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by Bill Wasik
Download And Then There's This: How Stories Live and Die in Viral Culture fb2
Networking & Cloud Computing
  • Author:
    Bill Wasik
  • ISBN:
    0670020842
  • ISBN13:
    978-0670020843
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Viking Adult; 1St Edition edition (June 11, 2009)
  • Pages:
    208 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Networking & Cloud Computing
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1406 kb
  • ePUB format
    1160 kb
  • DJVU format
    1749 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    877
  • Formats:
    lrf lrf mobi lrf


view Kindle eBook view Audible audiobook. What if the revolution was what Bill Wasik calls a 'nanostory'? It would begin with a flash mob disrupting business as usual and then die the following day, at a Ford Motor Company 'flash concert' echoing through Boston's New Brutalist downtown. And Then There's This is deeply troubling, but it's also the wittiest book I've read in years-an ingenious and, in the end, hopeful response to the sound and the fury of our twittering times.

And Then There's This book. So despite this campaign being my personal touchstone as I navigated Bill Wasik’s explication of viral in the Internet age, it’s necessarily absent from these pages. Instead, Wasik discusses his own participation in the subculture of viral content creation, starting with flash mobs and progressing to the 2008 Democratic primary and presidential election. There is something paradoxical about a dead-tree book exploring a primarily online phenomenon-but it’s not the obvious paradox.

My crowd (The Mob Project) - Annuals (Stop Peter Bjorn and John ) - I have a meme (The right-wing New York Times) - Agent Zero (Bill Shiller) - Nanopolitics (Oppodepot. And Then There's This is Bill Wasik's journey along the unexplored frontier of the twenty-first century's rambunctious new-media culture. He covers this world in part as a journalist, following "buzz bands" as they rise and fall in the online music scene, visiting with viral marketers and political trendsetters and online provocateurs.

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There's a certain irony here. Bill Wasik has written a book about creating massive publicity for non-events. Wasik's book is a collection of stories about the way he created online buzz. Wasik was supposed to cover the event as a reporter but ended up entering and winning.

Wasik is the author of And Then There's This: How Stories Live and Die in Viral Culture (Viking, 2009) and, with .

Wasik is the author of And Then There's This: How Stories Live and Die in Viral Culture (Viking, 2009) and, with Monica Murphy, Rabid (Viking), which was shortlisted for the 2013 PEN/E. O. Wilson Literary Science Writing Award. He said the mobs started as a kind of playful social experiment meant to encourage spontaneity and big gatherings to temporarily take over commercial and public areas simply to show that they could. It’s terrible that these Philly mobs have turned violent, he said.

Stories spread widely and die out in mere days, quickly replaced by more stories with shorter shelf-lives. No longer do we sit on the sidelines of this action: anyone with a computer can spread a story as easily as the New York Times(or easier).

And Then There’s This: How Stories Live and Die in Viral Culture. Frontispiece of a book about a plague in Venice, 1657. A cultural history of the. World’s most diabolical virus. Bill wasik and. Monica murphy.

And Then There’s This. How Stories Live and Die in Viral Culture. Journalist and new media provocateur Bill Wasik journeys to the edge of our churning and rambunctious viral culture to illuminate how anyone with a computer can initiate a small ripple of a story that can turn into a tsunami. While exploring this fascinating landscape, Wasik (who organized the very first flash mob in 2003) conducts six experiments himself. This book is a must-read for anyone interested in journalism, business, technology, and how cultural information spreads.

