» » Not White Enough, Not Black Enough: Racial Identity in the South African Coloured Community (Ohio RIS Africa Series)

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by Mohamed Adhikari
Download Not White Enough, Not Black Enough: Racial Identity in the South African Coloured Community (Ohio RIS Africa Series) fb2
Social Sciences
  • Author:
    Mohamed Adhikari
  • ISBN:
    0896802442
  • ISBN13:
    978-0896802445
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Ohio University Press; 1 edition (November 17, 2005)
  • Pages:
    264 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Social Sciences
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1515 kb
  • ePUB format
    1164 kb
  • DJVU format
    1456 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    270
  • Formats:
    azw txt lit doc


Mohamed Adhikari lectures in the Department of Historical Studies, University of Cape Town.

Mohamed Adhikari lectures in the Department of Historical Studies, University of Cape Town. Considering that this marginalized group is so frequently pushed aside in favour of 'authentic' racial groups, I think the book is excellent. Along with Coloured by History, Shaped by Place (Erasmus), this is one of the books that I really rate as Adhikari have analysed the space with informative insight.

Athens: Ohio University Press, 2005. What are "Coloureds"? For most South Africans and others familiar with South Africa the answer will be "people of mixed race. One explanation for post-1994 Coloured political behavior lies in the different regimes of domination that the colonial and apartheid regimes maintained for its subject "races;" regimes that in turn highlighted and cemented differences in the way people experienced apartheid oppression or enjoyed degrees of "relative privilege.

Ohio University Press Mohamed Adhikari engages with the debates and controversies thrown u. .

Ohio University Press. 20,99 USD 9,99 USD rafbók. The nature of Coloured identity and its heritage of oppression has always been a matter of intense political and ideological contestation. Not White Enough, Not Black Enough: Racial Identity in the South African Coloured Community is the first systematic study of Coloured identity, its history, and its relevance to South African national life. Mohamed Adhikari engages with the debates and controversies thrown up by the identity’s troubled existence and challenges much of the conventional wisdom associated with it.

1 Continuity and Context: An Overview of Coloured Identity in White Supremacist South Africa.

The nature of Coloured identity, its history, and the implications it holds for South African society have evoked considerable interest in recent times. Debates around these issues have generated much controversy, yet there has been no systematic study of Coloured identity. At best, the current literature offers superficial attempts at analyzing its character or the social and political dynamic that informed Coloured exclusivism. 1 Continuity and Context: An Overview of Coloured Identity in White Supremacist South Africa.

Between Black and White: Racial Identity in the South African Coloured Community is the first systematic study .

Between Black and White: Racial Identity in the South African Coloured Community is the first systematic study of Coloured identity, its history, and its relevance to South African national life. His books include 'Let Us Live for Our Children': The Teachers' League of South Africa, 1913-1940 and Not White Enough, Not Black Enough: Racial Identity in South Africa's Coloured Community.

Adhikari demonstrates how the interplay of marginality, racial hierarchy, assimilationist aspirations, negative racial stereotyping, class divisions, and ideological . Published November 17th 2005 by Ohio University Press.

Adhikari demonstrates how the interplay of marginality, racial hierarchy, assimilationist aspirations, negative racial stereotyping, class divisions, and ideological conflicts helped mold people’s sense of Colouredness over the past century. Knowledge of this history, and of the social and political dynamic that informed the articulation of a separate Coloured identity, is vital to an understanding of present-day complexities in South Africa.

Racial identity in the south african coloured community. Africa Series No. 83. Ohio University Press. 1. Continuity and Context: An Overview of Coloured Identity in White Supremacist South Africa. 2. History from the Margins: Changing Perceptions of Its Past within the Coloured Community. 3. The Predicament of Marginality: Case Studies from the Earlier Period of White Rule. 4. The Hegemony of Race: Coloured Identity within the Radical Movement during the Mid-twentieth Century. 5. The Emperor’s New Clothes: Coloured Rejectionism during the Latter Phases of the Apartheid Era.

He does so without reducing the complexity that is the sine qua non of this category. His narrative is organized around the primary goal of assimilation and the structural constraints of a specifically Western Cape climate of political liberalism.

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Published by: Ohio University Press. Between Black and White: Racial Identity in the South African Coloured Community is the first systematic study of Coloured identity, its history, and its relevance to South African national life. Series: Ohio RIS Africa Series. Mohamed Adhikari engages with the debates and controversies thrown up by the identity?s troubled existence and challenges much of the conventional wisdom associated with it.

The concept of Colouredness—being neither white nor black—has been pivotal to the brand of racial thinking particular to South African society. The nature of Coloured identity and its heritage of oppression has always been a matter of intense political and ideological contestation.Not White Enough, Not Black Enough: Racial Identity in the South African Coloured Community is the first systematic study of Coloured identity, its history, and its relevance to South African national life. Mohamed Adhikari engages with the debates and controversies thrown up by the identity’s troubled existence and challenges much of the conventional wisdom associated with it. A combination of wide-ranging thematic analyses and detailed case studies illustrates how Colouredness functioned as a social identity from the time of its emergence in the late nineteenth century through its adaptation to the postapartheid environment.Adhikari demonstrates how the interplay of marginality, racial hierarchy, assimilationist aspirations, negative racial stereotyping, class divisions, and ideological conflicts helped mold people’s sense of Colouredness over the past century. Knowledge of this history, and of the social and political dynamic that informed the articulation of a separate Coloured identity, is vital to an understanding of present-day complexities in South Africa.


MrDog
Considering that this marginalized group is so frequently pushed aside in favour of 'authentic' racial groups, I think the book is excellent. Along with Coloured by History, Shaped by Place (Erasmus), this is one of the books that I really rate as Adhikari have analysed the space with informative insight. The evolving nature of the constant discourse on 'Coloured Identity' is also interesting (re Khoisan Revivalism) especially since there are many discussions ( at grass roots level) on notions of 'Blackness', which, considering a few South African politicians remarks over the past two years, means that, even if, as a group, it is decided move towards to Blackness... as a moniker, it is unlikely to find favour with the majority of the population.
Super P
Years ago, my college newspaper said three South African students were attending that year. Two were clearly black; the other was "of color." He looked Indian to me and I asked him how Indians were treated in his home country. He laughed and said, "In the US, ppl assume I'm Indian, Iranian, Moroccan, and more. But I would be called coloured in South Africa, AND SO WOULD YOU." (I'm an African American with two African-American parents.) I always assumed I knew who was Black and this time I was cleary wrong.
It's great that someone has written a book on those in South Africa who had both African and European ancestries. Still, unlike many scholarly books that emphasize change and social construction, the author said that coloured identity has been fairly consistent for more than a century. Further, his analysis of coloured identity today was dull and inconclusive.
This book just did not strike me as strong. Perhaps if I lived in that country or was born there I'd feel differently. I just think books about multiracial individuals in the US have been sooooo much stronger than this one.
There was something missing here, and a little boring. I can't quite put my finger on it.