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by Bruce A. Posey,Daniel J. Mosley
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Programming
  • Author:
    Bruce A. Posey,Daniel J. Mosley
  • ISBN:
    0130084689
  • ISBN13:
    978-0130084682
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Prentice Hall; 1 edition (July 25, 2002)
  • Pages:
    288 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Programming
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1968 kb
  • ePUB format
    1868 kb
  • DJVU format
    1579 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    211
  • Formats:
    txt mbr mobi rtf


Just Enough Test Automation is a practical, hands-on guide to software test automation from the perspective of test .

Just Enough Test Automation is a practical, hands-on guide to software test automation from the perspective of test developers and users. Two leading software testing consultants offer real-world dos and don'ts for designing and implementing test automation with pragmatic advice on what today's most popular approaches to automated testing can and can't accomplish.

by Bruce A. Posey, Daniel J. Mosley. Publisher: Prentice Hall. Release Date: July 2002. Just Enough Test Automation is a practical, hands-on guide to software test automation from the perspective of test developers and users. Coverage includes: Setting realistic expectations: knowing when and what to automate. Planning for automated testing.

Just Enough Test Automation shows test developers and users how to design, implement, and manage software test automation. Learn from authors Dan Mosley and Bruce Posey how to implement a powerful data-driven testing framework; automate unit testing, integrate testing and system/regression testing; and facilitate manual testing with automated tools.

Just Enough Test Automation is a practical, hands-on guide to software . By Daniel J. Mosley, Bruce A. Posey. Published Jul 15, 2002 by Prentice Hall. Sorry, this book is no longer in print. The book also includes a complete sample automation project plan, covering documentation, implementation, the automation environment, roles, responsibilities, and much more. Online Sample Chapter. What Is Just Enough Test Automation? Table of Contents. What Is Just Enough Test Automation? No New Models, Please! A Life Cycle Is Not a Process.

This book is just enough for every test automation engineer. 3. Implementing Automated Software Testing: How to Save Time and Lower Costs While Raising Quality by Elfriede Dustin, Thom Garrett, and Bernie Gauf. Loved by every developer, from beginners to advanced-level automation test engineers, in this book you’ll learn what and when to automate, test requirements, creating a test case, automating unit testing, development of automation test script, automated integration testing, automated regression testing, and a huge mountain of automation-related topics.

The Just Enough Software Test Automation by Daniel J. Mosley and Bruce A. This book is just enough for every test automation engineer. One of the best books that are loved by beginners to advanced level automation test engineers

The Just Enough Software Test Automation by Daniel J. One of the best books that are loved by beginners to advanced level automation test engineers. In this book you’ll learn what and when to automate, test requirements, creating a test case, automating unit testing, development of automation test script, automated integration testing, automated regression testing, and a huge mountain of automation. oceedings{Mosley2002JustES, title {Just Enough Software Test Automation}, author {Daniel J. Mosley and Bruce Posey}, year {2002} }. Daniel J. Mosley, Bruce Posey. Two leading software testing consultants offer real-world dos and don'ts for designing and implementing test automation infrastructure—along with pragmatic advice on what today's most popular approaches to automated testing can and can't accomplish.

Mosley, Daniel . Posey, Bruce (2002). Just Enough Software Test Automation. Kaner, Cem, "Architectures of Test Automation", August 2000. Practical Experience in Automated Testing. Test Automation: Delivering Business Value.

Software Test Automation – Effective Use of Test Execution Tools (If you can only get one book on automation, this is. .Case studies and countless other essential topics.

Software Test Automation – Effective Use of Test Execution Tools (If you can only get one book on automation, this is the book I would grab). This book covers all the key automation concepts, including: Principles for good automation script. Has a great introduction to the different types of keywords and data-driven approaches with code examples, albeit using slightly dated test tool technology.

Just Enough Test Automation shows test developers and users how to design, implement, and manage software test automation. Learn from authors Dan Mosley and Bruce Posey how to implement a powerful data-driven testing framework; automate unit testing, integrate testing and system/regression testing; and facilitate manual testing with automated tools.

