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by Frank Delaney
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  • Author:
    Frank Delaney
  • ISBN:
    0061244430
  • ISBN13:
    978-0061244438
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    HARPER (February 5, 2008)
  • Pages:
    560 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Europe
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1140 kb
  • ePUB format
    1206 kb
  • DJVU format
    1703 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    894
  • Formats:
    doc mbr lit azw


Frank Delaney (24 October 1942 – 21 February 2017) was an Irish novelist, journalist and broadcaster.

Frank Delaney (24 October 1942 – 21 February 2017) was an Irish novelist, journalist and broadcaster. He was the author of The New York Times best-seller Ireland, the non-fiction book Simple Courage: A True Story of Peril on the Sea, and many other works of fiction, non-fiction and collections. He was born in Tipperary, Ireland. Delaney began working as a newsreader for the Irish state radio and television network RTÉ in 1970

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. In the winter of 1951, a storyteller, the last practitioner of an honored, centuries-old tradition.

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Ed Victor gave me the gift of writing this book and thus the opportunity to rediscover my own beloved country; he initiated the novel, waited for, guided, and guarded it. For that and for myriad other reasons, it is dedicated to him with great affection and gratitude.

HarperCollins, 15 февр. Frank Delaney was born in Tipperary, Ireland. A career in broadcasting earned him fame across the United Kingdom. A judge for the Booker Prize, several of his nonfiction books were bestsellers in the UK, and he writes frequently for American and British publications. He now lives with his wife, Diane Meier, in New York and Connecticut. Ireland is his first novel to be published in the United States.

Ireland is a novel about a Storyteller and the stories he tells about Irish history

It is as if Frank Delaney wrote his novel, Ireland, to be an audio book. Ireland is a novel about a Storyteller and the stories he tells about Irish history. We are treated to the creation of Newgrange and the Book of Kells. We learn about Brendan the Navigator and Conor, the King of Ulster. Each story stands alone but together they form still another story. I cannot recommend this book more highl. specially as an audio book.

In this gloriously absorbing and utterly satisfying novel, a man’s passion for the woman he loves is twinned with his country’s emergence as a nation.

My wooing began in passion, was defined by violence and circumscribed by land; all these elements molded my soul. So writes Charles O’Brien, the unforgettable hero of bestselling author Frank Delaney’s extraordinary new novel–a sweeping epic of obsession, profound devotion, and compelling history involving a turbulent era that would shape modern Ireland. Born into a respected Irish-Anglo family in 1860, Charles loves his native land and its long-suffering but irrepressible people. In this gloriously absorbing and utterly satisfying novel, a man’s passion for the woman he loves is twinned with his country’s emergence as a nation.

Электронная книга "Ireland: A Novel", Frank Delaney. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Ireland: A Novel" для чтения в офлайн-режиме. In the winter of 1951, a storyteller, the last practitioner of an honored, centuries-old tradition, arrives at the home of nine-year-old Ronan O'Mara in the Irish countryside. For three wonderful evenings, the old gentleman enthralls his assembled local audience with narratives of foolish kings, fabled saints, and Ireland's enduring accomplishments before moving on.

Frank Delaney is the author of eight novels, as well as several non-fiction books (including James . He has been a judge for both the Booker and Whitbread prizes and chairman of the Book Trust.

Frank Delaney is the author of eight novels, as well as several non-fiction books (including James Joyce's Odyssey) and a number of screenplays. 1. Ulysses by James Joyce. Obviously Ulysses has to be first

Frank Delaney is the author of the New York Times bestselling novel Ireland, as well as The Last Storyteller, The Matchmaker of Kenmare, Venetia Kelly’s Traveling Show, Tipperary, Shannon, and Simple Courage: A True Story of Peril on the Sea. A former judge for the Man Booker Prize.

