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Download HP-UX 10.X System Administration "How To" Book fb2

by Marty Poniatowski
Download HP-UX 10.X System Administration "How To" Book fb2
Operating Systems
  • Author:
    Marty Poniatowski
  • ISBN:
    0131258737
  • ISBN13:
    978-0131258730
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Prentice Hall; 1 edition (October 16, 1995)
  • Subcategory:
    Operating Systems
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1683 kb
  • ePUB format
    1625 kb
  • DJVU format
    1157 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
  • Votes:
    302
  • Formats:
    mbr lrf txt lrf


HP-UX 1. System Administration covers tasks all system administrators need to perform: It shows you how to perform each .

HP-UX 1. System Administration covers tasks all system administrators need to perform: It shows you how to perform each task, tells why you are doing it, and how it is affecting your system. Much of the knowledge I have gained has come from the fine HP-UX manual set and the concise online manual pages. With the HP-UX 1. System Administration "How To" Book, Poniatowski offers administrators an excellent guide and a necessary reference, designed specifically for the HP-UX administrator. 6 people found this helpful.

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Marty Poniatowski is an extraordinary author, specializing in HP-UX administration; he not only writes well, but he also works with HP-UX technically.

This manual is normally printed from the HP-UX 1. CDROM. Marty Poniatowski is an extraordinary author, specializing in HP-UX administration; he not only writes well, but he also works with HP-UX technically. In the HP-UX 1. System Administration "How To" Book, he provides the latest developments and also notes the sections of it that haven't changed in a practical and understandable style.

For HP-UX system administrators and end-users. HP-UX 1. is the latest version of the UNIX implementation from Hewlett-Packard, and eventually all HP-UX users will be moving up to this new platform. Covers system setup and advanced networking topics, HP-UX 1.

This book covers system administration specifically for HP-UX. is the latest version of the UNIX implementation from Hewlett-Packard, and eventually all HP-UX users will be moving up to this new platform

HP-UX 1. Covers system setup and advanced networking topics, plus many topics that are singular to HP-UX, including System Administration Manager (SAM), HP user interfaces (VUE and CDE), and HP Glance Plus/UX. For HP-UX system administrators and end-users. System Administration "How To" Book. HP-UX System Administration Handbook and Toolkit. Year: 2004 Pages: 100. Authors: Marty Poniatowski. Strategies for Information Technology Governance. HP-UX CSA: Official Study Guide and Desk Reference.

When it comes to HP-UX system administration, nobody has more experience than Marty Poniatowski. All you need for smarter, more effective HP-UX system administration! When it comes to HP-UX system administration, nobody has more experience than Marty Poniatowski. In this book, he delivers advanced coverage of today's hottest system administration issues, plus an amazing library of state-of-the-art tools for HP-UX sysadmins!

Are you sure you want to remove HP-UX 1. System Administration "How To" Book from your list?

HP-UX 1. System Administration "How To" Book Close. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove HP-UX 1. System Administration "How To" Book from your list? HP-UX 1. by Marty Poniatowski. Published October 16, 1995 by Prentice Hall PTR.

HP-UX 10.X is the latest version of the UNIX implementation from Hewlett-Packard, and eventually all HP-UX users will be moving up to this new platform. This book is the only HP-UX 10.X system administration book available — written in the popular "How To" style by the author of the highly successful guide to HP-UX 9.0. Covers system setup and advanced networking topics, plus many topics that are singular to HP-UX, including System Administration Manager (SAM), HP user interfaces (VUE and CDE), and HP Glance Plus/UX. For HP-UX system administrators and end-users.

