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by Society for American Baseball Research
Download The SABR Baseball List & Record Book: Baseball's Most Fascinating Records and Unusual Statistics fb2
Baseball
  • Author:
    Society for American Baseball Research
  • ISBN:
    1416532455
  • ISBN13:
    978-1416532453
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Scribner (March 20, 2007)
  • Pages:
    496 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Baseball
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1594 kb
  • ePUB format
    1568 kb
  • DJVU format
    1496 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    456
  • Formats:
    lrf mobi mbr lit


Unlike other record books that only list the record holders - say, most RBI by a rookie, held by Ted Williams with 145 .

Established in Cooperstown, New York, on August 10, 1971 by sportswriter Bob Davids, it is based in Phoenix, Arizona. Its membership as of June 1, 2019, is 5,367.

This is a treasure trove of baseball history for statistically.

Unlike other record books that only list the record holders - say, most RBI by a rookie, held by Ted Williams with 145 - SABR details every rookie to reach 100 RBI. Other record books might note the last pitcher in each league to steal home; here SABR has included every pitcher to do it.

The SABR Baseball List and Record Book : Baseball's Most Fascinating Records and Unusual Statstics. Not the first baseball statistics book you should own, but a good supplement. com User, May 17, 2007. This book contains a lot of statistics that you can't find anywhere else. It may be easy to find out who has, say, the largest number of doubles ever, but in this book you'll find the ranking of the highest ones, going down, for some statistics, to the top 50 or the top 100.

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Listed below are the Major League Baseball teams with the worst season won-lost records, as determined by winning percentage . 00 or less), minimum 120 games played. The following teams finished the season with . 00 winning percentage or lower. NL National League. AL American League. AA American Association.

Baseball's Most Fascinating Records and Unusual Statistics. Print ISBN: 9781416532453, 1416532455. The world’s eTextbook reader for students. VitalSource is the leading provider of online textbooks and course materials. More than 15 million users have used our Bookshelf platform over the past year to improve their learning experience and outcomes.

Baseball list and record book.

From the authority on baseball research and statistics comes a vast and fascinating compendium of unique baseball lists and records.

The SABR Baseball List & Record Book is an expansive collection of pitching, hitting, fielding, home run, team, and rookie records not available online or in any other book. This is a treasure trove of baseball history for statistically minded baseball fans that's also packed with intriguing marginalia. For instance, on July 25, 1967, Chicago's Ken Berry ended Game Two of a doubleheader against Cleveland with a home run in the bottom of the sixteenth inning -- Chicago's second game-winning homer of the day. The comprehensive lists include Most Career Home Runs by Two Brothers (Tommie and Hank Aaron have 768), Most Seasons with 15 or More Wins (Cy Young and Greg Maddux each have 18), and Highest On Base Percentage in a Season by a Rookie (listing every rookie above .400).

Unlike other record books that only list the record holders -- say, most RBI by a rookie, held by Ted Williams with 145 -- SABR details every rookie to reach 100 RBI. Other record books might note the last pitcher in each league to steal home; here SABR has included every pitcher to do it. The book also includes a number of idiosyncratic features, such as a rundown of every player who has hit a triple and then stolen home, or every reliever who has won two games in one day. Many of the lists include a comments column for key historical notes and entertaining trivia (Bob Horner hit four home runs in a 1986 game, but his team lost). This is a must-have for every fan's library.

Edited by Lyle Spatz, Chairman of the Baseball Records Committee for SABR


Beabandis
For those who are figure filberts and love strange statistics, this book is for you!

This is a book produced by the Society for American Baseball Research (SABR). This is, as the book says (page vii), "intended to fill what we in SABR feel is a void in the reference publications that fans and media depend upon." It is not intended to replace standard sources of statistics, The ESPN Baseball Encyclopedia. It provides other lists, not appearing in standard references. For instance, the Introduction remarks that some reference sources include records for most RBIs by a rookie, this volume lists "every rookie who batted in at least 100 runs."

The book covers the time frame 1876-2006. And comparing statistics across these periods is extraordinarily difficult!

Records are listed in numerical order from 001 to 740 (thus, there are 740 records examined). 001 is Most career games played (Pete Rose is # 1 with 3562); 740 is "Families with 3 or more brothers who played in the major leagues" (the Delahanty's are # 1 with 5 brothers playing in the bigs). By the way, both records are in the The Baseball Encyclopedia, if memory serves. But what records are included in between!

