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by Kate Fox
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Europe
  • Author:
    Kate Fox
  • ISBN:
    0340818867
  • ISBN13:
    978-0340818862
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Hodder & Stoughton (April 2005)
  • Pages:
    432 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Europe
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1790 kb
  • ePUB format
    1174 kb
  • DJVU format
    1782 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    405
  • Formats:
    docx mobi txt lrf


Watching the english. Every aspect of English conversation and behaviour is put under the microscope.

Watching the english. The Hidden Rules of. English Behaviour. Kate Fox. HODDER amp; STOUGHTON. It is a wonderful read for both the English and those who look at us and wonder why we do what we do. Now they'll know. The book captivates at the first page. Watching the English is a thorough study which is interesting and amusing. Enjoyable good fun, with underlying seriousness - a book to dip into at random and relish for its many acute observations.

In Watching the English, social anthropologist Kate Fox takes a look at her own tribe with a view to coming up with a "grammar of Englishness. She watches the English quite literally, observing how they behave when in line at a coffee shop or on a train or while using a cellphone, eavesdropping on their conversations, performing experiments or testing hypotheses on unwitting strangers when she's out in public. Social scientists are not universally liked or appreciated, but we are still marginally more acceptable than alcoholics and escaped lunatics. Watching the English is absolutely fascinating and sometimes very funny.

Kate Fox Watching the EnglishWATCHING THE ENGLISH The Hidden Rules of English BehaviourKate Fox .

Kate Fox Watching the EnglishWATCHING THE ENGLISH The Hidden Rules of English BehaviourKate Fox HODDER & STOUGHTON. Following an erratic education in England, America, Ireland and France, she studied anthropology and philosophy at Cambridge. Watching the English. will make you laugh out loud ( Oh God. I do that! ) and cringe simultaneously ( Oh God. I do that as well.

Watching the English book. The rules of weather-speak. The ironic-gnome In WATCHING THE ENGLISH anthropologist Kate Fox takes a revealing look at the quirks, habits and foibles of the English people. She puts the English national character under her anthropological microscope, and finds a strange and fascinating culture, governed by complex sets of unspoken rules and byzantine codes of behaviour. The ironic-gnome rule.

In "Watching The English" anthropologist Kate Fox takes a revealing look at the quirks, habits and foibles of the English people

In "Watching The English" anthropologist Kate Fox takes a revealing look at the quirks, habits and foibles of the English people. The reflex apology rule. The paranoid-pantomime rule. Class indicators and class anxiety tests.

Kate Fox tells how awkwardness and hypocrisy rule a nation in Watching the English

Kate Fox tells how awkwardness and hypocrisy rule a nation in Watching the English. Catherine Bennett isn't so sure. Fox's curiosity about English behaviour, which she attempts to reduce, in this prodigously long investigation, into key constituent parts, is matched only by her regret that we are not a more free and easy nationality. For instance, we say "sorry" when someone else bumps into us, and take too much notice of queueing while pretending not to.

Any discussion of English conversation, like any English conversation, must begin with the Weather

Any discussion of English conversation, like any English conversation, must begin with the Weather. In this respect, we treat the English weather like a member of our family: one can complain about the behaviour of one's own children or parents, but any hint of censure from an outsider is unacceptable, and very bad manners.

National characteristics, English. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

In "Watching The English" anthropologist Kate Fox takes a revealing look at the quirks, habits and foibles of the English people. She puts the English national character under her anthropological microscope, and finds a strange and fascinating culture, governed by complex sets of unspoken rules and byzantine codes of behaviour. The rules of weather-speak. The ironic-gnome rule. The reflex apology rule. The paranoid-pantomime rule. Class indicators and class anxiety tests. The money-talk taboo and many more ...Through a mixture of anthropological analysis and her own unorthodox experiments (using herself as a reluctant guinea-pig), Kate Fox discovers what these unwritten behaviour codes tell us about Englishness.

Bloodhammer
There's a lot of interesting and amusing stuff about English culture and behaviour in this book, and I mostly enjoyed it, but the way it's written is frequently irritating. For one thing, the author's use of language is very, very repetitive, and she uses some words and phrases that I found quite irritating, such as "Eeyoreishness", "oh, come off it", "social dis-ease" repeatedly throughout.

There's also the false pretense that the author is just some idiot with no special knowledge and that she's coming upon this information in the same order the reader is and formulating her conclusions as she goes, and obviously that's not the case; Fox is an accomplished anthropologist and books aren't written like that. She collected the information first and put it together in a specific and intentional order, and pretending that that's not the case seems pointless and dumb.
Faell
As a way to really get some sense of Englishness, this is well worth the read. Fox does a fine job of incorporating the trademark English humour throughout the book, and makes a fine go at really covering a wide range of situations. If there is any fault in the book, it is that at times it violates its stated cardinal rule of Englishness: it almost becomes too earnest in spots. Still, if you are travelling, or are an Anglophile, or just curious (or, heavens forbid, are actually English) this is a good read.
Jusari
In Watching the English, social anthropologist Kate Fox takes a look at her own tribe with a view to coming up with a "grammar of Englishness." She watches the English quite literally, observing how they behave when in line at a coffee shop or on a train or while using a cellphone, eavesdropping on their conversations, performing experiments or testing hypotheses on unwitting strangers when she's out in public. Sometimes she'll even outright interview them:

"A researcher with a notebook is a nuisance, of course, but much less scary than a random stranger trying to start a conversation for no apparent reason. If you simply start chatting to English people on trains or buses, they tend to assume you are either drunk, drugged or deranged. Social scientists are not universally liked or appreciated, but we are still marginally more acceptable than alcoholics and escaped lunatics."

