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by Bill Nowlin
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Biographies
  • Author:
    Bill Nowlin
  • ISBN:
    1579400884
  • ISBN13:
    978-1579400880
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Rounder Books (January 28, 2004)
  • Pages:
    388 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Biographies
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1411 kb
  • ePUB format
    1432 kb
  • DJVU format
    1712 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    605
  • Formats:
    docx lrf txt mbr


John Michael Pesky (born John Michael Paveskovich; February 27, 1919 – August 13, 2012), nicknamed "The Needle" and "Mr. Red Sox", was an American professional baseball player, manager and coach.

John Michael Pesky (born John Michael Paveskovich; February 27, 1919 – August 13, 2012), nicknamed "The Needle" and "Mr. He was a shortstop and third baseman during a ten-year major league playing career, appearing in 1,270 games played in 1942 and from 1946 to 1954 for three teams.

Mr. Red Sox is the first biography of Pesky ever published

Mr. Red Sox is the first biography of Pesky ever published. Mr. With a baseball career spanning 8 decades, Johnny has been clubhouse kid, major league shortstop with stats better than several Hall of Famers, coach, manager, broadcaster and a special evaluator of talent. At age 84, he is still in uniform, in the clubhouse and out on the field before every Red Sox home game. Thi Mr.

Red Sox : Johnny Pesky.

Mr. Red Sox: The Johnny Pesky Story - Bill Nowlin - Google Books. a b Johnny Pesky Statistics and History - Baseball-Reference. a b Johnny Pesky at the SABR Bio Project, by Bill Nowlin, retrieved 6 May 2013. Croatian Chronicle Network 35 Pacific Northwest Croatian Athletes. August 15, 2012Boston GlobeJohn M. Pesky obituary, ^ a b Johnny Pesky at the SABR Bio Project, by Bill Nowlin, retrieved 6 May 2013. Encyclopedia Britannica.

Bibliographic Details. Title: Mr. Red Sox: The Johnny Pesky Story. Publisher: Rounder Books. Red Sox is the first biography of Pesky ever published

Bibliographic Details. With a baseball career spanning eight decades, Johnny has been clubhouse kid, major league shortstop with stats better than several Hall of Famers, coach, manager, broadcaster and a special evaluator of talent. This book illuminates one of the most interesting lives in baseball in the twentieth century.

The Red Sox named Mr. Pesky first-base coach in 1975. He became special assistant to the general manager in 1985 and later special assignment instructor. In 1982, Mr. Pesky lost 40 pounds, his life threatened by a mysterious ailment

The Red Sox named Mr. Pesky lost 40 pounds, his life threatened by a mysterious ailment. It was finally diagnosed as a late-developing allergy to gluten. There was a media flare-up in 1997 when general manager Dan Duquette decreed that Mr. Pesky couldn’t suit up and sit in the Red Sox dugout during home games. The ensuing outcry was further proof of the special place Mr. Pesky had in the hearts of Red Sox fans.

Red Sox is the first biography of Pesky ever published.

John Michael Pesky was born on September 27, 1919. He was nicknamed "The Needle" and "Mr. Red Sox," and is a former Major League Baseball shortstop, third baseman, and manager. During a 10-year playing career, he played in 1942 and from 1946-1954 for three different teams. He missed all of the 1943, 1944, and 1945 seasons while serving in World War II. Johnny Pesky's biography is Mr. Red Sox by Bill Nowlin, published by Rounder Books

Cecilia Tan and Bill Nowlin have done a good deed for the Fenway faithful. It's a daunting task, but Cecilia Tan and Bill Nowlin have come up with the Red Sox greatest hits album, the box set. Enjoy. -Dan Shaughnessy, author of Reversing the Curse.

Cecilia Tan and Bill Nowlin have done a good deed for the Fenway faithful. Harvey Frommer, coauthor of Red Sox vs. Yankees: The Great Rivalry. Old Towne Team fans will think they have died and gone to heaven with The 50 Greatest Red Sox Games in their grasp. Informative, exciting, entertaining. Cecilia Tan and Bill Nowlin have done a good deed for the Fenway faithful. -Harvey Frommer, coauthor of Red Sox vs.

