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by Kenneth Hurlstone Jackson
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Social Sciences
  • Author:
    Kenneth Hurlstone Jackson
  • ISBN:
    0521134935
  • ISBN13:
    978-0521134934
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Cambridge University Press (March 2, 2011)
  • Pages:
    64 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Social Sciences
  • Language:
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Kenneth Jackson's 1964 lecture, printed here, focuses on exploring medieval and earlier Irish literature.

Kenneth Jackson's 1964 lecture, printed here, focuses on exploring medieval and earlier Irish literature. This lecture explored the possibility that the Ulster cycle of tales preserves an oral tradition of Celtic Irish society from the third and fourth centuries AD; as the background of the tales pre-dates Christian influences in the fifth century. This item: The Oldest Irish Tradition: A Window on the Iron Age. Set up a giveaway.

Prof Kenneth Hurlstone Jackson CBE FRSE FSA DLitt (1 November 1909 – 20 February 1991) was . The Oldest Irish Tradition: a window on the Iron Age, Cambridge: University Press. Harmondsworth: Penguin Books.

He demonstrated how the text of the Ulster Cycle of tales, written circa AD 1100, preserves an oral tradition originating some six centuries earlier and reflects Celtic Irish society of the third and fourth century AD. His Celtic Miscellany is a popular standard. ISBN 0-14-044247-2 (first published by Routledge & Kegan Paul in 1951).

The Oldest Irish Tradition book. Jackson intended to show that the heroic literature of Ireland, the Ulster cycle of tales, derived from 'pre-historic' oral traditions which flourished before the introduction of Christianity in the fifth century. Jackson's The Oldest Irish Tradition: A Window on the Iron Age was originally delivered as the Rede Lecture at the University of Cambridge in 1964.

H. By closely examining this body of heroic narrative, Jackson attempted to illustrate how different aspects of the social structures, customs, ethos, and material culture in the tales could provide a picture of Ireland.

Kenneth Hurlstone Jackson (1 November 1909 – 20 February 1991) was an English linguist and a translator who specialised in the . He married Janet Dall Galloway on 12 August 1936. A Historical phonology of Breton, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, Dublin, ISBN 978-01282-53-8.

by Kenneth Hurlstone Jackson. Select Format: Hardcover. ISBN13:9781861430809.

The Oldest Irish Tradition: A Window on the Iron Age by Kenneth Hurlstone Jackson. The Rede Lecture, 1964. Cambridge: University Press, 1964. 55 pp. 10s. 6d. T. G. E. Powell. Published online by Cambridge University Press: 02 January 2015. Export citation Request permission.

a window on the iron age. by Jackson, Kenneth Hurlstone.

Jackson, Kenneth Hurlstone. The oldest Irish tradition. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove The oldest Irish tradition from your list? The oldest Irish tradition. a window on the iron age.

Prof Kenneth Hurlstone Jackson CBE FRSE FSA DLitt .

The oldest Irish tradition: A window on the Iron Age, Cambridge: University Press.

Kenneth Hurlstone Jackson.

This lecture explores the possibility that the Ulster cycle of tales preserves an oral tradition from the third and fourth centuries AD. Cambridge University Press. Kenneth Hurlstone Jackson.

K. H. Jackson's The Oldest Irish Tradition: A Window on the Iron Age was originally delivered as the Rede Lecture at the University of Cambridge in 1964. Jackson intended to show that the heroic literature of Ireland, the Ulster cycle of tales, derived from 'pre-historic' oral traditions which flourished before the introduction of Christianity in the fifth century. By closely examining this body of heroic narrative, Jackson attempted to illustrate how different aspects of the social structures, customs, ethos, and material culture in the tales could provide a picture of Ireland in the Early Iron Age.