Kagaramar
I purchased this text while researching automated testing for my Master's paper. Mosley and Posey focus on the pragmatic aspects of implementing automated testing. Since the focus of my paper was on justifying software testing automation, I particularly apprectiated their straight forward arithmetic on tool justification. However, they go even further to address where the cost justification actually exists in areas where it may not be as obvious. This book, however, does not put a great deal of emphasis on the administrative methodology surrounding software development. It tells you this up front and addresses key success factors to implementing automated testing (ie don't automate the testing of something that's not completed or working.)
The only quirk I found in the book was the diatribe against the benefit of CMM or knowledge of other models. I understand their point, which is that these models don't really add value to the hands on aspect of testing or developing software. However, from personal experience, I have seen a greater tendency in developers to consider many of the points they make if their background includes an appreciation for the types of things that should happen in a mature organization.
Opilar
This book is written for the in-the-trenches testing practitioner. Before describing the book and its strengths, I need to state that the authors' views of certain aspects of software engineering dramatically differ from kine. Specifically, they express some disdain for applying a life cycle approach to testing in general and test automation in particular, and also don't seem to see the value of maturity frameworks, such as the CMM. On the other hand, they are forthright about their focus on the practitioner, and are strong proponents of process. My views differ from theirs in that I see the value of bounding processes within a life cycle flow, and also see the value in measuring capability. While my perspective may not be meaningful to the practitioner who is actually doing the testing, it does take into account the realities of managing an IT organization.
Regardless of my opinions and views, the authors have put together a powerful, sensible approach to test automation. Key strengths include:
- Pragmatism, including compelling counter arguments to my own views (especially in the first two chapters titled "What Is Just Enough Test Automation?" and "Knowing When and What to Automate". I particularly liked the distinctions between processes, and life cycles and tools.
- Going straight to the critical success factors, such as requirements as the entire basis for test planning, and ensuring traceability throughout the development life cycle. In addition, the frank discussion of limitations of some testing tools, and the associated high maintenance associated with scripts, is illuminating. I also liked the way that the book shows what can be automated, and, more importantly, what cannot (or should not) be. It also reemphasizes the importance of developing a test strategy and test plans, and how automation tools fall short in some areas. An invaluable part of this aspect of the book is the discussion of test scripting languages and their strengths and weaknesses.
- Examples based on real tools, with an emphasis on Rational's TestStudio. Mercury Interactive's WinRunner is also used to illustrate key concepts of the Test Plan Driven framework that is discussed later in the book.
- Material that hands-on practitioners can use. While I have a high regard for the Automated Test Lifecycle Methodology that is proposed in an excellent book titled "Automated Software Testing" by Elfriede Dustin, Jeff Rashka, John Paul, that book is more for implementing and managing automated testing within the context of a life cycle, and isn't a topic to which the audience of this book will relate. Indeed, the real strength of this book is the fact that no other book on automated testing talks to the practitioners. In addition, the material covers unit, integration, and regression testing from the practitioner's point of view.
- Advanced topics including data-driven approaches to testing that ties into automated suites, hybrid approaches that combine manual and automated elements, and how to develop test plans and associated artifacts.
Despite my disagreement with some of what the authors views, I have to give this book my highest endorsement because, in my opinion, it's well thought out, provides one of the most thorough discussions of test automation at the practitioner level I've encountered, and is technically flawless.
Adrierdin
"Purchasing a software testing tool suite does not constitute implementing a software process". Wise words from Dan Mosley and Bruce Posey in "Just Enough Software Test Automation"; maybe some development managers need to take heed.
Too many times have automated test tools become shelfware, or the cost of maintaining the scripts prohibitvely expensive. The authors of this book offer a simple and easy to use data-driven framework that can minimise scripts and human effort. They place their framework within the Rational Unified Process (RUP).
The book offers actual and detailed advice that goes all the way down to code and script templates. Based mostly on Rational tools, the book gives lip service to Winrunner and anything said can be translated to any automated tool.
Their open-source framework is the Control Synchronized Data Driven Testing(CSDDT). Data to be input, keywords to navigate through the application and actions to be performed are held in the spreadsheet. There are four main scripts: A Main script that reads and processes the records; a window selection script, a tab selection script, an action script and error handling script. Data input is held in an array and there is a comment field that documents the test record. Your application code is held in a switch statement, and it is highly conceivable that your project can have single figure script numbers. There is also a script that converts the spreadsheet data in a .csv file that is read by the Main script. There is detailed
information given on how to implement the CSDDT. It is a framework I use and am pleased with.
There are two interesting chapters on Unit and Integration testing. Like eXtreme Programmers they believe in automating unit tests that pass at 100% before submitting for build. They correctly argue that unit tests should be constructed before development code is written and they also point to the xUnit group of tools.
They make insightful points about the necessity of integration testing: Could you not help but identify with the following statements: "... We have seen two chronic problems: First, the build fequently does not install on system test machines. Second, the fact that unit and integration testing has not been done previously forces the system test team to do tests that development should have already executed." Again they also argue for automated integration testing else "it will not get done."
I feel however that Mosley and Posey's ideas need to be infused with agile values and practices. For example do we really need improved software requirements documentation, verbose Test Plans and meticulous test design when requirements change so much? Do we really need all these Rational tools and the time it takes to use and update them? Can we not make automated functional tests an integral part of requirements? What about Pair Test Programming? How are we going to increase oral communication? Is devolopment and test a false dichotomy? These kind of issues also need to be addressed as we begin to construct software in a radically different way.