Frank Delaney is the author of the New York Times bestselling novel Ireland, as well as The Last Storyteller, The Matchmaker of Kenmare, Venetia Kelly’s Traveling Show, Tipperary, Shannon, and Simple Courage: A True Story of Peril on the Sea. A former judge for the Man Booker Prize, Delaney enjoyed a prominent career in BBC broadcasting before becoming a full-time writer. Delaney died in 2017.

Yazar: Frank Delaney. Parts of the book were very interesting, but overall the tales didn't make a comprehensive novel. Frank Delaney spins a wonderful yarn about Ireland. The story consists of a series of stories with a surprise ending

Yazar: Frank Delaney. Google Play'de Kitap Satın Alın. Would have been better presented as a collection of short stories. Tam incelemeyi okuyun. The story consists of a series of stories with a surprise ending. I liked reading as well as listening to it. Delaney has a lovely voice, very Irish. Kullanıcı Değerlendirmesi - maryreinert - LibraryThing. What a pleasure to read!

In the winter of 1951, a storyteller, the last practitioner of an honored, centuries-old tradition, arrives at the home of nine-year-old Ronan O'Mara in the Irish countryside. For three wonderful evenings, the old gentleman enthralls his assembled local audience with narratives of foolish kings, fabled saints, and Ireland's enduring accomplishments before moving on. But these nights change young Ronan forever, setting him on a years-long pursuit of the elusive, itinerant storyteller and the glorious tales that are no less than the saga of his tenacious and extraordinary isle.


Darksinger
My wife and I just returned from a wonderful visit to the Emerald Isle. What a wonderful 2 weeks! Reading this wonderful book, both before and after our visit, was monumentally useful for us. In the magnificent flow of the storyteller, Frank Delaney takes you on a magical trip through both fact and fiction in this novel come alive. I found that my understanding of what I experienced was so much enhanced using the book as a sort of accompaniment piece. I encourage you to read it for the simple pleasure of doing so, but also as an enticement to visit the country if you've not already done so; or as a wonderful refreshing of your memories if you have.
Anarius
IRELAND, the country and place of my ancestry is and always has been a mystery to me. IRELAND, the novel turned that mystery into magic and deepened my love of the country, our people, their will and strength, wit and power and their beautiful, unique perspective on the world. I laughed and I was saddened, I learned and re-learned. But most of all I fell in love.
Kashicage
Ronan O’Mara is a nine-year old boy who lives in rural Ireland with his mother, father, and aunt. The year is 1951. One day, a mysterious stranger – an older man – appears at the doorstep. Who is he? We don’t know. We know his visit is expected. Neighbors come over, and the stranger tells the family and their neighbors a story. Several stories actually. It seems this is the gift of the stranger. A storyteller. Ronan wishes the man could stay forever, but his impatient mother feels he’s outstayed his welcome after a few days, and the stranger leaves. There’s something about this man that has touched Ronan’s soul though, and Ronan can’t rest easy with the stranger no longer in his life. So Ronan begins a twelve year quest to find the stranger.

Now, before I go further, let’s go back to the stories that the old man told Ronan and company. These stories are quite a pleasant diversion from our “main” story. The stories that the stranger tells are about the people’s homeland and history -the history of Ireland. True, there’s a lot of myth, fable, and tradition within these yarns, but the storyteller knows how to enrapture an audience. It doesn’t surprise us in the least that Ronan can’t rest until he finds out where the man is after he leaves. At the very least, it would be nice to find out who he is.
Reading this wonderful novel allows you to suspend any sort of disbelief you may have. Is it really common to invite a complete stranger into your house for a week simply because he can tell stories? Is this man even real? Or is he a figment of young Ronan’s imagination? Does the existence of this character serve only to aid Ronan discover his destiny? Good stories really are rare, and Frank Delaney simply entertains us to the point that we simply don’t want to add too much logic within the pages we’re reading. These stories of Ireland that are juxtaposed through the pages are simply wonderful tales, and many times altogether too brief.

