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Field Guides
  • ISBN:
    1419340832
  • ISBN13:
    978-1419340833
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  • Publisher:
    Recorded Books
  • Subcategory:
    Field Guides
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  • FB2 format
    1837 kb
  • ePUB format
    1478 kb
  • DJVU format
    1861 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    973
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    azw lit txt mobi


Richard Koeppel’s obsession began at age twelve, in Queens, New York, when he first spotted a Brown Thrasher . As a glimpse into human behavior and family relationships, To See Every Bird on Earth is a rarity: a book about birding that nonbirders will find just as rewarding.

Richard Koeppel’s obsession began at age twelve, in Queens, New York, when he first spotted a Brown Thrasher, and jotted the sighting in a notebook. Several decades, one failed marriage, and two sons later, he set out to see every bird on earth, becoming a member of a subculture of competitive bird watchers worldwide all pursuing the same goal.

It became the first bird on his 'life list' But most of all, it's the story of a father and son and of how the very thing that pushed them apart also provide the route towards reconciliation.

It became the first bird on his 'life list'. Several decades later, he added an astonishing 517 birds to that list on a single trip to Kenya. And that was when the list really took over. He ended the last romantic relationship he would ever have, scaled down his medical practice, and decided to see every bird on earth. In doing so he became a member of a sub-culture of competitive bird-watchers all pursuing the same goal. But most of all, it's the story of a father and son and of how the very thing that pushed them apart also provide the route towards reconciliation.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read Through writing the book, Koeppel comes to understand his father in a way that he couldn’t have without interviewing his father’s friends and colleagues – the other birders that he me. .

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking To See Every Bird on Earth: A Father, a Son, and a Lifelong Obsession as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Through writing the book, Koeppel comes to understand his father in a way that he couldn’t have without interviewing his father’s friends and colleagues – the other birders that he met during those intense trips to exotic places on the hunt for birds (not that these hunts resulted in any deaths – to the birds at least.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 273-275). A nature writer describes his father's ambitious pursuits in the world of competitive birding, recounting his efforts to spot more than seven thousand species at the expense of his personal relationships and the author's own coming-to-terms with his father's vocation.

I should have paid more attention to the subtitle of Koeppel's book: A Father, A Son and a Lifelong Obsession. He would go birding with his father and this became fun for him. But he didn't get to see his dad often enough.

Richard Koeppel’s obsession began at age twelve, in Queens, New York, when he first spotted a Brown Thrasher .

As a glimpse into human behavior and family relationships, To See Every Bird on Earth is a rarity: a book about . I should have paid more attention to the subtitle of Koeppel's book: A Father, A Son and a Lifelong Obsession.

As a glimpse into human behavior and family relationships, To See Every Bird on Earth is a rarity: a book about birding that nonbirders will find just as rewarding. While To See Every Bird on Earth has some interesting inside stuff about the world of Big Listers (bird counters with thousands of birds on their list), it's really not about birding at all but about Koeppel's need for love and attention from his father, a physician and smoker who loves counting (not just birds but license.

What drives a man to travel to sixty countries and spend a fortune to count birds? And what if that man is your father? Richard Koeppel s obsession began at age twelve, in Queens, New York, when he first spotted a Brown Thrasher, and jotted the sighting in a notebook.

To See Every Bird on Earth: A Father, a Son, and a Lifetime Obsession is a book by Dan Koeppel first published in 2005. It is about the author's relationship with his father Richard Koeppel, an obsessive "Big Lister" birdwatcher who had spotted over 7000 different species of birds at the time the book was written. The book focuses on Dan Koeppel's attempts to understand the obsession that ruled his father's life.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for To See Every Bird on Earth: A Father . Minimal damage to the book cover eg. scuff marks, but no holes or tears. If this is a hard cover, the dust jacket may be missing. Binding has minimal wear.

Minimal damage to the book cover eg. The majority of pages are undamaged with some creasing or tearing, and pencil underlining of text, but this is minimal. No highlighting of text, no writing in the margins, and no missing pages.

Book by Dan Koeppel

Cerar
I recent read Dan Koeppel's book on the banana, liked it and bought this thinking Koeppel would do the same thing with birding that he did with bananas. I should have paid more attention to the subtitle of Koeppel's book: A Father, A Son and a Lifelong Obsession.

While To See Every Bird on Earth has some interesting inside stuff about the world of Big Listers (bird counters with thousands of birds on their list), it's really not about birding at all but about Koeppel's need for love and attention from his father, a physician and obsessive-compulsive smoker who loves counting (not just birds but license plates, cheese, beer and books) more than medicine and, if you can believe the book, more than his wife or sons.

