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by Abaitua Matthew De
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Hiking & Camping
  • Author:
    Abaitua Matthew De
  • ISBN:
    0241145139
  • ISBN13:
    978-0241145135
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Hamish Hamilton UK; 1 edition (August 23, 2011)
  • Pages:
    240 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Hiking & Camping
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1707 kb
  • ePUB format
    1858 kb
  • DJVU format
    1572 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
  • Votes:
    375
  • Formats:
    docx lit mobi azw


Matthew de Abaitua has written an idiosyncratic take on modern camping, specifically looking at the UK, US and Germany.

Matthew de Abaitua has written an idiosyncratic take on modern camping, specifically looking at the UK, US and Germany. The subtitle promises a history, but apart from the obligatory nod to stone age man in the opening chapter and the occasional mention of ancient military camps, this book only reaches back to the early nineteenth century, and then with a very selective touch. It is mainly about organised camping, that new form of recreation that began to appear two centuries ago and which has arisen alongside increases in wealth. In the pre-modern world, in many poor countries today, and for.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for The Art of Camping The History and . Получить до Пт, 24 янв - Ср, 19 фев от NY, США.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for The Art of Camping The History and Practice., Состояние: Очень хорошее состояние. 30-дневный возврат товаров - Покупатель оплачивает обратную доставку товара. Books will be free of page markings. Показать все 2 объявления с подержанными товарами.

The Art of Camping book. As with many great books that are ostensibly about one thing (camping in this instance), in many ways it is also about everything.

Matthew De Abaitua - The Art of Camping. It’s a fine writer indeed who can seem authoritative, approachable and just great fu. Metro ‘A gem of a book. Does for camping what Roger Deakin did for wild swimming.

com, provide amusing and useful information on where and how to camp in Britain

com, provide amusing and useful information on where and how to camp in Britain. He is also the compere of the Free University of Glastonbury and the author of the novel The Red Men, which was shortlisted for the Arthur C. Clarke Award and is currently being made into a film by Shynola. Matthew lives with his wife Cath and young family in Sussex.

Matthew De Abaitua (born 1971) is a British writer  . He is a lecturer in Creative Writing at the University of Essex. This section is empty. The Idler's Companion: An anthology of Lazy Literature, 4th Estate, 1996. "Matthew De Abaitua". Flood, Alison (21 May 2015). Will Self's 'amanuensis' to publish memoir of working for the novelist".

by Matthew De Abaitua. Select Format: Paperback. ISBN13:9780241953877. Country of Publication. CAMPING means different things to different people

By Matthew De Abaitua. Hamish Hamilton; 294 pages; £1. 9. CAMPING means different things to different people. For nomads, such as the Qashqai, Bedouin or Sioux, it is a way of life. For soldiers it is a solution to living in the field. For recreational campers it is about freedom, self-sufficiency and a re-engagement with the outdoors- a way of compensating for the enervations of urban life.

Could there be another way of life? Can I survive with less stuff? Should I run for the hills? These are all good questions that people have asked before, throughout history, and which have inspired people to set up camp. But now camping is part of the drive for self-sufficiency, a reaction against mass tourism, a chance to connect with the land, to experience a community, to leave no trace . . . From packing to pitching, with hikes into the deep history of the subject and encounters with the great campers and camping movements of the past, this is a witty and philosophical blend of 'how to', history and personal anecdotes - a must for every camper.

Virn
Matthew de Abaitua has written an idiosyncratic take on modern camping, specifically looking at the UK, US and Germany. The subtitle promises a history, but apart from the obligatory nod to stone age man in the opening chapter and the occasional mention of ancient military camps, this book only reaches back to the early nineteenth century, and then with a very selective touch. It is mainly about organised camping, that new form of recreation that began to appear two centuries ago and which has arisen alongside increases in wealth.

In the pre-modern world, in many poor countries today, and for the poor in rich countries, camping is still part of a life cycle rather than a recreation. Shepherds, cattle herders, and those transporting livestock or goods over long distances all camped out as part of their work. Where I live, farmers camp out in shelters to watch over ripening crops and workers camp out at mining sites, gravel dredging spots on rivers, building sites in towns and cities, rubbish dumps and recycling grounds - for a myriad of jobs that keep the economic wheels spinning. In the not too distant past in Britain and the rest of Europe, families from the cities camped on farms to work during crop picking seasons - and on the hop farms of Kent even took their stilts. For those expelled from the rat race, camping out on the streets is often the only option. None of this gets a look-in as far as The Art of Camping goes. Instead, we see the rise of modern camping as an escape from city life and a way of regenerating the spirit and improving ourselves before returning to our shackles as wage slaves.

