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by Mark Doty
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Social Sciences
  • Author:
    Mark Doty
  • ISBN:
    0060931973
  • ISBN13:
    978-0060931971
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Harper Perennial; Reprint edition (September 19, 2000)
  • Pages:
    224 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Social Sciences
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1336 kb
  • ePUB format
    1120 kb
  • DJVU format
    1650 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    444
  • Formats:
    lit docx lit docx


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FREE shipping on qualifying offers. In Firebird, Mark Doty tells the story of a ten-year-old in a top hat, cane, and red chiffon scarf. Mark Doty's books of poetry and nonfiction prose have been honored with numerous distinctions, including the National Book Critics Circle Award, the PEN/Martha Albrand Award, the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, and, in the United Kingdom, the T. S. Eliot Prize. In 2008, he won the National Book Award for Fire to Fire: New and Selected Poems.

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Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Firebird presents us with a heroic little boy who has quite enough worries without discovering that his dawning sexuality is the Wrong One. A self-confessed "chubby smart bookish sissy with glasses and a Southern accent," Doty grew up on the move, the family following his father's engineering work across America-from Tennessee to Arizona, Florida to California.

Mark Doty takes his memoir and shapes it into a painting brushing multiple colors and flourishes throughout his life while using many brushes. His memoir is packed with embellishments and edgy situations that occur as he s discovering his homosexuality.

In Firebird, Mark Doty tells the story of a ten-year-old in a top hat, cane, and red chiffon scarf, interrupted while belting out Judy Garland's "Get Happy" by his alarmed mother at the bedroom door, exclaiming, "Son, you're a boy!" Firebird presents us with a heroic little boy who has quite.

In Firebird, Mark Doty tells the story of a ten-year-old in a top hat, cane, and red chiffon scarf, interrupted while belting out Judy Garland's "Get Happy" by his alarmed mother at the bedroom door, exclaiming, "Son, you're a boy!" Firebird presents us with a heroic little boy who has quite enough worries without discovering that his dawning sexuality is the Wrong One. A self-confessed "chubby smart bookish sissy with glasses and a Southern accent," Doty grew up on the move, the family following his father's engineering work across America-from Te. .

Mark Doty is one of America's finest writers of poetry and prose. That such a mind should have triumphed over his stressful growing up years is remarkable. His background would have landed many other kids in a foster home.

Childhood's work is to see what lies beneath, Mark Doty writes in his memoir, Firebird. Mark Doty is one of America's finest writers of poetry and prose.

Book's title: Firebird : a memoir Mark Doty. Library of Congress Control Number: 99015619. Personal Name: Doty, Mark. International Standard Book Number (ISBN): 0060193743. HarperCollins, (c)1999. Physical Description: 200 p. : ill. ;, 25 cm. Personal Name

Mark Doty (born August 10, 1953) is an American poet and memoirist best known for his work My Alexandria. He was the winner of the National Book Award for Poetry in 2008

Mark Doty (born August 10, 1953) is an American poet and memoirist best known for his work My Alexandria. He was the winner of the National Book Award for Poetry in 2008. Mark Doty was born in Maryville, Tennessee to Lawrence and Ruth Doty, with an older sister, Sarah Alice Doty. He earned a Bachelor of Arts from Drake University in Des Moines, Iowa, and received his Master of Fine Arts in creative writing from Goddard College in Plainfield, Vermont.

Mark Doty asks in his beautifully succinct and evocative memoir Doty has won nearly every award possible in the States. He is a notable poet. Some people will reject this book as having nothing to do with them

Mark Doty asks in his beautifully succinct and evocative memoir. At one time memoirs were the preserve of ambassadors, generals and people who had lived lives of public note. By now, the memoir has been appropriated by anyone with a story to tell. Doty has won nearly every award possible in the States. Some people will reject this book as having nothing to do with them. Yet as Doty points out: "What you don't allow yourself to know controls and determines. It is a subtle portrait of the nuclear family under stress as much as a portrait of an emerging, perceptive self. What matters," he writes, "is what we learn to make of what happens to u.

In Firebird, Mark Doty tells the story of a ten-year-old in a top hat, cane, and red chiffon scarf, interrupted while belting out Judy Garland's "Get Happy" by his alarmed mother at the bedroom door, exclaiming, "Son, you're a boy!"

Firebird presents us with a heroic little boy who has quite enough worries without discovering that his dawning sexuality is the Wrong One. A self-confessed "chubby smart bookish sissy with glasses and a Southern accent," Doty grew up on the move, the family following his father's engineering work across America-from Tennessee to Arizona, Florida to California. A lyrical, heartbreaking comedy of one family's dissolution through the corrosive powers of alcohol, sorrow, and thwarted desire, Firebird is also a wry evocation of childhood's pleasures and terrors, a comic tour of American suburban life, and a testament to the transformative power of art.


