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by Gayatri Gopinath
Download Impossible Desires: Queer Diasporas and South Asian Public Cultures (Perverse Modernities: A Series Edited by Jack Halberstam and Lisa Lowe) fb2
Social Sciences
  • Author:
    Gayatri Gopinath
  • ISBN:
    0822335131
  • ISBN13:
    978-0822335139
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Duke University Press Books (April 19, 2005)
  • Pages:
    264 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Social Sciences
  • Language:
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  • DJVU format
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  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    810
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Impossible Desires stands as a pathbreaking work, addressing persistent exclusions in both feminist and queer literatures on South Asian public culture and significantly reworking current conceptualizations of diaspora. Lawrence Cohen Journal of Asian Studies).

Impossible Desires stands as a pathbreaking work, addressing persistent exclusions in both feminist and queer literatures on South Asian public culture and significantly reworking current conceptualizations of diaspora. Boldly spanning Hindi film, British Asian music, Urdu literature, diasporic postcolonial literature and film, .

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By bringing queer theory to bear on ideas of diaspora, Gayatri Gopinath produces both a more compelling queer theory .

By bringing queer theory to bear on ideas of diaspora, Gayatri Gopinath produces both a more compelling queer theory and a more nuanced understanding of diaspora. Focusing on queer female diasporic subjectivity, Gopinath develops a theory of diaspora apart from the logic of blood, authenticity, and patrilineal descent that she argues invariably forms the core of conventional formulations.

Queer Diasporas and South Asian Public Cultures. More about this series. Book Pages: 264 Illustrations: 12 b&w photos Published: April 2005. Author: Gayatri Gopinath. Subjects Asian Studies South Asia, Cultural Studies, Gender and Sexuality LGBTQ Studies. fascinating study of queer diasporas and South Asian public cultures. Vijay Mishra, Year's Work in Critical and Cultural Theory.

Title: Impossible Desires Author: Gopinath, Gayatri Publisher: Duke Univ .

Title: Impossible Desires Author: Gopinath, Gayatri Publisher: Duke Univ Pr Publication Date: 2005/05/01 Number of Pages: 247 Binding Type: PAPERBACK Library of Congress: 2004027163. By bringing queer theory to bear on ideas of diaspora, Gayatri Gopinath produces both a more compelling queer theory and a more nuanced understanding of diaspora.

Find books like Impossible Desires: Queer Diasporas and South Asian .

Find books like Impossible Desires: Queer Diasporas and South Asian Public Cultures from the world’s largest community of readers. Goodreads members who. Focusing on queer female diasporic . ore. There is more to identity than identifying with one’s culture or standing solidly against it. José Esteban Muñoz looks at how those outside the racial and sexual mainstream negotiate majority cultur.

The queer South Asian characters Gopinath analyzes critique both the .

The queer South Asian characters Gopinath analyzes critique both the male nationalist and heteronormative feminist discourses that represent them. With a focus on South Asian public cultures, Gayatri Gopinath's book Impossible Desires launches a major contribution to these debates. Your work points out that one thing that wasn’t talked about in relation to gender was female masculinity. It was a gap in feminism and gender studies, so hence your book Female Masculinity.

Perverse Modernities. and La Iwe : IMPOSSIBLE DESIRES Queer Diasporas and South Asian Public Cultures Gayatri Gopinath Duke (Jniversity Press Durham and London zoo5 groundbreaking film about queer interracial desire in Thatcherite Britain, the white, working-class gay boyJohnny moves ro unbutton the shirt of his lover' the upwardly mobile, Pakistan-born Omar. Omar initially acquiesces to Johnny's caresses, but then abruptly puts a halt to the seduction.

Read "Impossible Desires Queer Diasporas and South Asian Public Cultures" by. .Queer Diasporas and South Asian Public Cultures. by Gayatri Gopinath, Judith Halberstam, Lisa Lowe. series Perverse Modernities.