Some random picks: Worst fielding average by a first baseman since 1946. One player dominates with 3 of the 4 crummiest fielding averages. Any guess? Dr. Strangeglove--Dick Stuart (1961, 1963, 1964). Here's something exotic: Pinch-hit home run and one other home run in a game: This has happened 26 times (all with 1), the most recent being Jeff Salazar (Chicago White Sox) in 2006. What about most homers in a season without winning the home run title? Sammy Sosa, of course, with 66 in 1998.

Another intriguing hitting record: Most career RBIs without a 100 RBI season. Pete Rose ranks # 1 here. Others in the top 10 include Eddie Collins, Craig Biggio, Sam Rice, and Julio Franco. And how's this? Game-ending extra-inning home runs (16th inning and later)? The most recent is Ramon Martinez in 2006; the earliest was Charley ("Old Hoss") Radbourne, in 1886.

One last tidbit. Best stolen base duo in a season? With 246 steals, Arlie Latham (129) and Charlie ("Old Roman") Comiskey (117) in 1887. From1898 to the present? Vince Coleman (110) and Willie McGee (56), for a total of 166 in 1985.

Anyhow, this book is a hoot for those who like offbeat statistics. Despite the book's claim, you will find some of these statistics elsewhere. But there are some interesting off-the-beaten-path stats.
Cobandis
This fine book has been edited into eight sections: Batting,Pitching,fielding and base running records,as well as rookie and miscellaneous records. Also included are a list index and player index. Just about any unusual record one might imagine is included. Many are broken down as totals and then by right,left and switch hit batters as well as right and left handed pitchers. Several interesting illustrations are most career grand slam home runs
Lou Gehrig (23),best career strikeout to home run ratio Joe DiMaggio (1.02)most career home runs without ever hitting 30 in a season Al Kaline(389),most career shutouts Walter Johnson(110),most career strikeout by a pitcher Nolan Ryan(5714)most consecutive strikeouts Tom Seaver (10-1970), most RBI's in a season by a rookie Ted Williams(145-1939)most consecutive wins in a season by a time N.Y. Giants(26-1916,most career steals of home Ty Cobb(54). This list covers seasons 1876-2006. Many of the records are broken down between pre and since 1893. And don't think just the top players of a category are listed. In many cases the best forty or fifty are shown. All told there are 740 record categories. Tremendous job that should be in every serious baseball library.
DEAD-SHOT
This book contains a lot of statistics that you can't find anywhere else. It may be easy to find out who has, say, the largest number of doubles ever, but in this book you'll find the ranking of the highest ones, going down, for some statistics, to the top 50 or the top 100. You'll also find lists broken down by position, as well as by handedness (lefthanded, righthanded, or switch-hitting). There are also some odd statistics that you'll never find anywhere, such as managers by number of times ejected by an umpire from the game!

You do, of course, have to be a baseball fan, and the sort of baseball fan who relishes looking up all sorts of statistics, to enjoy this book. I am, so I really enjoyed digging into it.
Ttyr
Deep inside this book is a list of home-road disparities in home runs. One of the top seasons of all time, for the more unusual situation where the home park disfavored the hitter, was Alex Rodriguez in 2000, his only full season at Safeco Field. Here was a stat that, in ways the media never really covered, explained as much as anything why he fled for free agency. This book is filled with stats like this.

A great thing you learn, for instance, is that for some statistics, left handed pitchers or right handed batters have far less impressive stats than those who bat or pitch the other way. The career stats of left-handed closers, for instance, are pretty pathetic compared to right-handers.

And then there are the categories where a single individual just blows the competition away. Strikeouts per nine-innings in a season? Randy Johnson is simply God. Frank Thomas has some very impressive on-base stats. Great stuff.

My only complaint is that the fielding stats are pretty boring and useless. Errors are not a good measure of a fielder's prowess, and there are endless stats about errors and fielding percentage. Waste of good space, in my opinion.

But it's a fun book, good bathroom reading, recommended.
Miromice
a boring chore if you sit down to read from cover to cover.
like reading recipe after recipe.

it is great to check on a particular player, or a particular stat.

it's probably most fun just to open to a random page and read about a famous stat that you THOUGHT you knew about, a new stat you learn about, something new about a player you have known about for years, or a new player you see from a stat page, then try to learn more about him.