Breaking news, fresh gossip, tiny scandals, trumped-up crises-every day we are distracted by a culture that rings our doorbell and runs away. Stories spread wildly and die out in mere days, to be replaced by still more stories with ever shorter life spans. Through the Internet the news cycle has been set spinning even faster now that all of us can join the fray: anyone on a computer can spread a story almost as easily as The New York Times, CNN, or People. As media amateurs grow their audience, they learn to think like the pros, using the abundant data that the Internet offers-hit counters, most e-mailed lists, YouTube views, download tallies-to hone their own experiments in viral blowup. And Then There's This is Bill Wasik's journey along the unexplored frontier of the twenty-first century's rambunctious new-media culture. He covers this world in part as a journalist, following "buzz bands" as they rise and fall in the online music scene, visiting with viral marketers and political trendsetters and online provocateurs. But he also wades in as a participant, conducting his own hilarious experiments: an e-mail fad (which turned into the worldwide "flash mob" sensation), a viral website in a month-long competition, a fake blog that attempts to create "antibuzz," and more. He doesn't always get the results he expected, but he tries to make sense of his data by surveying what real social science experiments have taught us about the effects of distraction, stimulation, and crowd behavior on the human mind. Part report, part memoir, part manifesto, part deconstruction of a decade, And Then There's This captures better than any other book the way technology is changing our culture.

Delari
Continuing with the social media overload theme in the news of late, Wasik's book examines the ever-shortening life span of stories in our culture - whether it's news, gossip, or the latest best-seller - among the onslaught of email, RSS feeds, blog posts, and Tweets. He describes a world in which we have become so accustomed to a constant stream of new information, and so wary of always-encroaching boredom, that we tell stories about our society and ourselves, even when there is nothing new to say.

Besides the information glut, shortening attention spans, and overall exhaustion this creates, the really good content gets lost after its fleeting 15 minutes of fame (if that). And despite the broader array of news and opinion available to us, we have not necessarily broadened our horizons, but rather self-segregate ourselves into smaller & smaller niches of like-minded individuals.

The same themes were picked up in a Financial Times article last week, which noted that for many, social media has become "a more personal filter to the infinite world of the Internet." Where people use to turn to traditional portals like Yahoo! or AOL as their entry point, they are now turning to Facebook or their preferred feed aggregator, reading just the news & information that comes in from friends or other trusted sources. Ray Valdes, a media analyst from Gartner is quoted: "We are moving toward a world of `snackable' news'that'can be shared like pieces of candy or a pack of gum...Unfortunately, we run the risk of losing substance and nutritive value."

Wasik closes his book with a brief look at some of the "solutions" to Internet fatigue. Among them:

* Writer & editor Jake Silverstein's proposed Internet Ramadan, where people go offline for a month
* NYTimes writer Mark Bittman's Secular Sabbath, an experiment in going offline for a mere 24 hours
* Chip maker Intel's Quiet Time, where employees are encouraged to go offline each Tuesday morning in order to think (and work) more deeply

Should we be concerned? Or is our fast-paced lifestyle just the new norm, and the attention-getting books & headlines just another example of the trumped-up crises we crave?
Tisicai
This is a weird book that is difficult to categorize. Not many of tried to do much thinking on how a new generation (the public) generates and consume media narratives and this is the first book to do a good job advancing the science. It is also one of the few books on the internet that I thought was both forward-thinking and intellectually honest. I'd like to think I am in front of this field a bit and seen some things that only a small group has thus far. Trust me, it's not all sunshine and kittens and I don't think many people have bothered to consider the consequences of what Jeff Jarvis calls "process journalism."

There is a blurb on the back that says the book has a timeless quality to it and whoever said it is totally right. It could be The Image for my generation. The notion of process journalism, which I think is a stupid rationalization for lazy reporting - a way for blogs to abdicate responsibility for their actions - the way that we consume the stories we created ourselves like some oblivious ouroboros; all these things are discussed thoughtfully by someone with actual experience in the matter. In fact, I think it's the first time someone who knew what they were talking about has attempted to do so. It's short, definitely worth reading. A peerless book thus far.

Bill Wasik digs himself well out of the whole he created by starting flash mobs a few years ago. He should be rewarded for this thoughtful, unique and important book.
Uanabimo
Terrible book and completely worthless as a textbook companion! The author spends most of his time pontificating and showing off his detailed grasp on the lesser used and understood words in the English language! Pompous blowhard who essentially beats his own chest while giving very little instructionally on the finer points of viral communications techniques.