» » Coming Apart: The State of White America, 1960-2010

Download Coming Apart: The State of White America, 1960-2010 fb2

by Traber Burns,Charles Murray
Download Coming Apart: The State of White America, 1960-2010 fb2
Social Sciences
  • Author:
    Traber Burns,Charles Murray
  • ISBN:
    1455161799
  • ISBN13:
    978-1455161799
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Blackstone Audio Inc; Unabridged edition (June 1, 2012)
  • Subcategory:
    Social Sciences
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1166 kb
  • ePUB format
    1434 kb
  • DJVU format
    1561 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    284
  • Formats:
    txt mbr lrf rtf


Start by marking Coming Apart: The State of White America, 1960-2010 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. In Coming Apart, Charles Murray explores the formation of American classes that are different in kind from anything we have ever known, focusing on whites as a way of driving home the fact From the bestselling author of Losing Ground and The Bell Curve, this startling long-lens view shows how America is coming apart at the seams that historically have joined our. classes.

Coming Apart - an acclaimed bestseller that explains why white America has become fractured and divided in. -Roger Lowenstein, Bloomberg Businessweek.

Coming Apart - an acclaimed bestseller that explains why white America has become fractured and divided in education and class.

Charles Murray, Coming Apart: The State of White America, 1960-2010 (2012). Murray largely discounts the larger structural changes in the economy as contributing to the fate of the lower class and their retreat from the "founding virtues. New York, NY: Crown Forum.

In Coming Apart, Charles Murray explores the formation of American classes that are different in kind from anything we have ever known . The evidence in Coming Apart is about white America. Its message is about all of America

In Coming Apart, Charles Murray explores the formation of American classes that are different in kind from anything we have ever known, focusing on whites as a way of driving home the fact that the trends he describes do not break along lines of race or ethnicity. Its message is about all of America. A timely investigation into a worsening class divide no one can afford to ignore. In Coming Apart, Charles Murray explores the formation of American classes that are different in kind from anything we have ever known, focusing on whites as a way of driving home the fact that the trends he describes do not break along lines of race or ethnicity

Coming Apart - an acclaimed bestseller that explains why white America has become fractured and divided in education and . In Coming Apart, Charles Murray explores the formation of American classes that are different in kind from anything we have ever known, focusing on whites as a way of driving home the fact that the trends he describes do not break along lines of race or ethnicity.

Coming Apart explores an evolution in American society that has taken place over the past 50 years, leading to the formation of. .I'll be shocked if there's another book this year as important as Charles Murray's 'Coming Apart.

Coming Apart explores an evolution in American society that has taken place over the past 50 years, leading to the formation of American classes that are different in kind and in their degree of separation from anything we have ever known. In a stunning rebuke of feel good social science such as The Social Animal and Stumbling on Happiness, Coming Apart argues that where you come from correlates strongly with how you will achieve.

In Coming Apart, Charles Murray explores the formation of American classes that are different in kind from anything we have ever .

In Coming Apart, Charles Murray explores the formation of American classes that are different in kind from anything we have ever known, focusing on whites as a way of driving home the fact that the trends he describes do not break along lines of race or ethnicity. The top and bottom of white America increasingly live in different cultures, Murray argues, with the powerful upper class living in enclaves surrounded by their own kind, ignorant about life in mainstream America, and the lower class suffering from erosions of family and community life that strike at the heart of the pursuit of happiness. This divergence puts the success of the American project at risk.

The evidence in Coming Apart is about white America.

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Charles Murray explores the formation of new American classes that are different in kind from anything we have ever known, focusing on whites to drive home the fact that the trends he describes do not break along lines of race or ethnicity. Drawing on five decades of research, Coming Apart demonstrates that the new upper and lower classes have diverged so far in core behaviors and values that they barely recognize their underlying American kinshipa divergence that has nothing to do with income inequality and that has grown during good economic times and bad. The two classes live in increasingly different cultures, with the powerful upper class surrounded by their own kind, ignorant about life in mainstream America, and the lower class suffering from erosions of family and community life that strike at the heart of the pursuit of happiness. The evidence is about white America. The message is about all of America.

GWEZJ
Charles Murray provides a data-driven report on how white America’s changing faithfulness to what he calls the United States’ four founding virtues: Religiosity, Marriage, Industriousness and Honesty, has changed the fabric of American society since 1960.

Having read this book over a period of a few weeks on either side of the 2016 presidential election that has brought Donald Trump within six weeks (as of this review) of the Oval Office, I saw how anyone with Murray’s perspective could have predicted how the vote would be split along lines of geography, education, and income. “Coming Apart” remains a highly relevant read to those with the patience to work through some fairly dense material about why America is what it is today.

