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by Jeanette Winterson
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Social Sciences
  • Author:
    Jeanette Winterson
  • ISBN:
    0307401251
  • ISBN13:
    978-0307401250
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Vintage Canada (July 31, 2012)
  • Pages:
    240 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Social Sciences
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1203 kb
  • ePUB format
    1551 kb
  • DJVU format
    1574 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    549
  • Formats:
    rtf docx mobi doc


Ingenious (BBC TV). Jeanette Winterson.

Ingenious (BBC TV). Be Normal? Grove Press. Scanning, uploading, and electronic distribution of this book or the facilitation of such without the permission of the publisher is prohibited.

In Why Be Happy, emotional life is laid bare "Stunningly lovely and fearlessly reflective, Why Be Happy is a reminder of what the project of remembering and recording can-and should-be.

In Why Be Happy, emotional life is laid bare. struggle to first accept and then love herself yields a bravely frank narrative of truly coming undone. To read Jeanette Winterson is to love he. "Stunningly lovely and fearlessly reflective, Why Be Happy is a reminder of what the project of remembering and recording can-and should-be. About survival and triumph but also about deep wounds.

When she had nothing, she always had her books: they gave her courage and strength. Can you trust any author to be who they say they are or is it all just for effect? I guess so long as the money keeps rolling in its all 'true', and when the money stops - maybe that's time for a tell-all autobiography with tv interviews revealing all the psychological problems that stopped the author from telling the truth in the first place.

Jeanette Winterson's memoir is written sparsely and hurriedly; it is sometimes so terse it's almost in note form

Jeanette Winterson's memoir is written sparsely and hurriedly; it is sometimes so terse it's almost in note form. The impression this gives is not of sloppiness, but a desperate urgency to make the reader understand. This is certainly the most moving book of Winterson's I have ever read, and it also feels like the most turbulent and the least controlled.

In 1985 Jeanette Winterson’s first novel, Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit, was published ‘This is certainly the most moving book of Winterson’s I have ever rea. ut it wriggles with humou. t one point I was crying so much I had tears in my ears.

In 1985 Jeanette Winterson’s first novel, Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit, was published. It was Jeanette’s version of the story of a terraced house in Accrington, an adopted child, and the thwarted giantess Mrs Winterson. It was a cover story, a painful past written over and repainted. It was a story of survival. This book is that story’s the silent twin. This is certainly the most moving book of Winterson’s I have ever rea. There is much here that is impressive, but what I find most unusual about it is the way it deepens one’s sympathy, for everyone involved’ Zoe Williams Guardian.

Jeanette Winterson’s Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit (1985), written when she was 24, won the Whitbread prize . The essential point of Ms. Winterson’s singular and electric new memoir, Why Be Happy When You Could Be Normal? however, is that she didn’t find a boat.

Jeanette Winterson’s Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit (1985), written when she was 24, won the Whitbread prize for a first novel in Britain and marked her as a raw and devious talent. That novel, about a girl who is adopted by Pentecostal parents and discovers she is sexually attracted to women, was partly autobiographical. None were waiting for her. She built one for herself.

In 1985 Jeanette Winterson's first novel, Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit, was published. This book is that story's the silent twin. It is full of hurt and humour and a fierce love of life. It was Jeanette's version of the story of a terraced house in Accrington, an adopted child, and the thwarted giantess Mrs Winterson. It is generous, honest and true.

Explanations, analysis, and visualizations of Why Be Happy When You Could Be. .

Explanations, analysis, and visualizations of Why Be Happy When You Could Be Normal?'s themes. Why Be Happy?: Quotes. A prolific writer, Winterson is the author of over twenty-five books of fiction, nonfiction, and literature for children. She is married to the writer and psychoanalyst Susie Orbach, and she teaches at the University of Manchester.

It had a copy of Gertrude Stein's The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas (1932). When I was sixteen I had only got as far as M – not counting Shakespeare, who is not part of the alphabet, any more. than black is a colour. Black is all the colours and Shakespeare is all the alphabet. I was reading his plays and sonnets the way that you get dressed every morning. You don't ask yourself, ‘Shall I get dressed today?’. On the days you don't get dressed you are not well enough, either mentally or physically, to be able to ask – but we will go there later. M was the seventeenth-century poet, Andrew Marvell.

In 1985, at twenty-five, Jeanette published Oranges, the story of a girl adopted by Pentecostal parents, supposed to grow up to be a missionary. Instead, she falls in love with a woman. Disaster. Oranges became an international bestseller, inspired an award-winning BBC adaptation, and was semi-autobiographical. Mrs. Winterson, a thwarted giantess, loomed over the novel and the author's life. When Jeanette left home at sixteen because she was in love with a woman, Mrs. Winterson asked her: Why be happy when you could be normal? This is Jeanette's story--acute, fierce, celebratory--of a life's work to find happiness: a search for belonging, love, identity, a home. About a young girl locked out of her home, sitting on the doorstep all night, and a mother waiting for Armageddon with two sets of false teeth and a revolver in the duster drawer; about growing up in a northern industrial town; about the Universe as a Cosmic Dustbin. It is also about other people's stories, showing how fiction and poetry can form a string of guiding lights, a life raft that supports us when we are sinking.