Mr. Red Sox is the first biography of Pesky ever published. With a baseball career spanning eight decades, Johnny has been clubhouse kid, major league shortstop with stats better than several Hall of Famers, coach, manager, broadcaster and a special evaluator of talent. At age 84, he is still in uniform, in the clubhouse and out on the field before every Red Sox home game. This book illuminates one of the most interesting lives in baseball in the twentieth century.

Iesha
This is a trip back to my younger days. After finding the book on Ted "Mr. Baseball" Williams at the Williams Museum at Tropicana Field I noticed a write up on Mr Pesky and his book. Having seen both of these fellas play I just couldn't resist. It brings back memories of White, Dropo, Goodman, DiMaggio, Parnell, Tebbetts, Sain, Kinder as well as others that I can not remember right off. The book is an easy read and I suggest it to anyone that is a member of Red Sox Nation. I plan to have it with me at spring training next year. Mr Pesky is at each home game and I hope to have him sign it. The new spring training ballpark will be a smaller version of Fenway Park so there should be a Pesky Pole in right field. Thank you Johnny for a trip back to when playing ball was fun.Mr. Red Sox: The Johnny Pesky Story
Majin
Early chapters get quite redundant, but author Nowlin then hits his stride once Johnny hits the majors. Overall, a pretty good look at Pesky's life & career.
Moonshaper
Loved this tribute to Johnny Pesky who was indeed Mr. Red Sox.
GoodBuyMyFriends
You don't have to be a Red Sox fan to enjoy this book. Not only is this a great history of Johnny Pesky and the Red Sox but it also gives a nice insight into what it was like to be an American male during the WWII period. The book starts with a nostalgic look at life in the Croatian immigrant neighborhood where Paveskovich family lived in Portland, Or, and follows Pesky's career as a player, a member of navy, a coach, and a manager. There are great stories told by Pesky and others, a fine historical perspective, actual accounts of games of note, and the real lowdown on "Pesky's Pole" and the infamous play that ended the 1946 World Series. And then there's the foreword written by Pesky's team mate Ted Williams calling for Hall of Fame consideration for Pesky. You still see the enthusiastic octogenerian Johnny Pesky on the field before every Red Sox game at Fenway with his fungo bat, delightful grin and his obvious love for the game of baseball and the Boston Red Sox. I recommend this book very highly to every baseball fan. Johnny Pesky truly is "Mr. Red Sox" and this is a fitting tribute to him. If you are a Red Sox fan, this book belongs on your shelf.
Nern
This book should have been a great biography of Johnny Pesky, a Nice Guy who is finally finishing first. The author took the time to interview many people, and found much material that was not widely known about Pesky's personal life.

However, he never bothered to edit the book. It is a nightmarish mish-mash of material. Many times the same story or fact is repeated in several consecutive chapters because there is no strong outline of what material is to be covered when. This jumping back and forth effect also causes confusion in understanding the sequence of events in his life. The poor editing turns this book into primary material to slog through to garner information, rather than a book one can read for enjoyment.

This book is a fly-by-night job. There are other books on Pesky now; I recommend searching them out.
Xurad
I was motivated to write because of the strange review by "L. Goldstein," who seems a little off. Goldstein says this book has "no strong outline of what material is to be covered when."

Wrong. It actually does, though not exactly the most imaginative one. Each year in Pesky's professional life is detailed, for instance, 1946 is followed by 1947 is followed by 1948, and so forth. What Goldstein is talking about isn't clear, since 1947 material is covered in the 1947 chapter and 1948 material is covered in the 1948 chapter, and so forth and so on. Goldstein doesn't provide a single example. There's obviously something else going on here.

Be that as it may, I enjoyed the book immensely. The author obviously spent a lot of time researching it and wrote a very straight-ahead book that I found easy to read. The ups and downs of this great Red Sox player are detailed well here.