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Download C# For Experienced Programmers (Deitel Developer Series) fb2

by Harvey M. Deitel,Paul J. Deitel,Jeffrey A. Listfield,Tem R. Nieto,Cheryl H. Yaeger,Marina Zlatkina
Download C# For Experienced Programmers (Deitel Developer Series) fb2
Programming
  • Author:
    Harvey M. Deitel,Paul J. Deitel,Jeffrey A. Listfield,Tem R. Nieto,Cheryl H. Yaeger,Marina Zlatkina
  • ISBN:
    0130461334
  • ISBN13:
    978-0130461339
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Prentice Hall PTR (July 25, 2002)
  • Pages:
    1456 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Programming
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1970 kb
  • ePUB format
    1288 kb
  • DJVU format
    1728 kb
  • Rating:
    4.1
  • Votes:
    208
  • Formats:
    docx mobi doc azw


C for Experienced Programmers is written for programmers with backgrounds in C++, Visual Basic, Java . I bought this book because I used the C++ book by Deitel and Deitel 10 years ago, and I still use it for reference. That was a great book, this is just awful.

If you already own C How To Program, 1/e, you should not purchase C for Experienced Programmers. However, you may be interested in our ASP. NET with C for Experienced Programmers, which will be published in Summer 2003. Students should not purchase C for Experienced Programmers.

Written as an introduction to the new C this guide takes the experienced C programmer a few steps beyond the .

Written as an introduction to the new C this guide takes the experienced C programmer a few steps beyond the basics. It covers objects, data types, and flow control, and even delves into some background on the new Microsoft NET Frameworks environment. It also offers a comparison between C C++, Visual Basic, and Java.

Harvey M. Deitel, Paul J. Dietel, Jeffrey A. Listfield, Tem R. Nieto, Cheryl H. Yaeger, Marina Zlatkina. Completely updated to reflect the recent changes in ANSI Standard C++. Contains hundreds of exercises, and thousands of lines of working code with valuable insights into good programming practices. Скачать (pdf, 1. 0 Mb). It covers objects, data types, and flow control, and even delves into some background on the new Microsoft NET Frameworks environment

Written as an introduction to the new C this guide takes the experienced C programmer a few steps beyond the basics. Categories: Computers\Programming.

Full recovery of all data can take up to 2 weeks! So we came to the decision at this time to double the download limits for all users until the problem is completely resolved. Deitel and Paul J. Deitel are the founders of Deitel & Associates, In. the internationally recognized IT content-creation and corporate-training organization. C for Experienced Programmers contains a rich collection of examples that have been tested on Windows 2000 and Windows XP. The book concentrates on the principles of good software engineering and stresses program clarity. We are educators who teach topics in industry classrooms worldwide. Deitel, Jeffrey A. Yaeger, Marina Zlatkina - A programmer's introduction to C.Harvey M. Deitel, Tem R. Nieto, Ted Lin, Praveen Sadhu

Harvey M. Yaeger, Marina Zlatkina - A programmer's introduction to C Harvey M. Nieto, Ted Lin, Praveen Sadhu. Читать pdf. Nieto, Ted Lin, Praveen Sadhu - XML How to Program.

C For Experienced Programmers. Deitel, Deitel & Associates, In. Deitel & Associates, Inc. Paul J. Jeffrey A. Listfield. The authors present key C concepts in the context of fully-tested programs, complete with syntax highlighting, detailed line-by-line descriptions, and program outputs.

Jeffrey A. In C For Experienced Programmers, a team of world-renowned corporate trainers deliver an advanced guide to C specifically focused on the features that give experienced programmers the greatest power. Harvey and Paul Deitel, whose best-selling textbooks have trained millions of developers worldwide, teach C most powerful features using their unique LIVE-CODE "TM" approach: every new concept is presented in the context of a complete, working example, immediately followed by windows showing exactly what the code does.

Explains how to develop .NET software with the C# language and the framework class library (FCL). The team of six authors first walks through the C# structure of methods and arrays, classes and objects, inheritance, polymorphism, exception handling, the graphical user interface, multithreading, graphics, and files. The second half of the guide introduces XML, ADO.NET, ASP.NET, streams-based sockets, and the mobile internet tool kit. Much of the material is derived from the C# how to program textbook. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

X-MEN
Great book at a great price. I am glad I found this site to get it on. It was going for so much more at school
Sharpbinder
Good book and fast shipping
Warianys
I bought this book because I used the C++ book by Deitel and Deitel 10 years ago, and I still use it for reference. That was a great book, this is just awful. Except for the first few chapters on language semantics, the book is a horrible mish-mash of Developer Studio auto-generated code, with the author partly trying to explain the auto-generated code and partly trying to explain concepts. I wanted to learn the semantics of ADO.NET. Didn't get very far, because the book wants to describe how to drag and drop controls from the ToolBox to create OleDBConnections. Then I tried taking the other approach - I sat with Developer Studio in front of me and tried following what the author was trying to explain - didn't get very far on that either - because there is no description of how to use the datagrid. You are sort of left off in the middle! The datagrid is explained very briefly in another chapter on ASPX - not helpful when you are trying to learn ADO. This is sort of true for almost every chapter in the book.