Hystana
"Books, for me, are a home. Books don't make a home-they are one, in the sense that just as you do with a door, you open a book, and you go inside. Inside there is a different kind of time and a different kind of space. There is warmth there too - a hearth. I sit down with a book and I am warm. I know that from the chilly nights on the doorstep." pg. 61

Jeanette Winterson grew up in an unhappy, abusive, and religious Pentecostal family. She was adopted at a young age and her mother planned to mold her into a missionary of God. Yet Jeanette heard time and time again that her parents were led to the wrong crib. Jeanette grew up with the knowledge that she never really belonged. She didn't belong to her adoptive parents, she didn't belong to her birth parents, she didn't belong to her public school because she was so religious and she didn't belong to her church because she was a lesbian. She spent many nights outside, alone on her doorstep.

She was kicked out of her home at the age of 16 and was homeless living in her car. Growing up, books were forbidden in her house and so the library became a haven and she began to read every author from A to Z in English Literature. She applied to Oxford and to her surprise got in as the "working class" experiment. Jeanette then writes her first book, Oranges are Not the Only Fruit, when she was 24. Some words of advice: Read Oranges are Not the Only Fruit before you read this book. It will make a big difference.

I once heard that if you don't deal with the trauma of your past, that the trauma will find you and make you deal with it. Well that is what happened to Jeanette. She sunk into a type of madness, became depressed and emerged forever changed. When Jeanette decides to go on with her life she then makes the decision to find her birth mother.

Why Be Happy When You Could Be Normal is an amazing memoir. It is not told in a linear fashion but it is full of life and passion. Complex, yet simply told, Winterson bares her soul, telling her readers that she never learned how to love nor how to be loved. Why Be Happy When You Could Be Normal is an explanation of her book, Oranges and a confession of a very painful past. She divulges her tumultuous past with style, wit and grace all the while showing her readers, wisdom and the strength to endure. I was so inspired and riveted to Jeanette's story and have many passages of wisdom marked in my book. This memoir is deeply personal to Winterson and to me, as the reader. I felt I was looking into the window of her soul.

"Nobody can feel too much, though many of us work very hard at feeling too little.
Feeling is frightening.
Well, I find it so."
Pg. 187
HappyLove
Ever run across a book and an author that just bends your mind? This is how I felt as soon as I started the audio unabridged version of this book, and so had to buy the paperback as well. It is read by the author and what a reading it is. I cannot remember when I have delighted in a book as much as I have this one and especially the vocal done by the author herself.

It's a hard story. Much of the early part is a little hard to take, but sometimes it seems that people go through tough things and come out stronger on the other end. This seems to be the case with the woman who took charge of her education at Cambridge, and then became the author of many books, one of which became a TV presentation.

Having never heard of Jeanette Winterson made it all the more interesting. There is such talent out in the world that we've never heard of and when we find them, when they touch us with that special touch, we are instantly changed for the better. Since I am a huge audible.com fan and am constantly downloading books there, this book was a recommendation by them and I'm so glad they did.

I delighted in virtually every word, every inflection, and how love prevails, even when it doesn't seem like love. It all depends on our perspective.

I cannot recommend this book enough and especially the unabridged audiobook. Bravo!
Phain
Jeanette Winterson's way of describing the almost indescribable brought tears to my eyes more than once. All my life, I've searched for these words to describe being an orphan and, after that, being abandoned. The life of forever seeking a lost part of yourself, of not knowing how to love and the crippling, incapacitating fear of loss. The poetry of her language is breathtaking and I finished reading with a sigh...Jeanette Winterson understands and speaks for all the lost ones.
Oppebro
Even if, like me, you are not a fan of Jeanette Winterson, you might want to give this book a read. It's not your typical memoir, but then, Jeanette Winterson's story is not your typical biography either. She was adopted at six weeks of age as an only child living with a fanatically religious mother. Cruelty and sometimes isolation ensued (being tossed into the "coal hole" or left out on the doorstep overnight), certainly not the fare the average British child grows up having endure. But endure she does. In the end, the craziness of her upbringing becomes a rather dark gift -- one that Jeanette Winterson, herself, is willing to recognize when later she meets her biological mother and finds she cannot bear to hear the criticism heaped by her bio-mother on her monstrous adopted mother. I found this memoir more than touching -- for me it was a fascinating glimpse into working class England circa 1960s, it was a poignant and sometimes searing glance into the human soul -- this book vacillates between humor and horror, between pleaure and pain. In the end, we are left with a curiously optimistic view -- out of all of this adversity sprung a fully formed, successful author -- one whose underlying quality is that of absolute tensile strength.

One is left to wonder, without that struggle to survive, what does a writer really have to write?

(This review was not one of those Amazon reviews you've been reading about -- it was not paid for nor solicited -- I bought this book in a bookstore because I thought it looked interesting and I read it cover to cover.)