» » Eight Men Out: The Black Sox and the 1919 World Series

Download Eight Men Out: The Black Sox and the 1919 World Series fb2

by Eliot Asinof
Download Eight Men Out: The Black Sox and the 1919 World Series fb2
Baseball
  • Author:
    Eliot Asinof
  • ISBN:
    0613180720
  • ISBN13:
    978-0613180726
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Turtleback Books: A Division of Sanval (May 2000)
  • Subcategory:
    Baseball
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1826 kb
  • ePUB format
    1449 kb
  • DJVU format
    1712 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    336
  • Formats:
    mbr lrf docx txt


First published in 1963, Eight Men Out has become a timeless classic.

First published in 1963, Eight Men Out has become a timeless classic. Eliot Asinof has reconstructed the entire scene-by-scene story of the fantastic scandal in which eight Chicago White Sox players arranged with the nation's leading gamblers to throw the Series in Cincinnati. The headlines proclaimed the 1919 fix of the World Series and attempted cover-up as "the most gigantic sporting swindle in the history of America!" First published in 1963, Eight Men Out has become a timeless classic.

The headlines proclaimed the 1919 fix of the World Series and attempted cover-up as "the most gigantic sporting .

The headlines proclaimed the 1919 fix of the World Series and attempted cover-up as "the most gigantic sporting swindle in the history of America!" First published in 1963, Eight Men Out has become a timeless classic. Eliot Asinof has reconstructed the entire scene-by-scene story of the fantastic scandal in which eight Chicago White Sox players arranged with the nation's leading gamblers to throw the Series in Cincinnati

Asinof, Eliot, Gould. One more game would clinch it for them, no small matter to a city with an inferiority complex over its secondary status among American metropoli.

Asinof, Eliot, Gould. than before the opener. The people of the city poured into the streets, strolling in the early autumn sunshine. Bands paraded through town en route to the ball park playing "Hail, Hail, the Gang's All Here!"

The headlines proclaimed the 1919 fix of the World Series and attempted cover-up as "the most gigantic sporting .

The headlines proclaimed the 1919 fix of the World Series and attempted cover-up as "the most gigantic sporting swindle in the history of America!" In this timeless classic, Eliot Asinof has reconstructed the entire story of the infamous scandal in which eight Chicago White Sox players arranged with the nation's leading gamblers to throw the Series to Cincinnati.

Showing 1-15 of 15. Eight Men Out: The Black Sox and the 1919 World Series (Paperback). Published May 1st 2000 by Holt Paperbacks. Paperback, 336 pages.

The world's most revered and eloquent interpreter of evolutionary ideas offers here a work of explanatory force unprecedented .

The world's most revered and eloquent interpreter of evolutionary ideas offers here a work of explanatory force unprecedented in our time-a landmark publication, both for its historical sweep and for its scientific vision. With characteristic attention to. Time's Arrow, Time's Cycle: Myth and Metaphor in the Discovery of Geological Time. by Stephen Jay Gould. In his final book and his first full-length original title since Full House in 1996, the eminent paleontologist Stephen Jay Gould offers a surprising and nuanced study of the complex relationship between our two great ways of knowing: science and the huma. The Panda's Thumb: More Reflections in Natural History.

We’re dedicated to reader privacy so we never track you. We never accept ads. But we still need to pay for servers and staff. I know we could charge money, but then we couldn’t achieve our mission: a free online library for everyone. This is our day. Today. To bring the best, most trustworthy information to every internet reader. I believe all of this.

Asinof vividly describes the tense meetings, the hitches in the conniving, the actual plays in whic.


Fek
If you love sports history, you must read this book. The film of the same name is pleasant entertainment, but not a definitive account of what happened. This book is.

The 1919 World Series scandal was as mysterious as it was destructive. Players were coerced into testimony with the promise of immunity and then indicted based on that testimony. Owners colluded. DAs cheated and lied. Statements were given and then reversed. Pages of testimony and written confessions were lost forever.