Vikus
I love HP/UX and I love HP hardware. HP/UX is a neat UNIX version that has a lot of great features and is rock solid, and HP hardware is built like the proverbial brick outhouse. The problem is that despite the quality of their OS and hardware the documentation for HP systems hoovers the tool. The Poniatowski book is a prime example of this, I suppose that this book is marginally better than having no documentation at all and if I were trapped on a desert island and knew nothing about UNIX I could use this book to set up a rudimentary HP/UX system and I could then use the pages for something more useful such as starting fires or wiping my bum. So what are the problems with this book. Well let's list them in no particular order. 1) An entire chapter is devoted to bourne shell programming. Why? There are better books out there that will teach you shell programming. 2) An entire chapter is devoted to teaching you how to program in csh. Quite frankly I'm embarassed to admit that I used to use csh and was horrified when I was forced to use sh. But therapy, and beatings from more seasoned administrators, cured me and now I can't imagine why I would want to do any systems administration task in csh or use it as my login shell. Quite frankly teaching someone how to perform systems administration tasks with csh is like teaching someone how to perform first aid with leeches and bloodletting. 3) Hundreds of pages in this book are reprints of man pages. I suppose that this might be useful if I were sitting around and playing Trivial Pursuit one night and one of the topics was "Obscure HP/UX command switches" and I wasn't near a terminal, but other than that it's quite useless. If I need man pages I can go online and type "man <subject>" and UNIX will give me all of the information I need. Why reprint this unless you are trying to pad your book? 4) A lot of the pages are reprints of screen shots, OK, you need some, but this is excessive, again, more padding. If you need HP documentation see if you can lay hands on the manuals that HP educational services hands out with their courses. They are quite full featured and have exercises that you can work your way through to learn the system. If you need more generalized UNIX documentation purchase the red or purple books and a copy of UNIX Power Tools, that would be money far better spent than buying this book.
Not-the-Same
Every operating system currently in use is like quicksilver; they keep evolving, adding new features and interfaces, while maintaining their original structure. System administrators need to recognize this attribute, and learn the latest modifications as soon as possible. Marty Poniatowski is an extraordinary author, specializing in HP-UX administration; he not only writes well, but he also works with HP-UX technically. In the HP-UX 11.x System Administration "How To" Book, he provides the latest developments and also notes the sections of it that haven't changed in a practical and understandable style.
Poniatowski details both ways of administrating the HP-UX system. Administrators are divided about the best way to achieve results; some prefer the shell interface (SAM), while others maintain the "old-fashioned" way of the command line interface. Poniatowski covers both approaches, emphasizing that shell users must know the underlying commands, just in case that the system and SAM crash simultaneously. He presents the concepts, practices, and methods of HP-UX in a logical and understandable way. His discussion of system setup and configuration allow readers with varying levels of experience to thoroughly understand the process. The inclusion of the referenced man pages at the end of each chapter provides a time saving device for the reader, who may or may not have access to a computer while reading the book and who also may not remember the syntax of every command and option.
Poniatowski demonstrates the techniques of basic HP-UX administration for new administrators and shows experienced professionals how to improve existing procedures. This is an outstanding book for all HP-UX technical professionals by an knowledgeable and experienced administrator and author. With the HP-UX 11.x System Administration "How To" Book, Poniatowski offers administrators an excellent guide and a necessary reference, designed specifically for the HP-UX administrator.
Bedy
This book covered everything I need to know for HP-UX system administration
Topics are covered at an introductory level first and then the advanced level. I got the information I needed to know about tasks you perform when starting out such as installation, basic system administration, and an intro to shell programming, then advanced topics such as performance commands and Ignite-UX for system recovery were covered.
The author also included the most often used manual pages right in the book. If you see a command used in a chapter there is a good chance the manual page for that command appears at the end of the chapter.
This is the most complete guide for a specific UNIX variant I have seen.
Neol
I deal with UNIX daily, from AIX to HPUX to IRIX. Each UNIX flavor is different, and having a book specifically focused on your UNIX platform is helpful. Using O'Reilly's UNIX In A Nutshell is good, but you'll get more out of this book.
Rocky Basilisk
I have a problem buying the same book over and over again. Marty re-uses the material from his earlier books without adding anything new or altering the material.
And why should I pay for a book that is 20% man pages that are freely available to anyone who works on HP-UX.
Tell Marty to stop writing the same book over and over again. Instead, he could concentrate on something far more interesting to his audience..like ServiceGuard and IT/Operations...stuff that people who work in the field would like to know more about. But then he'd have to actually spend time writing and researching...rather than reformating his old material.
I'm sure there are many HP-UX horror stories out there...clients who don't know how to setup or administrate their million dollar systems....why dones't he write about that.....for a change.