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by Robert Sullivan
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Food Lodging & Transportation
  • Author:
    Robert Sullivan
  • ISBN:
    1582345279
  • ISBN13:
    978-1582345277
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Bloomsbury USA (June 27, 2006)
  • Pages:
    256 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Food Lodging & Transportation
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1207 kb
  • ePUB format
    1229 kb
  • DJVU format
    1253 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    708
  • Formats:
    mobi txt lit docx


Robert Sullivan is a cross-country veteran, having made numerous trips from coast to coast in pursuit of jobs, weddings . If the author of this book left out the words LEWIS AND CLARK tbis book would have been 200 pages shorter.

Robert Sullivan is a cross-country veteran, having made numerous trips from coast to coast in pursuit of jobs, weddings and vacations. The central thread of this book is his latest cross country trip back from a west-coast family wedding to home in New York City. I nearly put this book down in the beginning because of this monotony but glad I didn't because it became an enjoyable read with lots of interesting facts and trivia about roads, motels, people and early days of travel. 5 people found this helpful.

Sullivan, Robert, 1963-. The author chronicles his family's annual migration across the country from Oregon to New York, documenting the humor, and offbeat experiences of life on the road, wihle reflecting on such nation-crossing predecessors as Lewis and Clark.

Like all good road books, Cross Country generates the excitement that the idea of transcontinental travel holds: the .

Like all good road books, Cross Country generates the excitement that the idea of transcontinental travel holds: the hope to find something new that we don't realize exists while standing still. This is a road-trip ode to all the families who have traveled by car across America.

As he drives, Sullivan ponders his Lewis and Clark and other fellow nation-crossers, meets Beat poets who are devotees of cross-country icon Jack Kerouac, and plays golf on an abandoned coal mine. And, in his trademark celebration of the mundane, Sullivan investigates everything from the history of the gas pump to the origins of fast food and rest stops.

Written by. Robert Sullivan. Manufacturer: Bloomsbury USA Release date: 27 June 2006 ISBN-10 : 1582345279 ISBN-13: 9781582345277. add. Separate tags with commas, spaces are allowed. Use tags to describe a product . for a movie Themes heist, drugs, kidnapping, coming of age Genre drama, parody, sci-fi, comedy Locations paris, submarine, new york.

CROSS COUNTRY: 15 YEARS AND 90,000 MILES ON THE ROADS AND INTERSTATES OF AMERICA is a travelogue like none other, providing a jolly story of a family car trip across America from Oregon to New York - and reflecting on history and culture along the way. From a similar.

A spicy, involving and highly recommended story evolves.

Author Robert Sullivan's new book chronicles his family's cross-country trips from Oregon to New York

Author Robert Sullivan's new book chronicles his family's cross-country trips from Oregon to New York. Its subtitle paints the picture: Cross Country: Fifteen Years and 90,000 Miles on the Roads and Interstates of America with Lewis and Clark, a lot of bad motels, a moving van, Emily Post, Jack Kerouac, my wife, my mother-in-law, two kids, and enough coffee to kill an elephant. Sullivan is also the author of the books The Meadowlands and A Whale Hunt. He is a frequent contributor to publications including Conde Nast Traveler and The New York Times Magazine.

CROSS COUNTRY: Fifteen Years and 90,000 Miles on the Roads and Interstates of America with Lewis and Clark, a Lot of Bad Motels, a Moving Van, Emily Post, Jack Kerouac, My Wife, My Mother-in-Law, Two Kids, and Enough Coffee to Kill an Elephant. Пользовательский отзыв - Kirkus. Rollicking, ironic chronicle of a family car trip from Oregon to New York, interlaced with stories about previous trips, Lewis and Clark, Jack Kerouac, varieties of coffee lids, and.

Book condition good -Cross Country: Fifteen Years and Ninety . Trending price is based on prices over last 90 days.

Book condition good -Cross Country: Fifteen Years and Ninety Thousand Mile. Book condition good. item 2 Cross Country: Fifteen Years and 90,000 Miles on the Roads and Interstates of Am -Cross Country: Fifteen Years and 90,000 Miles on the Roads and Interstates of Am. £. 3. Current slide {CURRENT SLIDE} of {TOTAL SLIDES}- Save on Non-Fiction. The Repair Shop: A Make Do And Mend Handbook Hardcover. Health Safety And Environment Test For Operatives And Specialists 2019 GT100/19.

To be included, a book needed to have a narrative arc matching the chronological and geographical arc of the trip it chronicles. Cross Country: Fifteen Years and 90,000 Miles on the Roads and Interstates of America with Lewis and Clark by Robert Sullivan. It needed to be non-fictional or, as in the case of On the Road, at least told in the first person. The process, which Kreitner describes as quixotic, was a lengthy one, but it wasn’t so difficult with a beer and a record on, he says. The Lost Continent by Bill Bryson. Blue Highways: A Journey into America by William Least Heat-Moon.

