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by Christopher Carrington
Download No Place Like Home: Relationships and Family Life Among Lesbians and Gay Men fb2
Social Sciences
  • Author:
    Christopher Carrington
  • ISBN:
    0226094855
  • ISBN13:
    978-0226094854
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    University of Chicago Press; 1 edition (February 1, 2000)
  • Pages:
    285 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Social Sciences
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1272 kb
  • ePUB format
    1395 kb
  • DJVU format
    1416 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    527
  • Formats:
    mbr doc lrf lrf


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Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading No Place Like Home: Relationships and Family Life among Lesbians and Gay Men (Worlds of Desire: The Chicago Series on Sexuality, Gender, and Culture). Although far from a random sample of American gay men and lesbians, his subjects range widely in age, ethnicity, class background, and income level, although only five households with children were included.

Carrington, Christopher. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Vantage points: situating myself - Vantage points: intellectual traditions and the study of domesticity - Caring and domesticity among lesbigay families - The work and family lives of lesbigay people - Equality, egalitarianism, and fairness - The organization and method of the study - The participants - Characteristics of the participants - Domestic diversity -. - Overview - pt. 1. Feeding lesbigay families. Internet Archive Books.

Relying upon interviews and observation, the author analyzes the loves and routings of 52 diverse lesbian, gay, and bisexual couples in the Bay area. closes the work with a discussion of the raging same-sex marriage debate and posits an enlightened solution to this dilemma. Christopher Carrington.

In this rich, surprising portrait of the world of lesbian and gay relationships, Christopher Carrington unveils the complex and artful ways that gay people create and maintain both homes and "chosen" families for themselves. Worlds of Desire: The Chicago Series on Sexuality, Gender, and Culture. University of Chicago Press.

Carrington, C. (1999) No Place like Home: Relationships and Family Life among Lesbians and Gay Men (Chicago: University of Chicago Press). CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Carrington, C. CrossRefGoogle Scholar. Cooney, M. (2014) ‘Death by Family: Honour Violence as Punishment’, Punishment and Society, 16 (4), 406–427. 2007) ‘Multicultural Intricacies in Professional Counselling’, in J. Gregoire & C. Jungers (ed. The Counselor’s Companion: What Every Beginning Counsellor Needs to Know (Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum), 6. oogle Scholar.

Relationship an intensely private spiritualized union combining sexual fidelity.

Toward a new home so- cioeconomics of union formation. In L. Waite, C. Bachrach, M. Hindin, E. Thomson, & A. Thorton (Ed., Ties that bind: Perspectives on marriage and cohabitation (pp. 126-144). Hawthorne, NY: Aldine de Gruyter. Journal of Marriage and Family Glendon, M. A. (1989). Abortion and divorce in Western law. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. Relationship an intensely private spiritualized union combining sexual fidelity.

In this rich, surprising portrait of the world of lesbian and gay relationships, Christopher Carrington unveils the complex and artful ways that gay people create and maintain both homes and "chosen" families for themselves

In this rich, surprising portrait of the world of lesbian and gay relationships, Christopher Carrington unveils the complex and artful ways that gay people create and maintain both homes and "chosen" families for themselves Full description.

No Place Like Home: Relationships and Family Life Among Lesbians and Gay Me.

No Place Like Home: Relationships and Family Life Among Lesbians and Gay Men. Article. In this rich, surprising portrait of the world of lesbian and gay relationships, Christopher Carrington unveils the complex and artful ways that gay people create and maintain both homes and "chosen" families for themselves.

Carrington investigates family in the gay and lesbian community.

No Place Like Home : Relationships and Family Life among Lesbians and Gay Men. by Christopher Carrington.