Koeppel writes that he grew up in a mostly dysfunctional family, where grandparents push their only surviving son to become a doctor, mother and father do dope, and after mom and pop split, mom brings home a long series boyfriends the way some people would bring home stray mutts.

Even if you take what Koeppel says at face value and don't read between the lines, this book is one big long plea for love and attention from his father. It's Koeppel's all-too-public effort to understand why his dad is obsessed with reaching 7,000 birds or more.

And it's one of the saddest books I've read in a long time.
Shaktizragore
If someone wants to understand birding in America, this is the book to read. The Big Year: A Tale of Man, Nature, and Fowl Obsession by Mark Obmascik would be my second choice. Koeppel's book is better, however, because it focuses on one person as opposed to a group of competitive birders. As a result, the author does a much better job of probing the inner-workings of the obsessed birder than Obmascik, who never quite gets beneath the feathers of most of the birders he examines. Koeppel, by contrast, tells us everything about the big lister profiled in the book--his eye ring, distinctive wing bars, rufous belly, etc. At times, the book is almost too personal and too intimate, making it painful to read in points. I sometimes wished that the author examined his father with a pair of Swarovski EL 10x42s as opposed to a high-powered microscope, but a son in the end can only see his father through the lens of his own personal experience. What results is not always pretty but nevertheless an excellent portrait of a great American birder.
Lightseeker
Dan Koeppel very much wanted to get to know his father. His mom and dad were divorced when he was young and it was not an easy time. He saw his dad every other weekend but he seemed removed and withdrawn, and Dan never felt he really knew his dad. Dan had a usual childhood, and his adolescence was full of drugs and alcohol. As a young adult Dan outgrew his wild ways and settled down to become a nature writer. This brought him to the point where he realized his dad was getting older and he wanted a better relationship. And, Dan had a pretty good idea of how to achieve this.

Richard Koeppel had grown up wanting to be an ornithologist. He had a particular love of birds and wanted to study them. However, his parents and his father in particular had a different vision of his son. So, Richard began his life studying to become a physician. He continued with his life long love of birds and went birding whenever he could. Eventually, Richard met the love of his life and married her. She was a hometown girl and was beautiful and was swept away by this man. Richard continued his studies and graduated as a physician. He now had responsibilities because his first born son was born. He didn't like the life of a physician, and he had various jobs that at leas paid him a decent salary. By this time there were two young boys and his marriage was going sour. He and his wife divorced and he never married again. He saw his boys on weekends.

Dan saw both sides of the marriage and was unsettled. He lived with his mother, and her boyfriends were sometimes nasty and abusive. She would also take out her frustrations on her sons. Life was not good. He would go birding with his father and this became fun for him. But he didn't get to see his dad often enough.

By the time Dan was ready to get to know his father better, Richard was on his way to identifying his 6,000 bird. The birding world is a different species. There were many people who love birds and there were 9,600 birds to identify in the entire world. People spent millions of dollars traveling to various parts of the world just to find that bird. This is when Dan started going on birding trips with his dad. His dad was now an ED physician which gave him plenty of time to pursue his love. He had been all over the world and was so pleased that Dan wanted to continue with him. He had a few more birds to identify and he wanted to make it to 7,000 birds. Thus began the quest for Dan and his father, Richard, to find the birds.

I love birds, love their coloring , their calls and their existence. However I have never been that much interested in identifying birds. This book opened up the world of birding, and these are crazy people in a sense. They will do anything; go anywhere to find that bird. I loved that Dan got to know his father better while they both developed their relationship birding. I learned a great deal about birds and that kind of life. Dan Koeppel writes well and his sense of nature reveals the world around us. Highly recommended. prisrob
Lavivan
Dan Koeppel is a very good story teller and he talks about his life with a father that was obsessed with seeing birds. You will not learn anything at any depth about birds, but you will learn about a father and son as they grow and get to know and understand more about each other. This authors journey to understand his father and his father's desire to see birds is a very enjoyable read. Having read many of the other books about birders in the past, I really enjoyed reading about his fathers early days and his early interest in birds. This book made me think more about my relationship with my father.
Perongafa
The father, a military man, gradually became obsessed with seeing every bird that was possible, and traveled all over the world. I wonder how much he saw of the countries he visited. His son, the author, felt ignored by his parents as he grew up. His mother seemed to be almost a hippie. They divorced, each going his own way. There are many people who try to see thousands of birds, precisely listing each one. This life would not interest me, even though I love birds. Excludes too much of a normal life, and it costs a great deal of money.