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by Tayannah Lee McQuillar
Download Rootwork: Using the Folk Magick of Black America for Love, Money and Success fb2
Social Sciences
  • Author:
    Tayannah Lee McQuillar
  • ISBN:
    0743235347
  • ISBN13:
    978-0743235341
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Touchstone; First Printing edition (February 4, 2003)
  • Pages:
    160 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Social Sciences
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1584 kb
  • ePUB format
    1859 kb
  • DJVU format
    1574 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    294
  • Formats:
    mbr txt docx lrf


In this groundbreaking book that places Rootwork in its rightful spot among other magickal traditions, Tayannah Lee McQuillar offers a fun and practical guide to improving your life with the help of African American folk magick.

In this groundbreaking book that places Rootwork in its rightful spot among other magickal traditions, Tayannah Lee McQuillar offers a fun and practical guide to improving your life with the help of African American folk magick. Rootwork begins with the basics, from explanations about the magickal powers of the four elements (air, earth, fire, and water) to instructions on creating talismans, charms, and mojo bags. Tayannah Lee McQuillar.

In this groundbreaking book that places Rootwork in its rightful spot among other magickal traditions, Tayannah Lee McQuillar offers a fun and practical guide to improving your life with the help of African American folk magick

In this groundbreaking book that places Rootwork in its rightful spot among other magickal traditions, Tayannah Lee McQuillar offers a fun and practical guide to improving your life with the help of African American folk magick. Rootwork begins with the basics, from explanations about the magickal powers of the four elements (air, earth, fire, and water) to instructions on creating talismans, charms, and mojo bags

In this groundbreaking book that places Rootwork in its rightful spot among other magickal traditions, Tayannah Lee McQuillar offers a fun and practical guide to improving your life with the help of African American folk magick

In this groundbreaking book that places Rootwork in its rightful spot among other magickal traditions, Tayannah Lee McQuillar offers a fun and practical guide to improving your life with the help of African American folk magick. Also included are spells to help you: find your soul mate.

Rootwork - Tayannah Lee McQuillar.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Rootwork - Tayannah Lee McQuillar. Praise for ROOTWORK: It is both refreshing and commendable to witness the restoration of these powerful ancestral traditions by the Afro-diaspora. More importantly, McQuillar clarifies the distinction between Hoodoo, the magio-botanical arts, and Vodoun, the ancestral and deific religion. mamaissii vivian dansi hounon, mami wata & arara vodoun priestess president of mami wata healing society of north america, inc.

Rootwork: Using the Folk. has been added to your Cart. Tayannah Lee McQuillar studied anthropology at the City University of New York and has studied the magio-religious practices of Black America. She lives in New York City. Visit her at ww. ayannahmcquillar.

In this groundbreaking book that places Rootwork in its rightful spot among other magickal traditions, Tayannah. What is Kobo Super Points? A loyalty program that rewards you for your love of reading. Explore rewards Explore Kobo VIP Membership.

Original Products Botanica is the premier source for all your Spiritual, Santeria, Botanica & Occult products. Rootwork: Using the Folk Magick of Black America for Love, Money and Success. Oracle Deck Tarot Tarot Cards.

In this groundbreaking book that places Rootwork in its rightful spot among other magickal traditions, Tayannah Lee McQuillar offers a fun and practical guide to improving your life with the help of African American folk magick. Rootwork begins with the basics, from explanations about the magickal powers of the four elements (air, earth, fire, and water) to instructions on creating talismans, charms, and mojo bags. Also included are spells to help you: find your soul mate spice up your sex life get a new job improve your health discover your inner muse Accessible and easy to use, Rootwork offers the insights of a time-honored tradition as a means of self-empowerment and spiritual growth.

Steelcaster
This book has become a gem among my spiritual library! I've dabbled a little in Hoodoo before reading this, but desired to know more. I was not disappointed. It is a very easy read, getting straight to the point of everything. Not wordy at all! It took me two days to read, and I feel comfortable with expanding my skills with the knowledge I have gained from this book. So thankful!
JOGETIME
I am no longer attending "church" as was looking what our ancestors use to practice and I came across Hoodoo. There's not many books or guides on Hoodoo as there is with Voodoo. This is an excellent guide to have as your foundation. Straightforward and not boring and easy to reference.
Erthai
Everything was simply laid out and straight to the point. I love that the author wrote from personal experiences and personal information. Yes, some of the spells may be on google, but I preferred them coming from someone who knows the practices instead of taking credit for work they know nothing about.
Lesesshe
Like all books, I feel like they should be a starting point. And McQuillar does an amazing job of giving a great overview of rootwork and it's history. And the spells and recipes that she lay are well explained.
Shalinrad
OMG!!!!!!!
I love this book. It only took me 2 days to read it and it has some simple rootwork spells that you can do and most of the ingredients are not that hard to find. Love love love this book!!!!!!!!
DEAD-SHOT
Ms. McQuillar did an amazing job writing this book. It has very valuable and helpful information.
TheFresh
Far too often the very mention of the word hoodoo or voodoo conjures up grotesque images of half-dead grayish people stumbling around mumbling. Finally, here's a book that tells it how it is, that African American hoodoo is nothing more than a form of shamanism. In this simple little, plain speech book, the author explains how the tradition came about and what just about caused its extinction.

Like the author, I was born and raised in urban North America and I was told this practice was called Rootwork. When I talked to people in Chicago and other Midwestern states they called it Rootwork as well. And, I remembered hearing when I was a youngster on the old AM radio dial in between church broadcasting, the late Reverend Ike advertisement, in which someone says, "Somebody people a root on me!" So, Rootwork is what we called hoodoo.

Anyway, I like this book mainly because it focuses upon the core understandings of the tradition. Most authors that claim to write about this subject simply copy formulas and recipes from older books and sell it as their own, because they have no familiarity with African American culture. As a result, for instance these authors would copy a recipe that has raccoon penis in it and have people going around looking for a raccoon to cut off its genitalia. This is how animals and other things in nature become extinct if one looks at history. These authors that write from this perspective also do our tradition a disservice by making practitioners appear to be inhumane.

In truth, it is only when it is understood that raccoons were one of the animals that was hunted in the African American community that it begins to make sense why and how the raccoons' genitals were used. It was simple, because every part of the animal was used, after skinning the animal, not having anything else to do with the genitals it was made into a charm and the rest of the animal was used for meat, because this pesky rodent tastes like roast beef. I am not sure if it tastes like jutia (the Cuban rodent) but one could sure see the cultural similarities. By the way, this same practice is done for turtles and is also exist in other Afro-Diaspora traditions. People don't just kill animals for a magickal bone, that's pure fictional nonsense! Animals for the most part have always been killed for food and like most people that live close to nature. The remaining parts (bones, skins, etc.) are used for spiritual/magical practices.

So, this is why I liked this book, because the author gives enough clues and hints for people to make their own substitution, without dishonoring and discrediting the tradition of old.
This book is absolutely fabulous.. An straight to the point about Hoodoo and it's practice.. I needed this book an often referre back to this book.. I'm in love.. The auther is truly amazing..