From the bestselling author of Rats, a personal and national history of one of America's favorite pastimes: driving across the country.

The cross-country trip is the trip that often whizzes past us on our way to quaint back roads and scenic parks; it's an America of long, looping highways, strip malls, fast-food depots, and road rage, but also one that is wide-open, awe-inspiring, and heartwarmingly lonely. Here, Sullivan, who has driven cross-country more than two dozen times, recounts his family's annual summer migration from Oregon to New York. His story of moving his family back and forth from the East Coast to the West Coast (and various other migrations), is replete with all the minor disasters, humor, and wonderful coincidences that characterize life on the road, not to mention life.

As he drives, Sullivan ponders his nation-crossing predecessors, such as legendary duo Lewis and Clark, as well the more improbable heroes of America's unending urge to cross itself: Carl Fisher, an Indianapolis bicycle maker who founded the Indy 500, dropped cars off of buildings and imagined the first cross-country road; Emily Post, who, before her life as an etiquette writer, was one of the first cross-country chroniclers; and the race car drivers who, appalled by the invention of seatbelts and speed limits, ran an underground cross-country car race in the 1970s known as the Cannonball Run. Sullivan meets Beat poets who are devotees of Jack Kerouac, cross-country icon, and plays golf on an abandoned coal mine. And, in his trademark celebration of the mundane, Sullivan investigates everything from the history of the gas pump to the origins of fast food and rest stops. Cross Country tells the tales that come from fifteen years of driving across the country (and all around it) with two kids and everything that two kids and two parents take when driving in a car from one coast to another, over and over, driving to see the way the road made America and America made the road.


Saberdragon
Cross Country is about straight driving on America's interstates. The book, however, is more like a Sunday afternoon ramble over country lanes with many detours and unplanned stops.

Robert Sullivan is a cross-country veteran, having made numerous trips from coast to coast in pursuit of jobs, weddings and vacations. The central thread of this book is his latest cross country trip back from a west-coast family wedding to home in New York City. Along the way, Sullivan gets sidetracked many times, delving into past trips, the "cross country trip from hell," the creation of the interstate system, rest stops, towel dispensers in rest stops, rest stop coffee, rest stop food, road side art and most enduringly, Lewis and Clark related stops in the North and Upper Western parts of his journey (the author has an abiding fascination with the first US cross-country explorers).

At its best, Cross Country is a fascinating collection of trivia and stories behind the interstate system. At its worst, it's like watching somebody else's home movies. Fortunately, the home movie aspect is less than the fascinating. I enjoyed the in-depth telling of the creation of the interstate road network, and Sullivan has a collection of interesting factoids about America's roads, crash and safety statistics and the personalities behind the creation of America's national road system. He also highlights Lewis and Clark's journey whenever the road crosses their trail. He delves into the story of incredibly mundane aspects of road travel, like the development and variety of coffee lids and the pros and cons of competing bathroom towel dispenser designs. (It really is more interesting than it sounds - he writes these well.)

Interspersed with these vignettes is the family trip. His family is a nice enjoyable lot; these parts of the book range from witty and amusing to tedious. Sullivan is no Bill Bryson when it comes to travel writing, but he has produced an enjoyable book nonetheless.
deadly claw
Mr. Sullivan's RAT Book was more informative than this drivel. The book smelled of musk oil.
Vushura
I picked this up on a whim and was rewarded with a very good read. I could barely put it down and finished it wishing the trip went on a bit longer. It's a different take on the family road trip to be sure, but one I thoroughly enjoyed.
Mananara
If the author of this book left out the words LEWIS AND CLARK tbis book would have been 200 pages shorter. I nearly put this book down in the beginning because of this monotony but glad I didn't because it became an enjoyable read with lots of interesting facts and trivia about roads, motels, people and early days of travel.
Authis
The author jumped around too much in his narrative. It was hard to follow and the characters were not developed very well

I was disappointed.
Lailace
Oh well, whatever.
Manris
Put simply and frankly, this is a tedious book. Sullivan has other books to his name so clearly he can write. But this account of cross-country driving reveals only the inanity and bordeom of the journey, and none of the excitement, adventure or danger. Sullivan literally recounts every purchase of coffee, every gas stop, every conversation, every motel inspection. Sadly, he makes driving with one's kids sound as interesting as filling a car with gas for 25 hours a day. The intended sidetracks into the story of Lewis & Clark, or that of the car itself, remain stuck in neutral. Poor Kerouac would be ashamed to see his name in the title.
I liked this book.

Primarily, 'Cross Country' is an enjoyable travelogue of an average American family's cross-country vacation, written in an endearingly quirky narrative. But, by way of several historical segments and other tangential material interspersed through the text, the book gained another, educational dimension, as to develop a synergy with the tale of the family's unfolding road trip. In the end, it worked, and I feel better for having read it.

Thanks to the author, the subjects, and the publisher.