De Abaitua looks at the differing interpretations of modern camping. For many it was a way of toughening up modern men and boys (and later women and girls) in order to counter the degenerative effects of civilisation. In this regard it was intimately tied to fears about the end of empire. Such a view usually took a militaristic bent, evident in large organisations like the Hitler Youth and the Scouts, with their uniforms, ranks and imposed discipline. Many smaller groups copied this approach. A common concern was avoiding idle time - a euphemism for the busy time of sin and pleasure - so worthy activities became an unavoidable part of camp routine.

There were also groups which sought an alternative to modern capitalism through camping and communal ways of being in the outdoors. The book looks at a number of groups which took socialism in various guises as their leading principle, as well as fringe groups of mystics and naturists. There is a clear lineage to the hippie movement of the 1960s. During the Great Depression, socialist groups offered camping and work to unemployed men in order to restore their confidence, and similar groups have since offered opportunities to young criminal offenders to give them a vision of other ways to be. The latter has also been a marketing opportunity for the more militaristic groups, as modern boot camps show (de Abaitua avoids discussing these).

So it's a potted history rather than a rigorous study that we get in this book, but an enjoyable one nonetheless and one which is replete with satisfying anecdotes. (There is a useful bibliography for anyone wanting to delve more deeply into the history.) The chapters are arranged according to the camping cycle, from packing and pitching to eventually striking camp and going home, and de Abaitua includes stories of his own camping experiences: from boyhood through his lager lout years to responsible fatherhood. He provides some insights into why he enjoys camping and his musings show a mix of the militaristic and mystic strands he describes in the book, though a greater degree of self-reflection would have enriched what he has to say.

In the first chapter he details the ordeal of getting him, his wife and baby daughter through London's public transport system in order to fly to Ireland for a camping trip. It's meant to be amusing, but what struck me most was the weight of possessions they felt obliged to carry with them. Camping has become a rich vein for consumerism. Like many other aspects of modern life, it is an excuse for buying endless things - pieces of equipment, utensils and gadgets, fancy tents and bedding, designer clothing, boots and shoes (and then the cream to treat the blisters they cause). De Abaitua's wife Cath writes an appendix to the book that provides an essential packing list for going camping and no doubt many will find it helpful, but I was exhausted by the end of it.

Behind my house, in a small south-east Asian city, there is an empty patch of ground where an extended family of several adults and children has been camping out for over six months in order to recycle plastic and glass waste. They work, sleep, bathe, launder, cook, eat and drink there, though mercifully go to the toilet in an nearby building. I think that all their possessions would fit into one or two shopping bags. In this they are no different from the millions of other poor itinerant workers in many parts of Asia or the wider world. Their simplicity, doggedness and good humour are both humbling and instructive. I didn't see anyone like them in this book.

De Abaitua believes that camping allows us to escape the pressures of modern capitalism, or in Thoreau's words, our lives of `quiet desperation'. It gives us time to contemplate, to be with others on an equal footing, and to restore our confidence by making us more self-reliant. These are the things that make camping worthwhile, but as the author describes in the wake of the Glastonbury music festival, much of modern camping is also about mass consumption, mountains of trash and alienation from both other people and our environment. It seems that the cancerous, soul-destroying nature of capitalism has infected camping just like everything else. To his credit, de Abaitua has a vision of a different way forward. It's a bit blurred and self-contradictory, but at least he's making the effort.
Diab
I really wanted to like this book, and ordered it from UK just to get it earlier than it was avail in the USA. It is a flop. The book is about early 20th century fringe groups who go back to nature with off track ideas, notions, etc. This book has very little to do with camping, but rather it is supposed to be a history of the camping movement. Unfort., the author only focuses on fringe groups. The most telling flaw of this politically motivated book is that the author all but ignores the Boy Scouts. How can you write a book on the outdoors movements in the USA and UK and NOT include the Scouts? It would be like wrting a history of the Super Bowl and leaving out the Steelers, or a history of the U.S. Presidency and excluding Lincoln. Readers will clearly see that the author choses to ignore the BSA (and slams Lord Baden Powell every chance he gets) because the Boy Scouts refuse to allow homosexuals to be scout leaders, and thus he waves them off as unworthy of this study. The editors should also be faulted for such a flawed book getting to press. The book isn't just flawed---it is plain foolish.