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by Linda H. Pololi
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Women's Studies
  • Author:
    Linda H. Pololi
  • ISBN:
    1584655674
  • ISBN13:
    978-1584655671
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Dartmouth (September 14, 2010)
  • Pages:
    200 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Women's Studies
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1768 kb
  • ePUB format
    1259 kb
  • DJVU format
    1148 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    275
  • Formats:
    lrf mobi lrf lit


Pololi looks closely at women medical faculty’s experiences as outsiders in medicine, opening a. .This book made me think a lot. It is a true reflection of current realities in Academic Medicine.

Pololi looks closely at women medical faculty’s experiences as outsiders in medicine, opening a window into medical culture. She argues that placing more women and people of color in leadership positions would provide transformative and more effective leadership to improve health care and would help address current inequities in the health care provided to different racial and cultural groups. It will do the medical community some good if they assigned it as mandatory reading for their faculty members.

Energized and productive faculty are critical to academic medicine, yet studies indicate a lack of advancement and senior roles . Pololi LH. Changing the Culture of Academic Medicine. Perspectives of Women Faculty. Hanover: Dartmouth College Press; 2010.

Energized and productive faculty are critical to academic medicine, yet studies indicate a lack of advancement and senior roles for women. Using measures of key aspects of the culture of academic medicine, this study sought to identify similarity and dissimilarity between perceptions of the culture by male and female faculty. The C - Change Faculty Survey was used to collect data on perceptions of organizational culture. 27. Schindler BA, Novack DH, Cohen DG, et al.

Discover new books on Goodreads. See if your friends have read any of Linda H. Pololi's books. Changing the Culture of Academic Medicine: Perspectives of Women Faculty. Linda H. Pololi’s Followers. None yet. Pololi. Pololi’s books.

the Culture of Academic Medicine : Perspectives of Women Faculty. in senior and leadership positions in the nation's academic medical centers. Why is this the case? Pololi's study, based on extensive interviews

Changing the Culture of Academic Medicine : Perspectives of Women Faculty. Over the past twenty-five years, steadily increasing numbers of women have graduated as physicians, in sufficient numbers to be well represented in senior and leadership positions in the nation's academic medical centers. Yet women's expected advancement has stalled. Women rarely hold decision-making positions, and female department chairs or deans continue to be exceedingly rare.

Changing the Culture of Academic Medicine: Perspectives of Women Faculty Sep 14, 2010.

She has served in professorial and administrative posts within the schools of medicine at the University of Illinois at Chicago, Brown University, East Carolina University, and the University of Massachusetts, and in numerous educational advisory groups. Changing the Culture of Academic Medicine: Perspectives of Women Faculty Sep 14, 2010.

the reality for academic medicine today

Pololi is senior scientist, Brandeis University, and director, National Initiative on Gender, Culture, and Leadership in Medicine: C - Change, Waltham, Massachusetts. the reality for academic medicine today. In 1980, women constituted 29% of students admitted to medical schools, and this proportion has increased steadily

Linda Pololi, MBBS, FRCP

Linda Pololi, MBBS, FRCP.

Linda Pololi of Brandeis University, Waltham. This article describes the structure, activities and evaluation of a culture change project: the C - Change Learning Action Network (LAN) and its impact on participants View. Changing the Culture of Academic Medicine: The C-Change Learning Action Network and Its Impact at Participating Medical Schools.

Over the past twenty-five years, steadily increasing numbers of women have graduated as physicians, in sufficient numbers to be well represented in senior and leadership positions in the nation’s academic medical centers. Yet women’s expected advancement has stalled. Women rarely hold decision-making positions, and female department chairs or deans continue to be exceedingly rare.Why is this the case?Pololi’s study, based on extensive interviews, illuminates medical school culture and shows a sharp disconnect between the values of individual faculty members and the values of academic institutions of medicine. Pololi looks closely at women medical faculty’s experiences as outsiders in medicine, opening a window into medical culture. She argues that placing more women and people of color in leadership positions would provide transformative and more effective leadership to improve health care and would help address current inequities in the health care provided to different racial and cultural groups.

