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by David Gilmour
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Europe
  • Author:
    David Gilmour
  • ISBN:
    0374533601
  • ISBN13:
    978-0374533601
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Farrar, Straus and Giroux; First edition (November 13, 2012)
  • Pages:
    480 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Europe
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1684 kb
  • ePUB format
    1606 kb
  • DJVU format
    1174 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    701
  • Formats:
    lit doc mbr docx


The Pursuit of Italy offers an enduring tribute to a various and wonderful people

The Pursuit of Italy offers an enduring tribute to a various and wonderful people. Ian Thomson, Evening Standard. Sir David Gilmour is one of Britain's most admired and accomplished historical writers and biographers. This delightfully coherent history of the country that in 1860 became the modern nation of Italy begins with the polyglot migrations into the Italian peninsula many centuries before the Christian era and ends with the chaotic premiership of Silvio Berlusconi. And what a ride it is! The two things that I most enjoyed and admired about this superb overview of Italian history are, first, its coherence.

Heading off in pursuit of Italy, David Gilmour finds instead a land and people defined enduringly by campanilismo . It is a provocative and at times puzzling argument that takes Gilmour right back to the peninsula's prehistory and the myth of Hercules rescuing a bull calf.

Heading off in pursuit of Italy, David Gilmour finds instead a land and people defined enduringly by campanilismo (literally, the municipal bell tower) – a communal loyalty – and with little interest in nationalism except when "forced or cajoled". From the outset, Gilmour wonders if the Risorgimento, the national unification of Italy under Garibaldi, Camillo Cavour and King Victor Emmanuel II, was successful, or even necessary. In a tour de force opening, Gilmour provides a wonderful survey of the region's limitations.

The historian, biographer and Italophile David Gilmour argues that Italy is another fragile union, and in The Pursuit of Italy he makes a persuasive (if not entirely unfamiliar) argument that the 1861 unification of the country, trumpeted by nationalists as a triumph of progressive.

The historian, biographer and Italophile David Gilmour argues that Italy is another fragile union, and in The Pursuit of Italy he makes a persuasive (if not entirely unfamiliar) argument that the 1861 unification of the country, trumpeted by nationalists as a triumph of progressive statecraft, was a mistake

The book that explains the whole extraordinary course of Italian history like no other in English The Pursuit of Italytraces the .

The book that explains the whole extraordinary course of Italian history like no other in English The Pursuit of Italytraces the whole history of the Italian peninsula in a wonderfully readable style, full of well-chosen stories and observations from personal experience, and peopled by many of the great figures of the Italian past, from Cicero and Virgil to Dante and the Medici, from Cavour and Verdi to the controversial political figures of the twentieth century.

The Pursuit of Italy book. The Pursuit of Italy traces the whole history of the Italian. Gilmour shows that the glory of Italy has always lain in its regions, with their distinctive art, civic cultures, identities and cuisine and whose inhabitants identified themselves not as Italians, but as Tuscans and Venetians, Sicilians and Lombards, Neapolitans and Genoese. This is where the strength and culture of Italy still comes from, rather than from misconceived and mishandled concepts of nationalism and unity.

The Pursuit of Italy. A History of a Land, its Regions and their Peoples. an imprint of. Penguin books. Published by the Penguin Group. The early chapters in this book do not pretend to be a history of the 2,000 years before Napoleon Bonaparte pounced on Italy and created havoc in 1796; rather they are a chronological sketch that attempts to identify the diversities and centrifugal inclinations in Italian history and to assess the way they influenced the course of the peninsula’s more recent history.

Did Garibaldi do Italy a disservice when he helped its disparate parts achieve unity? Was the goal of political unification a mis-take? The question is asked and answered in a number of ways in this engaging, original consideration of the many histories that contribute to the brilliance-and weakness-of Italy today. 13 people like this topic.

Электронная книга "The Pursuit of Italy: A History of a Land, Its Regions, and Their Peoples", David Gilmour

Электронная книга "The Pursuit of Italy: A History of a Land, Its Regions, and Their Peoples", David Gilmour. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Pursuit of Italy: A History of a Land, Its Regions, and Their Peoples" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Gilmour shows that the glory of Italy has always lain in its regions, with their distinctive art, civic cultures, identities, and cuisines.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Gilmour shows that the glory of Italy has always lain in its regions, with their distinctive art, civic cultures, identities, and cuisines. Italy's inhabitants identified themselves not as Italians but as Tuscans and Venetians, Sicilians and Lombards, Neapolitans and Genoese. Italy's strength and culture still come from its regions rather than from its misconceived, mishandled notion of a unified nation.

A provocative, entertaining account of Italy's diverse riches, its hopes and dreams, its past and present

Did Garibaldi do Italy a disservice when he helped its disparate parts achieve unity? Was the goal of political unification a mistake? The question is asked and answered in a number of ways in The Pursuit of Italy, an engaging, original consideration of the many histories that contribute to the brilliance―and weakness―of Italy today.

David Gilmour's wonderfully readable exploration of Italian life over the centuries is filled with provocative anecdotes as well as personal observations, and is peopled by the great figures of the Italian past―from Cicero and Virgil to the controversial politicians of the twentieth century. His wise account of the Risorgimento debunks the nationalistic myths that surround it, though he paints a sympathetic portrait of Giuseppe Verdi, a beloved hero of the era.

Gilmour shows that the glory of Italy has always lain in its regions, with their distinctive art, civic cultures, identities, and cuisines. Italy's inhabitants identified themselves not as Italians but as Tuscans and Venetians, Sicilians and Lombards, Neapolitans and Genoese. Italy's strength and culture still come from its regions rather than from its misconceived, mishandled notion of a unified nation.


