense that it's another two or three years, so it's another collection.

I suppose the "Open Road" book (see my 9/08 review) which a decade later followed the article on the Dalai Lama included some of the material here as the 1998 "Making Kindness Stand to Reason"; still, this affectionate portrait shows the subject with a real rapport alongside Iyer. So does the one before it from the same year, an elegant study ("A Gathering Around a Perplexity") of the willfully gnomic Leonard Cohen at his Mt. Baldy Zen retreat in Southern California. "Where else should he be, where else could he be, than in a military-style ritualized training that allows him to put Old Testament words to a country-and-western beat and write songs that sound like first-person laments written by God?" (31)

Many are shorter, more like vignettes, on Angkor or La Paz, Ethiopia or Bali, Easter Island or Haiti. These help balance the profiles and the reviews of W. G. Sebald and Kazuo Ishigawa; I can see why he reads Ryszard Kapu'ci'ski--Iyer appears to channel his style in some shorter entries, for better or worse. There's not many surprises here; that consistency may ground Iyer or it may make him mundane, for all his globalized enthusiasms. He tells us what he sees, but remains often possessed of considerable sangfroid, even if he convincingly reports the oddity of so much jet-lag from his Japanese home and his long flights to Santa Barbara to see his mother, so often these days.

The one piece that throws me as it did him is the end of his Bolivian stint, when he visits, along with other tourists, a prison--arranged it seems by the inmates who call the shots. Here, I found as with Graham Greene or Kapu'ci'ski the jolt of the sudden lapse from civility to brutality. You don't know, for once, what happens next, and Iyer in the telling improves on his experience by not telling us the whole story, but by editing, as if a dramatic film recreating the event, to heighten the unease he feels. Along with that sustained passage into the unpredictable, the more familiar encounters with Cohen and Dalai Lama essays were my favorites, and the jet-lag and Tibetan accounts runners-up. Iyer, by focusing less on his elevation above so many of his compatriots, in his best journalism manages to remind us of what he has in common, as do we, with the diverse peoples he keeps finding and the conversations and reflections he manages to record, relate, and revamp.