» » Trust: Reaching the 100 Million Missing Voters and Other Selected Essays

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by Farai Chideya
Download Trust: Reaching the 100 Million Missing Voters and Other Selected Essays fb2
Sociology
  • Author:
    Farai Chideya
  • ISBN:
    1932360263
  • ISBN13:
    978-1932360264
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Soft Skull Press (August 25, 2004)
  • Pages:
    224 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Sociology
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1478 kb
  • ePUB format
    1789 kb
  • DJVU format
    1799 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    578
  • Formats:
    doc mbr azw rtf


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This equates to approximately 100 million Americans. That is 100 million people who are unwilling, whatever the reason, to stand up and be heard during the upcoming Presidential election. With the 2000 presidential election, recent history is a prime example that each and every vote counts.

The 2000 election highlighted the rift between and "Red State"/ "Blue State.

Trust: Reaching the 100 Million Missing Voters and Other Selected Essays.

The book takes place just months before 9/11 and is rooted in the ethos of the Black Rock movement and the New York club scene. Trust: Reaching the 100 Million Missing Voters and Other Selected Essays.

Manufacturers, suppliers and others provide what you see here, and we have not verified it. See our disclaimer. In these provocative pieces, the author of "Don't Believe the Hype" looks at and beyond the daily political struggles to the heart of a nation at war with itself.

She urged people to not only concern themselves with the 2004 presidential election but the elections of many years to come. She described the missing voters as the youth of America as well as individuals that don’t belong to either the Republican or Democratic party. Miles Marshall Lewis joined the discussions and spoke about voting and the hip-hop culture. But that superficial crack in our society actually is evidence of much more serious, indeed foundational, damage in our society

Her novel Kiss the Sky (Atria Books) was released in hardcover May 2009.

Her novel Kiss the Sky (Atria Books) was released in hardcover May 2009.

The 2000 election highlighted the rift between and Red State/Blue State. The United States, she argues, lacks the moral, legal, and psychological framework for debating complex issues in a pluralistic society, relying instead on an outdated dichotomy model that says each issue has two opposing sides instead of many interested parties.

In other words, Trust can now more easily reach the 100 million missing voters the essay collection is focused o. How can we give the book away for free online? The publishers, Soft Skull Press, gave us permission to release the book under a Creative Commons License.

In other words, Trust can now more easily reach the 100 million missing voters the essay collection is focused on. You can download the first three chapters here, with more to follow as the election continues on. From Pop + Politics . Creative Commons is an amazing project that allows books, art, and information to be free, with the permission of the people who created it. That’s it. This is yours.

Where are the 100 million people who failed to vote in 2000 and are unlikely to vote in 2004? Political analyst Farai Chideya looks beyond day-to-day political struggles to the heart of a nation at war with itself. The 2000 election highlighted the rift between liberal/conservative and "Red State"/ "Blue State." But that superficial crack in our society actually is evidence of much more serious, indeed foundational, damage in our society. The United States, Chideya argues, lacks the moral, legal, and psychological framework for debating complex issues in a pluralistic society. Instead we rely on an outdated idea of dichotomy, that each issue has two opposing sides instead of many interested parties. And in so doing, we have lost, in effect disenfranchised, half the country.Chideya’s title essay compliments many other ones written in the course of covering campaigns and controversies. She skips the easy answer, showing how black/white thinking (a key element of the Bush Adminstration) restricts our moral and political responses. A real democracy will allow us to acknowledge the complexity of our own lives, as well as our political interests. As we do that, we will be able to craft a working vision of government and civic life.

Vudomuro
America is often called the home of the free and the land of the brave. Free - what is this really? Does our political democratic structure provide these freedoms which we've come to recognize and seemingly take for granted? As Americans, there seems to be a prevailing sense of cynicism clouding our thoughts of the whole democratic process. In her book, TRUST, political analyst Farai Chideya delves into engaging discussions regarding the prevailing political climate that is blanketing America.

The United States of America is a dominating powerhouse in the world arena when it comes to international policy; yet, within our own borders less than half of the qualifying electorate does not vote. This equates to approximately 100 million Americans. That is 100 million people who are unwilling, whatever the reason, to stand up and be heard during the upcoming Presidential election. In her essays, Chideya digs into the historical past of America's political structure, prevailing sentiments and offers candid, flowing commentary based on her observations.

With the 2000 presidential election, recent history is a prime example that each and every vote counts. Chideya states, "American democracy is highly overrated, not necessarily in concept, but in its execution." Chideya is urging for a dynamic change to take place within our current political structure and within the Black community - the commonly disenfranchised voters require a confident resurgence in exercising their own basic rights. In Chideya's opinion, this reinvigoration

will take place only by "rebuilding people's trust in government and their trust to shape it."

All in all, Ms. Chideya offers very timely, easy-to-understand commentary regarding mostly the political structure of the United States. This type of book does not hail from my usually preferred genre, yet the essays captured my attention and provided me with a deeper understanding of some very relevant current day situations within our political structure. Anyone seeking greater knowledge and sound opinion, should definitely check out TRUST.

Reviewed by Nedine

of The RAWSISTAZ Reviewers
Kajishakar
Ms. Chideya's writing is clear and engaging. It is also well-informed, although occasionally venturing into hysterical overstatement - e.g., labelling the Presidential Election of 2000 "A Devastating Blow to American Democracy." And the book contains some interesting material: A good historical sketch of our evolution toward universal suffrage (or what passes for it); a listing of and commentary on the responses of the Democratic Presidential hopefuls debate in 2003 (which Ms. Chideya moderated) to her question, "What is your favorite song?"; an appendix of information on voting in each of the 50 states and DC.

Unfortunately, Ms. Chideya is writing with a heavily biased agenda, most colorfully expressed on page 91: "The only thing worse than having a marvelous booty call, only to find that the person you're waking up next to is a Republican, is finding out that one of your best friends so loathes the political system that she has not voted and will not vote." (I also enjoyed her description of the editorial writers of the Wall Street Journal as "patently insane" - p. 165.)

In other words, under the veneer of caring about American Democracy and the effect of non-voters on it in a broad sense, her true concern is that the particular agenda she would like our government to follow is frustrated because so many of its/her natural constiutuents don't vote. Such a bias is to be expected if one is writing as a politician or political advocate, but not if one is posing as an objective commentator.

Ms. Chideya also diminishes her credibility by engaging in victim-speak, e.g., asserting that "Half of [eligible] voters have been shut out from the get-go", and stating without meaningful evidence that Bush won the 2000 election due to widespread and systematic intimidation and disenfranchisement of minorities.

In short, the members of Ms. Chideya's choir are likely to extol her preaching. Others may enjoy her writing, and may learn something, but are unlikely to be persuaded to change their views or actions by anything in this book. Those looking for a serious analysis of voting and non-voting patterns in the U.S. should look elsewhere.