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Download In Our Image (Theology and the Sciences) (Theology & the Sciences) fb2

by Noreen Herzfeld
Download In Our Image (Theology and the Sciences) (Theology & the Sciences) fb2
Computer Science
  • Author:
    Noreen Herzfeld
  • ISBN:
    0800634764
  • ISBN13:
    978-0800634766
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Augsburg Books (September 5, 2000)
  • Pages:
    148 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Computer Science
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1129 kb
  • ePUB format
    1520 kb
  • DJVU format
    1699 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    381
  • Formats:
    lrf rtf docx mbr


In Our Image (Theology a. .has been added to your Cart

In Our Image (Theology a.has been added to your Cart. Professor Herzfeld from St. John's University looks at the image of God through Niebuhr, Von Rad and Barth as reason, regency or function or purpose, and the ability to have a relationship with God. Then she looks at intelligent machines in the same three categories. Chapter 5 provides a Christian critique of three transhumanists assumptions. AI advocates believe in a form of immortality, cybernetic immortality-we can achieve eternity by transferring the contents of our brains to a succession of intellectual machines.

From physics and cosmology to evolutionary biology, genetics, neuroscience and the environmental sciences, Theology and Science engages scientific discourse in dialogue with both Christian and multi-religious perspectives.

Okay, so technically it's shelved under theology and science, but it's an easy crossover.

Herzfeld's exciting work further develops a relational model, in which she finds a needed corrective to the individualistic and narcissistic tendencies of much recent spirituality and the seeds of a human/computer ethic for the future. Okay, so technically it's shelved under theology and science, but it's an easy crossover. I don't necessarily agree with everything she said deity-wise, but I still liked her conclusions of losing ourselves to AI before we even know who the heck we are.

Our growing explorations of the cognitive sciences pose significant challenges to and opportunities for theological reflection

Our growing explorations of the cognitive sciences pose significant challenges to and opportunities for theological reflection. Gregory Peterson introduces these sciences: neuroscience, artificial intelligence, animal cognition, linguistics, and psychology-that specifically contribute to the new picture and their philosophical underpinnings. He shows its implications for rethinking longstanding Western assumptions about the unity of the self, the nature of consciousness, free will, inherited sin, and religious experience

Peterson views cognitive science as a resource for a new understanding of theology .

Peterson views cognitive science as a resource for a new understanding of theology. This book surveys the cognitive e, evolutionary psychology, artificial intelligence, and primate studies-and it offers incisive theological and philosophical interpretations of these sciences. It focuses on the ways that the cognitive sciences impact theological issues like original sin, consciousness, the soul, the distinctiveness of humans, culture, views of God, and God's relationship to the world.

Read in our apps: iOS. · Android. The popular stereotype is that Science, both in the Copernican revolution that dethroned the earth-centered view of the cosmos and in subsequent developments in evolutionary theory and general relativity, has marginalized and trivialized human existence, revealing humanity's place in the cosmos to be accidental, peripheral, and ultimately meaningless. However, an investigation into both modern Christian theology and contemporary twenty-first century Science reveals just the opposite, providing solid evidence in the interdisciplinary dialogue concerning the significance of humanity within.

A Scientific Theology is a set of three books by Alister McGrath that explores the parallels between the working assumptions and methods of Christian theology and those of the natural sciences. Scientific Theology is also the "running title" of the project which gave rise to the trilogy

Thus, theology is not scientific Ockham and Gregory did not intend their views to undermine theology.

Thus, theology is not scientific. The role of theology is to explain the meaning of the Bible and the articles of faith and to deduce conclusions from them. Since the credibility of the Bible rests upon belief in divine revelation, theology lacks a rational foundation. Ockham and Gregory did not intend their views to undermine theology. To the contrary, for them theology is in a sense more certain than science, because it is built upon principles that are guaranteed to be true by God, whereas the principles of science must be as fallible as their human creators.

The relationship between the sciences and theology is a fundamental obstacle for many inquisitive . Indeed, Christianity is undergoing an intellectual crisis; philosophical and theological illiteracy is pervasive in our culture.

The relationship between the sciences and theology is a fundamental obstacle for many inquisitive minds (at least on the surface). On the other hand, it has also distressed me to witness the lackadaisical approach of many believers when it comes to the articulation and understanding of arguments and reasons that support the Christian faith.

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krot
This book will likely be an early classic in the field of theology and artificial intelligence. Professor Herzfeld from St. John's University looks at the image of God through Niebuhr, Von Rad and Barth as reason, regency or function or purpose, and the ability to have a relationship with God. Then she looks at intelligent machines in the same three categories. Chapter 5 provides a Christian critique of three transhumanists assumptions. AI advocates believe in a form of immortality, cybernetic immortality--we can achieve eternity by transferring the contents of our brains to a succession of intellectual machines. Second, she looks at AI advocates' belief that humans can expand their domain, their regency, in space, mining and elsewhere without the failures humans experience, If we look to intelligent robots to overcome our failures, we will have created a "stand-in for God" and make them idols. If we see reason as merely instrumental, then instead of people seeing themselves as caretakers of creation and thus children of God, we will see the work of the world done through computers, we will break our relationship with God, and then tend to see creation as our own creation. The last chapter explores a human-computer ethic. Just as we are imperfect images of God, so intelligent robots are imperfect images of humans. Just as we ignore, oppose or fight each other, we move closer to the machine. If machines can become intelligent, perhaps God, who has a relationship with us as a free gift might bestow that gift of relationship with thinking machines, though "we cannot know the nature of nor share that relationship." 92 I have not done justice to the quality of her thought but I believe her framework and where it leads her in the last chapter is a great introduction to the questions of theology and artificial intelligence.
Thabel
Great
Samugor
Advances in artificial intelligence pose more and more questions to our self-understanding. Herzfeld reflects in this book on some of the theological implications of artificial intelligence for the question what it means to be created in the image of God. She does so, not only by analyzing the human desire for artificial inteliience, but also by analyzing some theological approaches to the image of God (notably those by Reinhold Niebuhr, Von Rad and Karl Barth).

The book is theologically as well as scientifically quite strong. Herzfeld knows her theology as well as her computer science.

For me it was a sensation to read such a refreshing book, as it really forced me to reflect on my own ideas about the interaction of nature, theology, and technology. If you are interested in these matters, read this book. At the moment there is no book like this one on such an interesting and important topic.