» » No Direction Home: The American Family and the Fear of National Decline, 1968-1980

Download No Direction Home: The American Family and the Fear of National Decline, 1968-1980 fb2

by Natasha Zaretsky
Download No Direction Home: The American Family and the Fear of National Decline, 1968-1980 fb2
Social Sciences
  • Author:
    Natasha Zaretsky
  • ISBN:
    0807830941
  • ISBN13:
    978-0807830949
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    The University of North Carolina Press; New edition edition (April 23, 2007)
  • Pages:
    336 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Social Sciences
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1301 kb
  • ePUB format
    1828 kb
  • DJVU format
    1934 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    327
  • Formats:
    lit lrf doc docx


No Direction Home offers a powerful and richly original analysis of American culture in the 1970s

No Direction Home offers a powerful and richly original analysis of American culture in the 1970s. Natasha Zaretsky's book is a tour de force that marshals sociology, economics, and psychology to explain how Americans, once sure of their destiny, plunged in the 1970s into a profound pessimism not only about their place in the world, but also about the integrity of their own institutions-from the government in Washington to the home and hearth. This pessimism-combining a sense of national peril with a fear of moral and personal decline-gave rise to the Republican realignment of the 1980s and underlay the conservative revival after September 11, 2001.

Between 1968 and 1980, fears about family deterioration and national decline were ubiquitous in American political culture. In No Direction Home, Natasha Zaretsky shows that these perceptions of decline profoundly shaped one another. Throughout the 1970s, anxieties about the future of the nuclear family collided with anxieties about the direction of the United States in Between 1968 and 1980, fears about family deterioration and national decline were ubiquitous in American political culture

Between 1968 and 1980, fears about family deterioration and national decline were ubiquitous in American political culture. Throughout the 1970s, anxieties about the future of the nuclear family collided with anxieties about the direction of the United States in the wake of military defeat in Vietnam and in the midst of economic recession, Zaretsky explains. By exploring such themes as the controversy surrounding prisoners of war in Southeast Asia, the OPEC oil embargo of 1973-74, and debates about cultural narcissism, Zaretsky reveals that the 1970s marked a significant turning point in the history of American nationalism.

No Fear (Original Mix). Traditional Families On The Decline: Fewer Children Grow Up Living With A Mom And A Dad - Продолжительность: 3:51 yazakchattiest Recommended for you. 3:51. 4K Video Ultra HD - Amazing Bird's Eye Views in 4k LoungeV Films - Relaxing Music and Nature Sounds 318 зрителей.

No Direction Home: The American Family and the Fear of National Decline, 1968-1980 Between 1968 and 1980, fears about family deterioration and national decline were ubiquitous in American political culture.

It provides coverage of national news related to academic medicine. A model that assumed the grooves along two rubbing directions is proposed, and the relation between the orientation of the liquid crystal and the relative rubbing strength is analyzed

It provides coverage of national news related to academic medicine. A model that assumed the grooves along two rubbing directions is proposed, and the relation between the orientation of the liquid crystal and the relative rubbing strength is analyzed. We found that this model can explain the observed experimental results. September 2001 · Social Marketing Quarterly.

Between 1968 and 1980, fears about family deterioration and national decline were ubiquitous in. .This work shows that these perceptions of decline profoundly shaped one another. It explores the fears that not only shaped an earlier era but also have reverberated into our own time.

No Direction Home’s overarching argument is that during the 1970s a growing number of Americans interpreted . In each chapter, Zaretsky persuasively demonstrates a substantial gap between public discourse and social realities.

No Direction Home’s overarching argument is that during the 1970s a growing number of Americans interpreted the changes that were taking place in American society through a discourse of decline, paving the way for Ronald Reagan’s triumph in the 1980 presidential election. Many leading political conservatives attributed America’s defeat in Vietnam to a collapse of national will, not to diplomatic, political, tactical, or strategic errors.

Between 1968 and 1980, fears about family deterioration and national decline were ubiquitous in American political culture. In No Direction Home, Natasha Zaretsky shows that these perceptions of decline profoundly shaped one another. Throughout the 1970s, anxieties about the future of the nuclear family collided with anxieties about the direction of the United States in the wake of military defeat in Vietnam and in the midst of economic recession, Zaretsky explains. By exploring such themes as the controversy surrounding prisoners of war in Southeast Asia, the OPEC oil embargo of 1973-74, and debates about cultural narcissism, Zaretsky reveals that the 1970s marked a significant turning point in the history of American nationalism. After Vietnam, a wounded national identity--rooted in a collective sense of injury and fueled by images of family peril--exploded to the surface and helped set the stage for the Reagan Revolution. With an innovative analysis that integrates cultural, intellectual, and political history, No Direction Home explores the fears that not only shaped an earlier era but also have reverberated into our own time.

Tiv
I had to purchase this book for an American Studies course at the University of Massachusetts Boston and it was the best choice for my final paper. Natasha Zaretsky has outlined for us the several ways in which the American family has become the backdrop for American national sympathy especially when at war. The strategy of using the family almost always had a connection with the government and vice versa the connection with the government and the family. If you would like to know more about the 1970's and the issues that surrounded the Vitenam war and the rise of Reagan, I suggest that you read this book.
hardy
Readers should note the blurb by John Judis of The New Republic which appears on the back cover: "Natasha Zaretsky's book is a theoretical tour de force that marshals sociology, economics, and psychology to explain how Americans, once sure of their destiny, plunged in the 1970s into a profound pessimism not only about their place in the world, but about the integrity of their own institutions - from the government in Washington to the home and hearth. This pessimism - combining a sense of national peril and with a fear of moral and personal decline -- gave rise to the Republican realignment of the 1980s and underlay the conservative revival after September 11. Anyone who wants to understand the politics of the last three decades needs to read Zaretsky's startlingly original book."