Impossible Desires – Queer Diasporas and South Asian Public Cultures by Gayatri Gopinath. Swimming in the Monsoon Sea by Shyam Selvadurai.

By bringing queer theory to bear on ideas of diaspora, Gayatri Gopinath produces both a more compelling queer theory and a more nuanced understanding of diaspora. Focusing on queer female diasporic subjectivity, Gopinath develops a theory of diaspora apart from the logic of blood, authenticity, and patrilineal descent that she argues invariably forms the core of conventional formulations. She examines South Asian diasporic literature, film, and music in order to suggest alternative ways of conceptualizing community and collectivity across disparate geographic locations. Her agile readings challenge nationalist ideologies by bringing to light that which has been rendered illegible or impossible within diaspora: the impure, inauthentic, and nonreproductive.

Gopinath juxtaposes diverse texts to indicate the range of oppositional practices, subjectivities, and visions of collectivity that fall outside not only mainstream narratives of diaspora, colonialism, and nationalism but also most projects of liberal feminism and gay and lesbian politics and theory. She considers British Asian music of the 1990s alongside alternative media and cultural practices. Among the fictional works she discusses are V. S. Naipaul’s classic novel A House for Mr. Biswas, Ismat Chughtai’s short story “The Quilt,” Monica Ali’s Brick Lane, Shyam Selvadurai’s Funny Boy, and Shani Mootoo’s Cereus Blooms at Night. Analyzing films including Deepa Mehta’s controversial Fire and Mira Nair’s Monsoon Wedding, she pays particular attention to how South Asian diasporic feminist filmmakers have reworked Bollywood’s strategies of queer representation and to what is lost or gained in this process of translation. Gopinath’s readings are dazzling, and her theoretical framework transformative and far-reaching.


Fountain_tenderness
This book was disappointing. I was expecting it to detail LGBT life in South Asia in a more anthropological way. Instead it is just a bunch of pop culture references.
Uranneavo
University of California Davis's Women's Studies Professor Gayatri Gopinath, has written an impressive academic text entitled, Impossible Desires: Queer Diasporas and South Asian Public Cultures. Gopinath combines her knowledge of women's studies with her interests in a variety of academic fields on popular culture, race-sexuality, migration and South Asian cultural literature. She introduces several ways of identity formation and mediation of the "racialized" and Queer South Asian body by incorporating both feminist and queer theory within her analysis. In critical theory, the term "Queer" is a signifier of a complex defiant attitude that destabilizes any and all traditional notions of identity. It works to disrupt anything that appears too heteronormative, too "commonsensical," and too constructed. Gopinath explains that it "works to name the alternative reading of the diaspora and to dislodge it from its adherence and loyalty to nationalist ideologies that are fully aligned with the interests of transnational capitalism" (11). As a South Asian Queer feminist, Gopinath not only possess valuable critical insight, her identity gives Impossible Desires its authenticity.

The first chapter is an introduction in which Gopinath immediately brings the reader into a specific moment during the film entitled, "My Beautiful Launderette" (1985) a controversial and "groundbreaking" movie about two gay men in an interracial relationship; one male is white, Johnny and the other, Omar, is Pakistani. The movie's representation of Omar's body reverses the spectators gaze by re-situating Omar into a position of the subject and Johnny becomes the object of the spectators gaze. She describes the "queer diasporic body," as a text-- where the histories of rampant discrimination and colonialism are clearly "written" on the body. According to Gopinath, "Queer and diasporic cultural forms and practices point to submerged histories of racist and colonialist violence that continue to resonate in the present that make themselves felt though bodily desire"(4). This is an interesting statement because she describes the unstable relationship between the external and the internal parts of the "material" body, which she addresses again in the next two chapters. For Gopinath, the body they experience and conceptualize is continuously mediated by heterosexual and nationalistic constructions and popular images of culture.

