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by Maureen Wheeler
Download Travel With Children (LONELY PLANET TRAVEL WITH CHILDREN) fb2
Reference
  • Author:
    Maureen Wheeler
  • ISBN:
    0864422997
  • ISBN13:
    978-0864422996
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Lonely Planet; 3 edition (September 1, 1995)
  • Pages:
    160 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Reference
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1608 kb
  • ePUB format
    1915 kb
  • DJVU format
    1571 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    207
  • Formats:
    lrf azw rtf mobi


Travel with children may sound like a recipe for disaster, but Maureen Wheeler manages to convey the fun she and her family .

Travel with children may sound like a recipe for disaster, but Maureen Wheeler manages to convey the fun she and her family have had on the road and the importance travel has played in their family life. about 3/4 of the book has location-specific info on things to do, but only offered 2 pages on France so it was not all that helpful in my case.

Tony wheeler lonely planet images. Travel with children provides insights into sity, the seeds

Tony wheeler lonely planet images. Maureen and tony wheeler with their children, tashi and kieran. more than a few days. Kieran, even at three months, knew he would rather be home; Tashi loved being on the road. Travel with children provides insights into sity, the seeds. who’ve never travelled before are taking the plunge.

The book is a guide to travelling to specific, recommended locations with kids. Travel with Children provides a few dozen recommended travel destinations for families. It is broken down by world region.

Nov 20, 2018 Rebecca Wheeler rated it it was ok. A library loan, I found this interesting to start with, but very outdated, and limited. The book is a guide to travelling to specific, recommended locations with kids. Each destination is rated upon a few factors, such as cost, availability of a variety of food, and health/safety recommendations.

Maureen Wheeler, AO, is a Northern Irish-Australian businesswoman, who co-founded Lonely Planet with her husband Tony Wheeler

Maureen Wheeler, AO, is a Northern Irish-Australian businesswoman, who co-founded Lonely Planet with her husband Tony Wheeler. She was born in Belfast, Northern Ireland and moved to London at the age 20, where she met her future husband, Tony Wheeler. They travelled from London through Europe and Asia, then on to Australia. That trip resulted in a guidebook Across Asia on the Cheap and laid the foundations of the travel publisher Lonely Planet.

Come explore! Let’s start an adventure. Lonely Planet Kids draws on our huge team of global experts to inspire children to be curious about. 5. Take a journey into the unknown and discover the planet’s wildest and most wonderful sights.

This updated version of Travel With Children offers you the most comprehensive advice for taking your family on the road, and now adds hundreds of destination ideas backed up by great photography and practical itineraries

This updated version of Travel With Children offers you the most comprehensive advice for taking your family on the road, and now adds hundreds of destination ideas backed up by great photography and practical itineraries. Assembled by Lonely Planet's team of travel-savvy parent experts, family travellers can rely on insights and advice on choosing the right trip, healthy travel, travelling with teens and much more.

Lonely Planet: The world's leading travel guide publisher "Toting kids on the road? Our crack team of parent-authors has assembled the motherlode of ideas and advice for kids and families of all ages - where to go, what to see, and how to answer at least some of those 'but why?'s. Fully revised and redesigned Health chapter written with a medical expert Tips on choosing the right kind of trip for your family Special advice.

Maureen and Tony Wheeler, founders of Lonely Planet travel books. Maureen even wrote a guidebook about it called Travel with Children

Maureen and Tony Wheeler, founders of Lonely Planet travel books. Maureen even wrote a guidebook about it called Travel with Children. The Wheelers have ensured that Lonely Planet maintains a total commitment to responsible travel, right down to using recycled materials in publishing.

Lonely Planet is a large travel guide book publisher. As of 2011, the company had sold 120 million books since inception. Lonely Planet was founded by married couple Maureen and Tony Wheeler. The company name originates from the misheard "lovely planet" in a song written by Matthew Moore

Travel with children may sound like a recipe for disaster, but Maureen Wheeler manages to convey the fun she and her family have had on the road and the importance travel has played in their family life. Their experiences, and those of other travelling families, provide loads of practical information and advice on how to make travel as stress-free as possible for both kids and their parents.