Through exhaustive research, Asinof was able to piece together from several incomplete records and sources a complete timeline and blow by blow account of the entire scandal. While the movie focuses on "innocent" players who had had enough of being cheated by their evil penny-pinching owner, the book portrays a more even and complete story. Yes, Comisky was cheap and certainly not well-liked by his players, but several of the "eight" needed very little encouraging to take what they thought would be easy money. The book shows in detail how the players (even those who wanted to do the right thing and confess) were railroaded by overzealous prosecutors and baseball owners desperate to protect their investments.

This is required reading for any Chicago sports fan. This story shows just how crooked baseball was in those early days. The 1919 World Series was only one of dozens of known "fixed" games in the early 20th century. And, a special note to Cubs fans (like me) who enjoy holding this scandal over our downtown rivals - the Cubbies threw plenty of games themselves, and there are plenty of pages devoted to it here.
Chuynopana
I have long been a fan of both baseball and had seen...more than once...the movie "Eight Men Out." Every time the film showed up on Comcast's schedule, I would watch it.

I realized that I needed to know more than what a movie shows. So I read the book. Wow, what great writing! A fascinating look at what a limited-by-time constraints movie just can't present.

If you love baseball history or are at all curious about the story of the "Black Sox" I highly recommend Asinov's book. Even if you don't "know" baseball, it's a great read about greed, the pitfalls of our legal system "back in the day," and how otherwise honest, but naive, human beings can be manipulated.
Dozilkree
The story of the 1919 Chicago "Blacksox" is a microcosm of America, in my opinion. Asinof does a Wonderful job of giving you not only the major players but their backgrounds as well. He also does an excellent job of recreating what it was like in the 1900's world of Major League Baseball. The story is told with a richness of detail, and also the devotion/heartbreak of a "fan". I bought this book because I have loved the movie for decades, and decided to check the source material. I was thoroughly rewarded with a rich toem, full of feeling and detail. The story contains Gamblers, ballplayers, and other celebrities from 1900's America. The Gambler Arnold Rothstein(Boardwalk Empire) is a fascinating figure, as are the players, owners, and newsmen who are at the heart of this story. Eight Men Out is sympathetic to the ballplayers without ever excusing them for their betrayal of trust. At the end the reader gets a great tale, but also a reminder that, it is not always the talent you have that matters, but the money!!!! btw for the people who question the authors facts, much like the Kennedy assassination, this is a part of history that is very muddled lies and double crosses abounded, so for everything he got wrong(or indulged) their are a 100 details that paint a very true scene, and ultimately it is up to the reader to decide who they blame and who they forgive!!!
Flocton
"Eight Men Out" was first published in 1963 but may still be considered the definitive account of the 1919 Black Sox scandal which is often brought up in today's media as a reference to the current black spot on baseball ("steroids is the biggest scandal since 1919..."). The Chicago White Sox's loss in the 1919 World Series caused by eight (well, one of the 8--Buck Weaver--actually played to win) players who agreed to throw the series as part of a gambling conspiracy was very complex with many names involved. The strongest part about Asinof's book is how clearly he explains the workings of the series fix. The official trial documents were lost and most of the survivors of that time who were in anyway close to the fix refused to cooperate with the author.

Asinof had to rely in large part on newspaper articles either contemporary or later accounts that revealed hitherto unknown facts about the case. Despite such limitations, Asinof clearly reveals the workings of the gambling world, the motivations of the players involved in the conspiracy, the suspicions of the newspapermen who covered the series, and the response of the higher ups like Charles Comiskey and AL President Byron Johnson in dealing with the scandal. Conjectures were made in the process, but Asinof includes relevant background information on the characters involved to give validity to his interpretations.

The planning of the conspiracy (probably the most difficult part of the story to tell) and the games themselves are the most comprehensive and intriguing parts of the book. The trial and the aftermath were also well-written and thorough covering the fates of almost every character involved. I saw a sports memorabilia catalogue that offered a letter signed by Commissioner Landis to Joe Jackson dated April 6, 1922 which stated "In view of the crime in connection with the World's Series of 1919, of course the money about which you inquire cannot be paid to you" (the minimum bid was $5,000--half of what Cicotte received for his part in the conspiracy). This book definitely gave me a better understanding of what that 1919 scandal that ruined the careers of Jackson and seven of his teammates was about. If one is really interested in this subject, I would recommend also looking at other more recently published books to see if there has been more information unearthed since "Eight Men Out."