Chapter 2 entitled Queer Communities of Sound examines the ways in which popular Bhangra Music and Post Bhangra Asian music allow her to situate "gender and sexuality at the very center of our understandings of diaspora, nation and globalization"(31). During the 1970s through the 1990s, Bhangra music, resonated across the world's national borders. Their songs revealed a sense growing resentment against the growing cultural conservatism in the United States and Britain and they also revealed a desire to find a homeland. Despite their radical message, Gopinath argued that their "nostalgic evocation of the homeland was mobilized through the fixed, static figure of the female, the emblem of tradition and (sexual and moral) purity." Their problematic message of an idealized woman reinforces "patrilinity and organic heterosexuality." She works in opposition to this tendency by applying Queer theory to the dialogue in order to draw attention to the "feminist diasporic cultural practices" that offer an alternative perspective.

In Chapter 3 Surviving Naipaul, Gopinath dissects three different texts:

Surviving Sabu (1996), a film by Ian Rashid, a gay Indonesian/Canadian from the UK; A novel entitled Mr. Biswas (1961), by V.S. Naipaul and East is East (2000) a film created by Damian O'Donnell. She explains how such films rely on the invisibility of a female subject in order to distinguish the gay male diasporic identity (64-65). Gopinath transfers the attention to the women by employing both feminist and queer theory in her analysis. Much of this chapter focuses on the different "modes" of producing an identity of subjectivity. Perhaps the most important concept in this chapter is that of "disidentification" which is defined as the "third mode of dealing with dominant ideology, one that neither opts to assimilate within such a structure nor strictly opposes it; [...] a strategy that works on and against dominant ideology" (68). According to

Gopinath, this strategy is not repression, but rather an awareness of self-- that people can define who they are, by who they are not and their social and individual identities overlap resulting in multiple identity formations.

Gayatri Gopinath addresses the various ways in which a queer diasporic female subjectivity can surface within a heteronormative, nationalistic environment, through her critique of South Asian popular cultural representations of the female body. South Asian films, novels and music, as revolutionary as they are, depend on the "erasure" or "invisibility" of the female subject. In Impossible Desires, Gayatri Gopinath offers a systematic critique that aims to deconstruct the knowledge and values of a dominant heterosexual nation.
Dont_Wory
I learnt so much from the way Gopinath intervenes in cultural studies of diaspora and queer studies. Her readings are beautifully framed and precise, and very attuned to the gaps and silences in given approaches. But Gopinath does much more than identify these gaps and silences, she makes a compelling case for why queer feminism is a necessary intervention that will enrich diasporic studies and interrupt its tendencies towards nostalgic nationalism. Her conception of queer desire in the diaspora is profound, and serves as a model for connecting desires to histories
Bluecliff
I have been following Gopinath's work for many years now -- from her lucid essay in Russell Leong's "Asian American Sexualities," to her review of Deepa Mehta's "Fire" and her brilliant and lucid analysis of Shyam Selvadurai's "Funny Boy." Not only is Gopinath a brilliant scholar with urgently insightful readings, but she writes with an exemplary prose that is worthy of worldwide applause. Her studies of music, film, literature, and social events coagulate to form a powerful and cogent argument for thinking about race and sexuality in what she calls a "South Asian diasporic" sensibility. What is the use of such an interpretational tool? It immediately highlights weaknesses in both feminist and postcolonial scholarship while simultaneously bringing these fields' insights to assist in her readings. "Impossible Desires" sparkles with sagacious scholarship, and makes clear the cultural stakes for all who see the identity politics of gender and sexuality as inextricable from South Asian cultural production. I am thankful that this book exists, although I am not yet finished with it. I have waited many, many years for something like this, and can say with much gratitude that it will continue to inform my own studies for many years to come. Anyone who wishes to think outside of the box of what they consider their most radical thinking should not only seriously consider purchasing this book, but should also gift a few copies to others they know who are passionate about the cultural politics of women, queers, and South Asian diasporic culture around the globe.