Shan
Italy is a country with a rich and diverse history. Which is partly why this book was a little overwhelming to read. There was so much information that it was hard to follow/absorb all the facts that were being thrown at me. It was an ambitious ask to put the entire history of Italy in one 400 page book. And I think attempting that made it so I felt at times like I was reading a list of facts instead of a story. Certain chapters provided more in-depth coverage (notably the opera chapter, specifically the information on Verdi) which made me wish that the author had decided to do this more often. Instead of getting into everything, I would have love him to pick and choose his spots to focus on.

Overall, this is an informative book that provides insight in why the unification of Italy wasn't greeted with enthusiasm by its own citizens.
Jorius
Very interesting "behind the scenes" look at Italy, its history, culture and political development. Having visited Italy several times in the last 10 years, this was quite an eye-opener for the casual traveler. Unfortunately, the ending is somewhat pessimistic regarding the future for this otherwise wonderful country. And events in Italy that have occurred since the book was published do nothing to contradict the conclusions of the author. Now I understand why my Italian language teacher left his homeland 19 years ago and says he's not interested in every returning there to live.
Thordira
This delightfully coherent history of the country that in 1860 became the modern nation of Italy begins with the polyglot migrations into the Italian peninsula many centuries before the Christian era and ends with the chaotic premiership of Silvio Berlusconi. And what a ride it is!

The two things that I most enjoyed and admired about this superb overview of Italian history are, first, its coherence. From beginning to end, David Gilmour, the author, makes the case that Metternich, who in the early 19th century declared that Italy was not a nation, but rather a "geographic expression," was profoundly correct. For it is Gilmour'c conviction that what we now call the nation of Italy was and continues to be a mistake. Italy, in his persuasive view, ought not to be a single nation, but rather it would have fared far better as four five or six independent yet far more integrated and coherent countries such as Piedmont, Tuscany, Venezia, Sicily, the Southern half of the country, etc. Of course, no one will ever know whether Gilmore is right, but he does make an excellent case that Italy, as it is today, is not a coherently integrated and unified country. Far from it.

The second dimension of this fine book that I admire and enjoy is Gilmour's willingness to opine on all of Italy's leading men of the last 200 years. From Garibaldi, to Cavour, to Pius IX, to Verdi, to Victor Emanuel, to Mussolini, to De Gasperi, to Berlusconi - his perspectives and insights into each of these men (as well as many others) are always interesting and usually persuasive. Plus, his perspectives on the country as a whole are similarly engaging. As but one example, let me share with you his perspective on Italian nationalism, which he perceives to have had its emotive origins in a romantic harkoning back to the Roman Empire, but which in the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries caused nothing but hardship and devastation to the people of the country. Happily, by reason of these multiple historical disasters, Italy today has abjured itself of all nationalistic pretension.

Bottom-line, it is a pleasure for me, as an ardent admirer of Italy and of Italian culture, to recommend this book to one and all.
Marad
Gilmour's pursuit is ambitious both in scope and intent, covering Italy's land, regions and people from Ancient Rome to the Berlusconi administrations in a tightly written 400 pages. He cautions that since this is not an academic work (although 376 source books are cited in the text), he has allowed himself "to be quirkily subjective in (his) selection of topics."

The author begins with a discussion of Italy's defining geographic features: too long; easily invaded; divided from north to south and from east to west; lacking in timber, fish, fishermen, sailors and navigable rivers; malaria prone and multi-racial. Gimour proceeds to review almost every important era of the peninsula's history from Imperial Rome through the Risorgimento and ending with a review of today's economic, social and political challenges. His approach is to analyze the country's centrifugal tendencies, arguing that more traditional histories "had been written from a centripetal view, as if Italian unity had been pre-ordained." Questioning whether unification had been either necessary or inevitable, Gilmour asks: "Were there not just too many Italies for a successful unity?"

Early portions of the text can be a bit challenging as the author weaves together the varied and complex historical threads of the Holy Roman Empire. The book takes off, however, in an extended and lucid description of the Risorgimento. Gilmour sees the latter resulting from a war of expansion conducted by the Piedmontese. "Annexation (of the Papal States and the Kingdom of The Two Sicilies) plainly meant 'piedmontization', the imposition of northern laws, customs and institutions on distant regions with no experience of their workings." The Kingdom of Italy was formally proclaimed in 1861 but, constitutionally, was a greatly expanded Piedmont with a new name. Venice and Rome fell into Italy's hands in 1866 and 1870 respectively more as the result of machinations between Austria, Prussia and France than through Italian military or political victories. In Gilmour's view, nationalist Italy was more imposition than evolution.

"Nearly a century and a half after unification - and more than sixty years after Mussolini's death - Italian politics had still been unable to settle into any kind of rhythm or consistency," concludes the author. Italy's birth rate, economic growth and EU compliance are at low points while its Corruption Index (according to Transparency International ranking) rises. The sense of national unity, Gilmour argues, has disappeared as Italians increasingly question the legitimacy of the state.

Countries such as Britain and France, observe Gilmour, are more important than the sum of their parts. Communal Italy, however, represented in its cities and regions, is the strength of the country and receives the true allegiance of its citizenry. The author quotes Luigi Barzini who stated that Italy "has never been as good as the sum of all her people." The reader is left to conclude that Gilmour agrees with Giustino Fortunato who declared in 1899 "that the unification of Italy was a sin against history and geography."

The Pursuit of Italy ends in a question about its efficacy as a unified nation, one thought to have been settled in the affirmative long ago. As a result, this book is entertaining and truly thought-provoking, which can't help but be a good combination.