In this rich, surprising portrait of the world of lesbian and gay relationships, Christopher Carrington unveils the complex and artful ways that gay people create and maintain both homes and "chosen" families for themselves."Carefully separating stereotype from reality, Carrington investigates family in the gay and lesbian community. Relying upon interviews and observation, the author analyzes the loves and routings of 52 diverse lesbian, gay, and bisexual couples in the Bay area. . . . [He] closes the work with a discussion of the raging same-sex marriage debate and posits an enlightened solution to this dilemma." —Library Journal

Cashoutmaster
It's a decent book, with some insights into Vietnam that I found interesting. However, the author's relationships with the people of Vietnam seemed somewhat shallow and, in the case of her lover, patronizing.
Flash_back
I bought this book because I had traveled to Vietnam at about the same time the author moved there the first time. I didn't know what to expect from the book, but thought it would bring back my own trip many years ago. Almost from the beginning, I felt like I had traveled to a place I had never been. Sachs's understanding of Vietnam and Vietnamese culture is so deep that I saw Vietnam in a new light. She accurately depicts the changing society in the mid 1990s, as communism gave way to capitalism. Her interpersonal relationships with the friends she made in Hanoi were honest, deep and complicated, not superficial or demeaning. I felt as though I was a bystander in Hanoi because the characters in her memoir are all so vivid. I give her a lot of credit for being so open to living in Vietnam. She never complains about the red-tape or prevalence of bribery in Vietnam, things that often drive foreigners crazy. Even the most open-minded people can become cynical when living in a society where you can't even get an answer from a government official without offering a bribe. She alludes to her frustration with these practices after she returns to live in Hanoi in the mid-90s, but for the most part seems very comfortable just going with the flow. I also enjoyed her discussions about the war and meeting with veterans who had fought against the US. For so long, Americans looked down on Vietnam, but Sachs shows how the Vietnamese took a different approach and looked highly upon Americans, even those who fought in the war. The chapter about John McCain was especially fascinating! I highly recommend this book for anyone who has been to Vietnam, plans to go, or is interested in an American woman's experience living in a foreign culture.
Realistic
I am a high school senior, and as part of our English class we were assigned an ethnography project. For those that do not know ethnography is a process that generates an understanding of another culture or group through an insider’s point of view. The point is to promote cultural exploration through real life sources and interpret why this group does what they do. This memoir is perfect in relation because the topic our group has chosen involves Vietnamese integration and occupational study. By reading this book I have developed another layer of knowledge to better my understanding of life in Vietnam both from the viewpoint as an American as well as through the lens of a Vietnamese citizen. I rated this book 4 stars out of 5, because while it accurately shows the life of an American and the prejudices that ensue, it fails in my mind to completely include all the cultural aspects and interpretations as to why these prejudices are in place, both in America as well as Vietnam. "She's an American, 29 years old, not married yet." "I could clean that for 5 dollars a day, which isn't bad by Vietnamese standards" .These quotes show just how different our cultures are, and this information is ignored for the most part in the memoir. However the book as previously mentioned does an excellent job comparing and contrasting American and Vietnamese culture and provided very useful background information regarding my ethnography project.
Larosa
I have actually had the honor of studying and working with Dr. Carrington. His book did not disappoint one bit. He is a great thinker and I highly recommend this book if you are interested in LGB issues. As a Sociologist, I found this book right up my alley and even if you aren't, you will learn a great deal about relationships from it.
Siralune
I loved "The House on Dream Street." Dana Sachs has given us a delightful inside view of life in a Vietnamese neighborhood. Her immersion into their culture and the way she has related it makes for a most endearing and interesting story.
Munigrinn
Her writing style is so playful, amusing, charming, and sensitive. Her observation of the environment and culture is so acute. She brought alive the scenes, the sounds, the liveliness of Hanoi streets -- just like the classic Vietnamese novels that we had to read while in high school. I bought this book for my wife, previewed it and then finished it. Highly recommended.
Qane
This book was recommended to me and I really enjoyed it - I like reading about different countries and cultures and this book enabled me to get an insight of Vietnam everyday life and how the people of Vietnam live, customs etc. it was interesting for me as a westerner to read of how another westerner lived amongst these lovely people. I was rather sorry when I finished the book. Whet my appetite to visit the country and see for myself even though it would be from a very touristy aspect.
We have been to Vietnam twice, both times to Hanoi. I was, therefore, easily drawn to this story. I found the book to be an honestly written depiction of the author's experience with none of the "glossing over" that I feared. If you have ever dreamed of running off to a foreign land for much more than a vacation, you'll really enjoy this book.