Murray views the four founding virtues mentioned above as the basis of “American exceptionalism,” a phrase he uses to summarize how America is different from (not necessarily better than) any other country. That said, Murray’s veneration of the four founding virtues and their role in the success of the American experiment over many generations – is clear. So too, is his fear of America ending its experiment with a government that allows people to define and pursue their own happiness, rather than defining it for them. That, in Murray's view, would result in the United States becoming unexceptional among nations.

The book is not for someone in search of a canned ideology or a casual read. Murray marshals much sociological data, and observations of 19th-century sociologists about how Americans used to be, in support of his conclusions and prognosis for whether the American Experiment can continue. Readers will need to focus to absorb it.

Murray’s thesis regarding the American educational system as a people-sorting mechanism that helps to self-perpetuate a new stratification of citizens into the current elite class, is cogent and fascinating. Add data showing that smart, well-educated kids come from smart, well-educated parents, and you have the rise of new American ruling families. They are a scant percentage of our total population. They lead us yet they have, in many ways, lost touch with us. Murray offers a somewhat amusing, yet thought-provoking quiz to help you understand how much you have in common with the elites who have isolated themselves, in many ways, from the other 98% of Americans.

Murray’s analysis of what has happened to working-class white America’s adherence to the four founding virtues from 1960-2010, is sobering. And, Murray sees the subtle abandonment of these principles among the new elite class as well; an abandonment of commitment if not yet in behavior.

The final chapter contains a critique of socialist (European-style) democracy that, while worded kindly, contains powerful insights as to why such a system, however well-meaning, would represent a serious blow to the United States’ status as a place that promotes the pursuit of happiness. Those who are just interested in getting an overview of Murray’s thought, might skip ahead to read this chapter.

The author brightens his prognosis for America by recalling the American tradition of rising to the difficult occasion. He awaits a new, secular “Great Awakening.” This makes me consider millennials, and their well-chronicled focus on serving others and seeking out meaningful lives. Perhaps America’s greatest hope to retain its exceptionalism – no, make that its distinctiveness among the nations – are the children and grandchildren of my generation who may find their meaning and call to service within the framework of the institutions of religion, family, vocation and fair play that the Founding Fathers had in mind. Some will find that formula trite; Murray might say that those people are making his point about abandonment of the four founding virtues, for him.
Gavirus
Charles Murray uses substantial, scientifically valid data to affirm the changes that have occurred in the American society over the past 50 years. When he details the increase in unwed mothers in the lower classes and why it has increased it seems so simple to understand. It is like a "that makes sense" moment. He does the same for honesty, integrity, work ethic, industriousness, religion, etc. This is a solid book that is not easy to read in the sense that information is powerful and requires your full attention in order to comprehend the material and you definitely will want to comprehend. It can get tedious in some parts but you have to understand all parts in order to appreciate the final chapters in which he projects the potential paths we may travel as our welfare state starts to implode. I was trained as a scientist and love authors who can explain social change with hard data. Murray does this amazingly well. This book is worth reading twice.
Cargahibe
Charles Murray, in this book prophetically described the fissure in American society between the Elites, based primarily on the Coasts, and working class White America which has now been politically expressed in Donald Trump's political movement of the alienated, bringing him successfulpy to the White House. Murray's book is a sociological study and not a political one, but he warns how these two groups of Americans have grown apart so that they have almost no contact nor understanding between them. Whereas in the past, conscription brought different groups of Americans together in military service, today people in these groups live separate lives. In addition, whereas in the past, working class whites with just a high school education were able to get good paying jobs like the automotive and steel industries, for example, jobs of that type have largely disappeared, leaving this group frustrated and unable to get ahead in the world as their parents did. This has lead to breakdown in family life and unfortunately high levels of drug abuse, alcoholism, poor health and large numbers of children growing up in broken homes with inadequate parental guidance from two parents. The result is the rapid growth of a white underclass of people locked into a cycle of poverty and hopelessness. The black community has suffered for many years from this situation, but now a large group of whites are now suffering the same thing.
As I said, Murray's book is a sociological study, but the political ramifications we are just beginning to see now, with the rise of Donald Trump to the Presidency.
It is unfortunate for Hillary Clinton and President Obama that they apparently aren't aware of the facts that Murray spells out in the book because if they had, they would have understood better the anger and frustration of so many white people whose parents lived in an optimistic world of American promise, but whose children have seen that promise evaporate.