FLIDER
To the outside world, the four members of Doty’s middle-class family could be in a sitcom of the time period: the father is an engineer, the mother looks respectable, the older sister is popular, and the little boy is bespectacled and bookish. But all is not as it seems. Alcohol wreaks its slow destruction on the family.

But most crucial to Doty’s identity is a difference that occurs even before the disintegration does. The little boy, Doty himself, gradually comes to realize he is gay, and there is no place for being gay in the world in which he grows up.

Because this book was written by a poet, the language is rich and evocative. I love the little boy at the heart of the book.

Here is one important thing I learned from reading Firebird:

Doty begins his memoir with a “Prelude” (so termed because of the use of music and art in the book) which is a beautiful essay in its own right and introduces the reader to a way of viewing a memoir. This essay is about a work of art from the 17th century by the Dutch painter Samuel Von Hoogstraten. It’s called Perspective Box with Views of a Dutch Interior.

This perspective box contains the miniature furnishings of a miniature room which are distorted and misshapen; however, when you look through holes designed for viewing, suddenly the room comes into perfect perspective. Interesting way of viewing memoir itself . . . .

The metaphor of the work of art for memoir and the detailed description both serve as an inspiration to write with detailed accuracy and imagination.
Thozius
Best memoir I have read. His command of the language and blunt honesty about himself are unforgettable.
Malaunitly
Amazing, insightful, inspired -- I connect with this book deeply even though I am not a gay boy growing up in the South. Artists, misfits, anyone who has felt marginalized or just "odd" -- read this. Doty is a writer who changes your life. (His Still Life with Oysters and Lemon is a revelation, a must-read.)
Ricep
A great read from the first to last page.
რฉςh
I read (and met) Mark Doty while I was in college. On the grass at Sarah Lawrence, I memorized his sad, beautiful poetry and read and re-read his book, Heaven's Coast, chronicling his life with his partner dying from AIDS. So, I was very excited when Firebird was chosen by my book club. Again, I found myself amazed and delighted by Mark Doty's use of imagery, but I was also disappointed as the book leapt from experience to experience without explanation. Maybe this is why I never felt "inside" his character, and at the end, was left feeling as though the chapters were more like poems, mysterious pieces of his life that were without resolution. Mark Doty is a man of great accomplishment, a poet of unquestionable talent, but after this book, he's still a mystery to me.
Error parents
Outstanding writer . . . brilliant poet as well.
Amerikan_Volga
Another gem from Mark Doty -- not an essay or a novel or a collection of poetry, but this time a memoir about his childhood. It is as eloquent and engaging as you would expect.
As you read Mark Doty's memoir, you may wish you could reach back though the decades to the 1950's to let this sensitive, awkward, and talented gay boy know that he would some day find himself. Knowing you can't reach back, you watch the story unfold on its own and almost hold your breath lest he succumb to the stifling forces of that era.

Doty is the son of an artistic mother--who was also a tragic alcoholic--and an engineer father who moved the family often from job to job. Doty was often lonely and ostracized and filled with shame that he was somehow different. In that cultural milieu--before the internet and media exposure that we now take for granted--there was almost no context for an emerging gay identity. And Doty clearly suffered from that drought. He was always trying to find and sustain himself in this arid landscape.

What saved him was art. Throughout his childhood, just enough light and air was able to penetrate through art to keep him alive, starting with his mother's artistic pursuits, and continuing with the encouragement of a charismatic elementary school teacher, Miss Tynes, and, later, the mentoring of a poet, Richard Shelton, who taught at a university.

This is not to say that his survival was a foregone conclusion. Doty endured a suicide attempt and an apparent assault by his mother who once pointed a gun at him but could not remove the safety to get it to fire. Still, it is a testament to the tenacity of the human spirit that he could turn these encounters with art into a lifeline.

Toward the end of this memoir, we know that Doty has emerged on the other side, but not without collateral damage. He invested nine years in a marriage to a woman before he was willing to pursue his gay identify. He recalls a visit with his father and new stepmother (his own mother had died of alcoholism) and his then partner, Paul. While we're happy for his emergence, we know it comes with an imperfect combustion. He and his father will never be really close. His mother's half love and half loathing for him and her gruesome death cannot be undone. Like all adult stories, it is a partial victory, but one we can celebrate nonetheless.

If you are ever called to reach back in time for a self that was struggling to emerge, you will be richly rewarded by reading Doty's memoir.