Watching the English is absolutely fascinating and sometimes very funny. The author's writing is lively and lucid, but beyond her intentional humor there is humor inherent simply in taking a (relatively) detached look at behavior which most of the time we take for granted. (Just so, comedians like Jerry Seinfeld make us notice the humor in our everyday behavior.)

Fox neatly ties up her findings in the end with a diagram showing the ten English characteristics she's tracked throughout the book: at the core of it all is social dis-ease, but other characteristics include humor (i.e., humour), class consciousness, "Eeyorishness" (that is, a tendency to moan about things), and modesty. In sum, I loved the book, and I love the English, with whom--it seems clear to me now--I have much in common.

-- Debra Hamel
Rarranere
I have traveled to the UK many times and have friends there and I often found myself scratching my head at times in trying to figure out English culture. There were a number of times I exclaimed, "Oh! That's why they do that!" It explained a lot in my sometimes awkward interactions with the English. After reading the book, I took another trip to England and had a much easier time of relating to people (and they to me.) We speak the same language, but our cultures are very different. If you are and anglophile, travel to England frequently or are and expat living there, I highly recommend this book. I enjoyed the very humorous writing at times. It's a book on modern English cultural anthropology, but as dry as that sounds it was well written and highly entertaining.
Ndav
I had heard that this was a lot of fun to read as well as being a serious piece of work and so when I spied it in my local bookstore, used (but not from Oxfam) I jumped at the chance. Jump forward to a few years later and I have just completed this magnificent book but not for the reasons I had heard about.

I was born English, my antecedents being a mixture (as all English people are), in my case Irish on my fathers side and English on my mother's. I lived, was educated, and worked in England until 1995 when I emigrated to the United States, feeling more American than English with my spiritual home being in San Francisco. Although not an anthropologist by training, my degrees in the Social Sciences have been supported by observations of class in Great Britain.

This lengthy explanation is required because I have been able to observe at first hand and through practical examination of secondary materials the all pervasive British Social Class system which as Fox repeats several times, is not based on income. For example if you go to Broughton Castle in Oxfordshire and look around, the chances are that the elderly gentleman wearing a blazer and who is helping children try on breastplates and wield weapons is actually Lord Saye and Seale as opposed to an employee. At one of England's premier stately homes it is not uncommon to find the Duke himself tending plants. The examples are legion. I have so many stories to tell but all of which illuminate and illustrate the central tenents of this work, that is the British class system is alive and well but often hidden beneath the surface into which Fox delves so expertly.

For me one of the outstanding features of the English is the relatively rare examples of pure eccentricity, or as Fox describes it, the pure case of not giving a hoot. I had the great priviledge and distinct pleasure of being in the company of one of those Great British eccentrics for an hour or so when I got to spend an hour or so with Vivian Stanshall. (Google it if you want further info)

Being what is described as being a baby boomer, I have lived through the great transition of Britain as a postwar scarcity economy, rebuilding through the affluent society of the sixties currently undergoing the age of austerity,. And, I have to say, Fox hits the proverbial nail right on the head.

We all like to think that we are individuals and yet, as we all know, we are not really as we all want to belong. Whereas American individuality is constantly channeled into cooperative behaviours by the emphasis on teams even while the competitive nature of self is accentuated, the English are first and foremost competitive and inherently individualistic. Not really a contradiction. Kate Fox, makes a strong case of a cultural need for us Brits to join things. She correctly sees through the cries of individual choice to understanding that the nature of the English psyche is to navigate the complexities of class and cultural norms in order to find our way into social intercourse. The perception of verbal and non-verbal cues is a veritable minefield for one to navigate and aside from learning them in the home, there are few ways to succeed without discovering and incorporating them into our behaviour in order to succeed.

The book is a fascinating tongue in cheek study in many ways of the British Class system and the culture which it has spawned over the centuries. While fashions and fads come and go the superstructure remains and of course, nothing is new under the sun, or to put it another way what goes around comes around.

I found much mirth and enjoyment in this book and learnt a lot from it at the same time. To my utter horror and amazement I discovered that not only was I not as American orientated as I had thought I was, I was also more English than I thought I wasn't.

This is an excellent book for anyone going to England, actually Britain for the first time but for longer than a couple of weeks and for British people in general although I suspect those expatriots living abroad would enjoy it more. I think that if there was anything missing from this book I would have to say gardens because they can tell you a lot about Britons.

Have a great time with this book. I did. Thanks Ms Fox. You have made a fan ;-)