The book might have been a good one had the author stuck to one approach - raw code OR just an explanation of how to use the IDE.

I would strongly recommend against buying this book. Get the O'Reilly book by Jason Liberty - thats a really good book on language semantics that is very clean, crisp and explains the idiosyncracies of the language very nicely - with little notes on how things are different from Java and C++. Even the $10 "C# Complete" book by Sybex is a better buy than this (I have that too, and enjoyed reading it much more than this).
Perdana
It's true. This is not an in depth book by any stretch, suprising given the title and the 1300 page volume. However, it's an extensive "How to" book. It covers many areas of .NET and provides, as another reviewer pointed out, a jump-start by showing you how to at least start, all the while providing many useful tips. If you buy the book with that in mind, you're going to be pleased, because given the number of topics covered it does a good job of getting you started on any of them. I don't believe any book on .NET can cover so many topics in depth. For instance, take the fine explanation of AutoEventWireUp in this book, a property that you are likely to see in all VS.NET generated ASP.NET pages, and look for an equivalent explanation in your own ASP.NET book. Two of the four highly rated ASP.NET books I own do not provide ANY explanation of this important property, and the other has an incomplete description.
Having read about a dozen .NET books, it's obvious that the subject is so vast and revolutionary that many authors are unable to provide full coverage even when they focus on one of the three main technologies. Even the best focused books will leave critical holes in your knowledge, even more so when they try to cover many topics in depth. With that in mind, the author of this book has chosen a different startegy, one of covering many topics with rudimentary explanations of key concepts, tips, and a multitude of examples to at least get you going and thinking in the right direction.
Read "C# Primer Plus" first, then read this book, then "Application Development Using C# and .NET". Then you can branch off on any number of possible directions with 2-4 additional books on the subject of your interest. Don't expect one or two or three to cover all that you are going to need to know!
Thozius
According to the authors the intended audience for this book is experienced programmers who want an in depth coverage of the material and very little if any introductory material. Sounds great, doesn't it? What they should have said was that the book is for experienced programmers who have never used Windows and never heard of, let alone used, an object oriented language. I guess they wrote this for experienced Unix shell programmers.
From the beginning of the text I was very disappointed to learn that their `deep' coverage included explaining things such as mouse clicks, double mouse clicks, how to move scroll bars in a window, and what all of those icons at the top of the IDE are (the toolbars). I found the rest of the text to be very repetitive, redundant, and they said the same things over and over again and again - not only that but they said the same things over and over, get it? At some points it was almost insulting to find out what they considered an experienced programmer didn't know. If you really are an experienced programmer then most of the first two chapters can be ignored, things like the history of the Internet are not needed as they've been covered in almost every beginner book already. About the only useful part would be the introduction to the IDE itself.
After the first couple of chapters it does get better and less demeaning but is still very repetitive, sentences like, "Allowing the IDE to create this code saves the programmer considerable development time. If the IDE did not provide the code, the programmer would have to write it, which would require a considerable amount of time." Are scattered throughout the book, often entire paragraphs repeat entire preceding paragraphs.
The book does have a lot of code examples to illustrate the current topic however a lot of it could be eliminated: as an experienced programmer the reader should know what a for loop is and a while loop. A simple explanation of how they work in C# would have sufficed. The full-blown code examples that they give, along with detailed explanations of the code, are just wasted. If you're an experienced programmer then you also don't need the 5-page (5 page!!!) example of how to calculate compound interest that is better suited to a beginner's book. Just tell me how to use the various structures in C# and then give me some detail on the advanced topics. The authors seem to have tried to write a book for every possible type of experienced programmer and in doing so have added quite a bit of material that simply isn't need for the majority of them. They made the book appealing to a very narrow audience of `experienced programmers'. In fact, with a little bit more introductory material, this would be an excellent beginner book. In the over 1300 pages of text the authors do cover a lot of material, the problem is that, had it been written concisely, or written to the audience that they specified, it would have been half of the size it currently is.
The material coverage seemed superficial and ill explained. I honestly did not enjoy reading this book; at times I was genuinely insulted by some of the explanations and code samples.