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by Stephen J. Miller
Download Civilizing Cyberspace: Policy, Power, and the Information Superhighway fb2
Networking & Cloud Computing
  • Author:
    Stephen J. Miller
  • ISBN:
    0201847604
  • ISBN13:
    978-0201847604
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Addison-Wesley Professional; 1 edition (November 27, 1995)
  • Pages:
    432 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Networking & Cloud Computing
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1183 kb
  • ePUB format
    1845 kb
  • DJVU format
    1460 kb
  • Rating:
    4.1
  • Votes:
    130
  • Formats:
    doc azw lrf docx


Although I strongly believe in the power of individual initiative and the importance of personal responsibility, I see all of us as social creatures.

In Civilizing Cyberspace Steven Miller presents a sweeping view of the many important issues facing society as a result of cybertechnology. But while he writes about technological and philosophical concerns, his writing is free of jargon, making his presentation easily comprehensible to those new to cyberspace. Although I strongly believe in the power of individual initiative and the importance of personal responsibility, I see all of us as social creatures. We can learn much about ourselves and our condition through isolated self-reflection, but we reach our human potential only through interaction with others.

Civilizing Cyberspace book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

Civilizing Cyberspace book. Steve Miller has written a readable, thought-provoking guide to the. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Civilizing Cyberspace: Policy, Power, and the Information Superhighway as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

The Information Superhighway explained! This is the book that lets the rest of us finally understand what it is, what impact it. .

The Information Superhighway explained! This is the book that lets the rest of us finally understand what it is, what impact it will have, and what we can do to shape our own future. Readable, comprehensive, and insightful, Civilizing Cyberspace is for nontechnical people as well as computer professionals, concerned citizens as well as official policymakers. Civilizing Cyberspace explains: how universal service can be achieved while avoiding the creation of information "haves and have nots".

Civilizing Cyberspace is the best single volume introduction to the policy issues surrounding the Internet I have seen

Civilizing Cyberspace is the best single volume introduction to the policy issues surrounding the Internet I have seen. Miller says he wrote it for information technology professionals and non-technical people "piqued by all the talk about the Information Superhighway", but I think the most important audience for his work consists of the politicians and lobbyists actually involved in formulating policy. He starts by looking at how past technologies-from the railroads to cable TV-have transformed daily life and then examines computer technology in that light.

Civilizing Cyberspace : Policy, Power, and the Information Superhighway. Steven Miller writes a sort of "choose your own adventure" book about information technology complete with alternative endings based on how well society deals with the issues and decisions encountered along the information superhighway. If you choose to use the National Information Infrastructure (NII) to benefit the market economy, turn to page19, if you choose to use the NII to promote a true democracy, turn to page 377, etc. Miller is, of course, not neutral in his opinion of what the focus of NII development ought to be.

Civilizing cyberspace. Civilizing cyberspace. policy, power, and the information superhighway. Civilizing cyberspace Close. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove Civilizing cyberspace from your list? Civilizing cyberspace.

Названия Авторы Contributors Тематика Дата публикации Сообщества и коллекции.

Miller, Steven E. Civilizing Cyberspace: Policy, Power and the Information Superhighway. Sardar, Ziauddin and Jerome R. Ravetz, ed. Cyberfutures: Culture and Politics on the Information Superhighway. New York: ACM Press ; Reading, Mass. Addison-Wesley, 1996. New York University Press, 1996. Schellenberg, Kathryn, ed.

The Information Superhighway explained! This is the book that lets the rest of us finally understand what it is, what impact it will have, and what we can do to shape our own future. What is behind the headline-grabbing mega-mergers of media companies besides speculative grabbing after windfall profits? Will deregulation and competition lead to widespread service, lower costs, and consumer satisfaction or information redlining, higher prices, and teleconglomerate monopoly? Who will benefit and who will be hurt if the United States uses high technology for competitive advantage in the global market? Is the internet a hot bed of pornography and crime, or a tool for learning and democratic power?Miller weaves together business trends, political economy, American history, technological savvy, and an awareness of our everyday needs, to focus on the issues that really matter and to make the choices clear. Readable, comprehensive, and insightful, Civilizing Cyberspace is for nontechnical people as well as computer professionals, concerned citizens as well as official policymakers.

Coiril
Steven Miller writes a sort of "choose your own adventure" book about information technology complete with alternative endings based on how well society deals with the issues and decisions encountered along the information superhighway. If you choose to use the National Information Infrastructure (NII) to benefit the market economy, turn to page19, if you choose to use the NII to promote a true democracy, turn to page 377, etc. Miller is, of course, not neutral in his opinion of what the focus of NII development ought to be.
"With information technologies, we can either move forward by "repaving the cowpaths," and simply develop quicker, more intensive ways of continuing current social realities; or we can use it to branch off in radically different directions that allow us to realize some of our most cherished values." Steven Miller (397)
These "cherished values" include a revitalized democracy and an active citizenship fueled by an informed, involved, connected, and strong community. Lest you mistake this upbeat optimism for the Pollyanna (the market will balance all in its infinite wisdom) approach touted by many cyber-enthusiasts, Miller acknowledges the need for some government regulation and makes a pretty good case for the notion that "deregulation" is not possible. The choice is either explicit regulation with citizen input, or complex, covert regulation based on grants, subsidies, and tax breaks brokered through corporate -government alliances that actually discourage citizen participation (pp. 74-79).
Miller then illustrates the joys and pitfalls of government regulation of infrastructure through a brief history of past models, e.g. trains, telephones, highways, and cable. He describes a variety of government agencies, private industry, and non-profit organizations trying to shape the NII, and manages to provide enough detail to frame the debate without forcing you to reach for the No-Doze. We are offered interesting proposals for "universal service," "electronic democracy," and an "Internet community," and, at the same time, asked to examine less attractive subjects such as invasion of privacy, intellectual property issues, and the underbelly of the NII policy making process. Okay, so its not quite the cliff-hanger you might have expected from my opening line, but it is a well written, thought-provoking book that offers a straight forward account of NII issues. And Steven Miller pulls it off while keeping the jargon to a minimum (bless his heart).
Lailace
Lot's of food for thought.
Addresses the right issues