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by Paul Finkelman
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Sociology
  • Author:
    Paul Finkelman
  • ISBN:
    0824067908
  • ISBN13:
    978-0824067908
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Garland Science; 1 edition (February 1, 1990)
  • Pages:
    581 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Sociology
  • Language:
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    1128 kb
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New York: Garland Publishing, In. 1989. Abstract views reflect the number of visits to the article landing page

New York: Garland Publishing, In. Abstract views reflect the number of visits to the article landing page. Views captured on Cambridge Core between

Paul Finkelman (born November 15, 1949, in Brooklyn, New York) is an American legal historian, who in 2017 became President of Gratz College, Melrose Park, Pennsylvania.

Paul Finkelman (born November 15, 1949, in Brooklyn, New York) is an American legal historian, who in 2017 became President of Gratz College, Melrose Park, Pennsylvania (the oldest independent institution of Jewish learning in the United States).

1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read.

Paul Finkelman is an American legal historian.

First Published in 1990  . 0824067908 (ISBN13: 9780824067908). Paul Finkelman is an American legal historian. He received his undergraduate degree in American studies from Syracuse University in 1971, and his master's degree (1972) and doctorate (1976) in American history from the University of Chicago. Books by Paul Finkelman.

Articles on American Slavery. Curated articles & papers on various economics topics. New York: Garland Publishing, In. Upload your paper to be listed on RePEc and IDEAS.

As a response to Time on the Cross, academic economist Paul A. David, the Professor Emeritus and Senior . Paul A. David, Reckoning with Slavery: A Critical Study in the Quantitative History of American Negro Slavery (New York: Oxford University Press, 1976).

David concludes Time on the Cross is full of errors.

This article discusses the importance of including the topic of slavery in constitutional law classes. In the years preceding the Civil War, slavery was one of the most important economic institutions in the United States. Today, however, slavery is rarely mentioned in depth in modern constitutional law classes. By omitting the topic of slavery, students receive a skewed and incomplete view of the development of the Constitution. Finkelman, Paul, Teaching Slavery in American Constitutional Law (2000).

Coverage begins just prior to the American Revolution, including the Revolution, the framing of the American Constitution, the organization of a new national government, the development of the party system, the Louisiana Purchase, the second war with Britain, the acquisition of Florida and the Monroe Doctrine. Chronologically, this period is roughly from 1754 (beginning of the Seven Years' War) to the inauguration of President Andrew Jackson (1829).

That volume, subtitled The Economics of American Negro Slavery . And as expected, Fogel and Engerman, and their students, published articles that defended their findings.

That volume, subtitled The Economics of American Negro Slavery, was described on the jacket cover as a sweeping reexamination of the economic foundations of American Negro slavery. The text continued in that bold and provocative style. The book was intended to do more than just straighten out the traditional interpretation of the economics of slavery. It aimed to strike down the view that black Americans were without culture, without achievement, and without development for their first two hundred and fifty years on American soil (p. 258).

First Published in 1990. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.