As Ronan embarks on his journey, he seems to be forever one or two steps behind the storyteller. But this doesn’t stop Ronan from hearing more of the stranger’s stories. Wherever Ronan goes, it seems he’s allowed to hear more stories from the stranger in many different forms. Sometimes, he hears the stories secondhand. Other times, the story teller leaves Ronan written tales that the storyteller composed for him to enjoy. It seems the stranger knows Ronan might be searching for him.

What makes this novel more pleasurable as that we also get to know Ronan and his family quite well. Had these extra tales not been thrown into the main storyline, this still would have been a terrific book. Ronan, like all of us, has his own life to live, and as the story progresses, we learn more about his own personal history and the events that shape his character. So maybe a great way to describe this book is “several wonderful stories told within a story”.
Although this book takes place in Ireland and all of the stories are about Ireland’s history, the overall feel is quite light. This isn’t a densely packed James Michener type of book. I feel that had author Frank Delaney wanted to write such a book, he could have easily done so, however. But overall, this book is rather light on the historical narratives of the country. The main objective here is Ronan, and his quest to find his calling.

I loved this book. As someone who reads quite a bit of fiction, I never take great writing for granted. The story is the point of a good book, but more important is how the author tells the story. How else could John Grisham become so popular? On the surface, dozens of books about the law profession don’t sound very exciting, but Grisham is a great storyteller.

And so is Frank Delaney. After reading this book (Summer 2018) I was sad to discover that Mr. Delaney passed away about a year ago. Fortunately, he has several other books that he penned (all seem to be somewhat related to Ireland), and I’m eagerly looking forward to reading more by this author.
INvait
Some great novelists such as f Scott Fitzgerald chisel their narrative out of limestone word by word adjective by adverb to stand as a work of art relating one persons perspective. This novelist is like a vantriloquist who channels many individual persons selves, leaving the reader to feel having well met them all. The author uses an artists hand to scoop and swirl numerous media into a collage with tiny mirror shards reflecting historic facts. Being just a humble reader without degrees to hamper my experience, I will always consider this novel unique and absolutely one of my most cherished reads.
Dagdarad
I was fortunate to be able to take a trip to Ireland this February and absolutely fell in love with the country and the people. Since then I've been reading everything I can get my hands on about the country and found this charming book. Mr. Delaney is an incredible writer and he weaves the history of Ireland with 1960s Cork using the vehicle of the last Storyteller, even managing to toss in a mystery. I'm half Irish so I was predisposed to like the book, but still. It's one of the best books I've ever read and I highly recommend it.
Perdana
What an engaging story! I grew up in the South, where many Scots-Irish migrated to, where storytelling and music is part of the culture. Delaney's IRELAND is a story within a story. We follow a young lad who becomes obsessed by the travelling storyteller who tells vivid fireside stories of the myths, legends, and history of Ireland. A rift ensues between the mother and the old storyteller, driving him away too soon and hurting the boy. The book follows the storyteller as the boy follows the storyteller as he grows up. I found myself looking up certain stories told and found they were based on real events in Ireland. This book is one that you can immerse yourself in!
Adaly
I really liked this book. The author has such a poetic way with words. It's a tale, set in the pre-television era, of a young Irish lad who becomes obsessed with a traveling story-teller, and the lengths he goes to in order to find the man. Along the way, the boy becomes a story-teller himself. Included in the tale are many stories of Ireland's history over hundreds of years. The reader is swept away into the past and becomes a part of the story. Definitely recommend this one.
Phenomenal book by Frank Delaney takes us on a journey that educates, intrigues and amazes. This is a perfect read for any Irish descendent who now is living and raising their family in a new and different country. As an Irish American or is the Irish would say an American who happens to have Irish ancestors there is a saying that is often said- and that saying is:"without knowing one's roots one can never have wings". Never has this been more true than for Irish-Americans while we are planted here gratefully, and are proud to be Americans , we also equally fiercely proud and acknowledge our Irish roots.