Vudozilkree
Useful history of women in academic medicine with a recent qualitative study of academic women. chockfull of data and quotes.
Cointrius
To some readers of Changing the Culture of Academic Medicine: Perspectives of Women Faculty, the profound and far-reaching results of Linda Pololi's scholarly and professional probe into the glaring absence of women faculty in academic medicine will be starting and perhaps even alarming. Yet, if readers follow her in-depth research to its conclusion, they will grasp the necessity and possibility for meaningful change in women's leadership - in medical research, teaching, and scholarship, in the practice of medicine, and, ultimately, in the delivery of medical care. There is no question that Pololi has broken through the silence (and the silenced) by uncovering the social, political and institutional barriers to women's full participation in the medical field. There is no turning back. Although this book is intended for and will appeal to more than one audience, the perspective will definitely resonate with women (and some men) at all levels of the medical profession in ways that matter.
Louise Lopman, Ph.D.
Sharpmane
While the data presented in this book is quite sobering, it successfully highlights the reality of the predominant culture in medicine today. One could argue that it applies not only to academic medicine but medical institutions in general. Many of the experiences detailed by the women physicians interviewed are still all too common (albeit to a lesser extent) in the business world as well. Professional women, minorities and some males recount similar roadblocks that inhibit medicine and business from benefiting from the knowledge and talents of the individuals in these groups. The elements noted will validate many faculty (and clinical) women's experiences and can serve as a rallying cry for change. The culture of medicine must change to stem the tide of discouraged dedicated physicians who are decreasing their engagement or leaving medicine altogether. We can't afford to loose this valuable resource. Linda Pololi's work is a step toward a better future.
Eayaroler
Young people and their teachers who feel that feminist activism is no longer necessary should read Linda Pololi's excellent book. The stories of women medical faculty who still experience discrimination, isolation and limits to their ability to shape and lead projects according to their own vision and values reveal that much needs to be done to address continued patriarchal attitudes and practices. Women have entered graduate programs in Medicine, Law and Business in equal or nearly equal numbers to men, but the culture of these and other professions needs to change to utilize their talents and perspectives to produce both personal satisfaction and social and economic growth. Recommended not only for medical schools, but for college and university career planning personnel, students considering their professional futures and faculty and staff who advise them.
Shem
Linda Pololi describes a community that I am not involved with but most certainly sounds familiar. It is not a stretch to see how these dynamics play out in other arenas and reading this book will be helpful for women in many fields. I feel great admiration for the women participating in this study, for those of them who continued to work there way through the hurdles and for those who chose to leave. I have a daughter about to move from residency into academic medicine and will certainly give this book to her, and hope that she will find herself in a school where these ideas are respected. Thank you Linda for writing this accessible book, it should be required reading for any one in 'power" in academic medicine!
fightnight
While this book's obvious appeal is to those in academic medicine, I have found that it is also of great interest to women in medical school, just beginning to face the issues that Dr. Pololi explores in such great detail. As the mother of a daughter in med school, I look at her experiences through a different lens, thanks to this book, and I pay much more attention to the role that women and minorities play in her academic experiences. Dr. Pololi's very accessible writing proved to be a great guide to issues that would otherwise be unknown to those of us outside the field.
Ventelone
This book, based on systematic research and surveys of medical school faculty, offers remarkable insights into the culture of medical schools and thereby illustrate the underlying cause of many problems in the health care system. Pololi notes, for example: "Interviewees described an intensely individualistic, competitive environment where rewards usually went to individual accomplishments. . . .[I]ndividuals and institutions tended to function on behalf of their self-interest, making decisions and choices that benefited themselves rather than contributing to the common good -- and sometimes came at the expense of the common good. The system is designed to create barriers at all levels to collaboration and collegiality." We can easily draw the connection between all this and patient care. It is obvious that process improvement is hampered when there is a lack of trust, collegiality, and collaboration among the medical staff. But sadder still, consider the implications for those being treated. The lesson is clear: Clinical and administrative leaders in hospitals must strive to undo the culture that is embedded in these centers of learning and help those who have devoted their lives to alleviating human suffering to start, first, to alleviate their own suffering and sense of loneliness and isolation.