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by Abbie Rosner
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Middle East
  • Author:
    Abbie Rosner
  • ISBN:
    9657594006
  • ISBN13:
    978-9657594001
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Hilayon Press (April 18, 2012)
  • Pages:
    260 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Middle East
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1382 kb
  • ePUB format
    1871 kb
  • DJVU format
    1800 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    270
  • Formats:
    lrf doc mbr mobi


Reading "Breaking Bread in Galilee" by Abbie Rosner is an immersive experience. This book is easy to read and informative

Reading "Breaking Bread in Galilee" by Abbie Rosner is an immersive experience. Each page was a discovery of joy and passion. While the book is ostensibly about food, it's also about people, and history, and ways of life and of interacting with others and with the agricultural and natural environment. This book is easy to read and informative. While it is written in the first-person and Rosner's personality comes through clearly, it is not about HER, but about the people she meets and the things she learns and experiences. I felt like I was sharing those experiences and getting to know those people personally.

Breaking Bread in Galilee recounts a journey intoNorthern Israel’s agricultural landscape, to discover food-ways describedin the Bible that are still being practiced today, but may be bound forextinction in our lifetime. In the process, she also discovers thatdialogue over food effectively dispels mistrust and creates a powerfulbridge across the Jewish-Arab divide. Discussion Questions. Jewish literature inspires, enriches, and educates the community. Help support the Jewish Book Council.

Breaking Bread in Galilee - A Culinary Journey into the Promised Land, by Abbie Rosner, takes the reader along a journey the author has made, exploring local foods and age-old culinary traditions that are described in the Hebrew Bible, and still being practiced in the Galilee today. In the process, she, and the reader, experiences how sharing foodways is a powerful means for overcoming suspicion and building bridges between individuals on each side of this country's bitter conflict

The book is a deep dive into the Western conservative narrative of the region. Rosner’s 2012 release is good read nonetheless, and it includes stories about the Druze, a minority population who live primarily in Northern Israel.

The book is a deep dive into the Western conservative narrative of the region. My Vacation in the Holy Land, Tom Bissell. It’s no surprise that Christians flock here to visit the holy sites. Bissell joins a tour group of Zionist Christians (it’s a thing) and - well, it’s complicated. On Harper’s Magazine. G Adventures runs a number of departures to Israel encompassing a wide range of departure dates and activities to cater to different tastes.

When Abbie Rosner, A Jewish woman from Washington, DC, moved to Israel’s lower Galilee in the late 1980s she probably . But that’s exactly what happened, as she explains in her new book Breaking Bread in the Galilee.

When Abbie Rosner, A Jewish woman from Washington, DC, moved to Israel’s lower Galilee in the late 1980s she probably didn’t anticipate developing a fascination with the foods of the bible, learning to forage wild edible plants, or befriending the neighboring Arab Bedouins.

Breaking Bread in Galilee. I cover how older adults are discovering and re-discovering cannabis. What a wonderful book – evocative, moving, fascinating, about a food, a country and people we want to know about. It is an important book that matters, and you have written it so well. Breaking Bread in Galilee, published by Hilayon Press, recounts a journey into Northern Israel’s agricultural landscape, to discover foodways described in the Bible that are still being practiced today, but may be bound for extinction in our lifetime.

Books by Abbie Rosner. Breaking Bread in Galilee A Culinary Journey into the Promised Land by Abbie Rosner Paperback, 260 Pages, Published 2012 by Hilayon Press ISBN-13: 978-965-7594-00-1, ISBN: 965-7594-00-6

Books by Abbie Rosner. Breaking Bread in Galilee A Culinary Journey into the Promised Land by Abbie Rosner Paperback, 260 Pages, Published 2012 by Hilayon Press ISBN-13: 978-965-7594-00-1, ISBN: 965-7594-00-6. Proceedings of the International Conference Privatization in higher education by Zehev Tadmor, Carol Diament, Charlotte Diament, Abbie Rosner 351 Pages, Published 2006 ISBN-13: 978-965-90911-0-2, ISBN: 965-90911-.

And when we left, Pam Shepard was still snuffling and teary. It was nearly eleven and we were overfed and sleepy. e graciously, I thought, considering the aggravation she’d been giving me. You haven’t been slipping off to encounter groups under an assumed name, have you?. I don’t quite know why I’m so bitchy lately, she said. It’s not bitchy, exactly. I feel from you a kind of steady pressure. An obligation to explain myself.