Gamba
I purchased several books on traveling with children for my upcoming trip to Paris with a 1 yr old. This was my least favorite, and a bit disappointing. I found it to be page after page of common sense, like telling me to pack baby's clothes, diapers, and feeding items...about 3/4 of the book has location-specific info on things to do, but only offered 2 pages on France so it was not all that helpful in my case. I found "Travels With Baby" by Shelly Rivoli to be MUCH more useful and packed with fantastic tips and resources.
Samulkree
So far i am enjoying the insights this book offers into the experience of travelling abroad with little kids; the playgrounds in paris, the lack of diapers in india, etc... I hope to get lots out of it and mainly to calm some of my fears so that i can bravely go where moms and dads have gone before.
Zodama
If you have never traveled with your baby or kids before, I would recommend a different book that contains more "advice," like Lutz's On the Go with Baby.

If you are going to travel extensively with your kids, this is a nice book to have in your travel library. It does not get too specific about individual places, but then again it does have some interesting specifics you may not find in other books. The first-hand accounts are great. It is rather short, but it does have some good advice and anecdotes pertaining to travel in out-of-the-way places. I was disappointed it does not refer to the extent English is spoken in various foreign countries. However, if you are a little adventurous and are thinking about planning a trip with kids-in-tow, but don't know exactly where you want to go, this is a good book to use in the decision making process.
Fenrinos
I'm afraid thats the impression I got, and I felt a bit duped, especially as it seemed an exciting concept. Someone (a journalist?) had some ideas, had some spare time, knew a few people who had been abroad with their children, and did some cutting and pasting!
Much of the content is obvious, like bring some nappies when travelling with a baby (really!),the travel stories are strangely pedestrian ... even in the most exotic locations the stories and the people barely come to life it is so passionless, and single parents are given just a couple of pages.
On the one hand it is not particularly insightful or inspirational, and on the other hand it doesn't really take account of real problems that may arise e.g. a young toddler's illness abroad (my recent experience).
Some of the obvious things it says are, I have to say, truly breathtaking.
but its not so bad, if you can read through all the "filler" you might find a few interesting bits, you could borrow it from the library, but please don't shell out good money for such an unserious book.
one final constant annoyance is the author's constant referral to children (and babies presumably) as "kids". Why journalists do this I don't know. I think something dismissive about the term, and it says alot about the level at which the book is pitched.
Ubrise
I really appreciated this title, as one of the best on travelling with younger children. Advice, first-hand narratives, child gear availability(highchairs, carseats) and breastfeeding acceptability info is given on many countries as broken down by region, both typical - European countries - to non-typical, such as Nepal. Much of the advice is provided by experts in that region (i.e. a family who lived in the mideast provides Mideast information).
While it's probably not the best for parents of older children (try Cynthia Harriman's Take your Kids to Europe), it's incredibly inspirational to those with children 4 and under, even those with multiple children 4 and under (one contributor has such a situation!). It's also *much* better than the previous edition by the same title, which you may still find floating around in used bookstores.
I only wish they had done some sort of "best of" list - i.e. best countries for parents of toddlers, best for parents of babies, best for older-younger kids, etc.
Gavikelv
As a mother of two, I found this book both inspiring and encouraging. There's loads of information on countries I've always thought of visitng but thought it would be too hard with kids and tonnes of reader's tips and stories that really give you the feeling it can be done. There's a great story about a French family who threw it all in to travel around the world and give their kids a real education through travel. Inspiring stuff for Mums!
Tygralbine
There wasn't much here for traveling with 11 to 14 year-olds. I gave this book to my sister and she felt it had some good suggestions for traveling with her very young children. Her family travels with her husband on business trips that last a week or two. I am still looking.
This book was not what I expected. I was looking for travel tips for traveling with my 1 year old child. I found page after page of anecdotes of other parents taking their kids to zoos around the world. If you are looking tips on what to bring/ how to travel I would recommend Rick Steve's "Europe through the Back Door." His traveling with kids section is much more pratical.