Breaking Bread in Galilee - A Culinary Journey into the Promised Land, by Abbie Rosner, takes the reader along a journey the author has made, exploring local foods and age-old culinary traditions that are described in the Hebrew Bible, and still being practiced in the Galilee today. In the process, she, and the reader, experiences how sharing foodways is a powerful means for overcoming suspicion and building bridges between individuals on each side of this country's bitter conflict. The book's investigation of indigenous food practices will appeal to those who are interested in food and food history, particularly when they identify with the local and slow food movements. Recipes included with some of the chapters will enable readers to enter further into this world. For an audience that is overwhelmed with troubling news from the Middle East, this book presents a refreshingly uplifting example of friendship and trust across the Jewish-Arab divide. The Galilee orientation and Biblical and Koranic references offer an unusually inclusive perspective on the Holy Land and sacred texts.

Skiletus
I visit the Galilee almost every year, yet Breaking Bread in Galilee helped me see it as if for the first time. Abbie Rosner's love of the land, and her passion for understanding the ancient ways comes through on every page. This book is a travelogue to places most people will never get a chance to visit. There is great value in that. Although Ms. Rosner's never says it explicitly, even the order of her book mirrors the seasons in Israel. If you appreciate agricultural history, this is a book you will surely enjoy. Ms. Rosner's brings the Galilee alive on every page. A must read for lovers of Israel, food and the Bible.
Gogul
Excellent source of biblical references linked to today's agriculture in the middle east.
Shows how people working together can overcome pressures brought upon them by outside sources.
Very readable. Excellent recipes.
Kashicage
BREAKING BREAD IN GALILEE is, all at once, a travelogue, a lesson in history, a celebration of food, an archaeological journey, and a political manifesto. The combination of Rosner's covert and overt subject matters, her mature, poised tone (which alternates between the ecstatic and the mournful), and the lapidary nature of many of her sentences caused me to read slowly and carefully, savoring every nuance. In that way, Rosner's prose reproduces for the attentive reader the experience she evokes again and again--not only of the mindful preparation and eating of food but of the prayerful approach of one human to another. There is a timeless meditative quality to the mood Rosner's book produces in the reader, and I found it enlivening, relaxing, nourishing, both tremendously sad and exalting. (Full disclosure: I read the book in manuscript and suggested a few line-edits.)
sobolica
Reading "Breaking Bread in Galilee" by Abbie Rosner is an immersive experience. Each page was a discovery of joy and passion. While the book is ostensibly about food, it's also about people, and history, and ways of life and of interacting with others and with the agricultural and natural environment. As beautifully written, deeply researched and well-organized as the book is, the overall effect is of a very natural journey of discovery -- of fast-disappearing foods and traditions, as well as of new friends. Rosner's curiosity and openness to learn more about and get to know her Arab and Druze neighbors creates a framework for readers to do the same. This book is easy to read and informative. While it is written in the first-person and Rosner's personality comes through clearly, it is not about HER, but about the people she meets and the things she learns and experiences. I felt like I was sharing those experiences and getting to know those people personally. Great to read through from beginning to end and then to dip back into to re-read specific parts.
Forcestalker
Rosner's romp through the Galilee is fun on the culinary front -- if you want to know the difference between freeka and burgul, for example, or understand more about how the traditional local diet mirrors the growing seasons, you'll love this book. The chapters are short essays relating Rosner's encounters and adventures with various locals, and the anecdotes are vivid, well-told and informative (although the endings are sometimes a little too pat).

Two caveats:

1. Sorely missing are photographs. The one on the cover is tantalizing and whets the appetite for more. What does wild asparagus look like anyway? How about the tabun she built? Her friend's famous cookies? The ancient olive and wine presses she describes?

2. Rosner's thesis, which she hammers at unceasingly, that if Jews and Arabs would just sit down and eat together, all difficulties would be resolved is both naive and disingenuous. Her strong tendency to romanticize the agrarian Arabs she meets makes for a happy but sadly misleading story. Several examples, although there are many more:

a) She mentions a memorial in one Arab village to residents killed from the early 20th century through to the Second Intifada, without ever mentioning the thousands of Jewish citizens deliberately targeted by Arab terrorists as part of said intifada. It's akin to bemoaning the post 9/11 difficulty of some Muslims in passing through airport security without ever mentioning why they were having that difficulty.

b) She refers to the scourge of agricultural theft without mentioning that it's a one-way street. Hint: the Jews are not the ones doing the stealing. Since her husband is a police officer in the district, there's no way she doesn't know this.

There are many, many such instances in the book. Toward the end of the book, she throws in two examples of Jews in the Galilee who also have some connection to the land, perhaps because she felt a need to correct the obvious imbalance in her reporting.

Summary: While enjoying the culinary adventure, the reader should be aware that there's an awful lot of ugly stuff that the author has chosen to glide over for the sake of a nice story.