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by Moira Ferguson
Download The History of Mary Prince, A West Indian Slave, Related by Herself fb2
Social Sciences
  • Author:
    Moira Ferguson
  • ISBN:
    0472082469
  • ISBN13:
    978-0472082469
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    University of Michigan Press (August 1, 1993)
  • Pages:
    144 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Social Sciences
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1310 kb
  • ePUB format
    1305 kb
  • DJVU format
    1960 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    550
  • Formats:
    mobi docx azw lrf


Mary Prince was the first black British woman to escape from slavery and publish a record of her experiences

Mary Prince was the first black British woman to escape from slavery and publish a record of her experiences.

Mary Prince's history triggered a lawsuit and countersuit when it was published in 1831. It was instantly in great demand by the public and was of great value to the Anti-Slavery Society in their campaign against the slave trade. I recommend this book both as a classic of Black history and an unforgettable story. 10 people found this helpful.

Mary Prince was the first black British woman to escape from slavery and publish a record of her experiences. In this unique document, Mary Prince vividly recalls her life as a slave in Bermuda, Turks Island, Antigua, and England, her rebellion against physical and psychological degradation, and her eventual escape to London in 1828. First published in London and Edinburgh Mary Prince was the first black British woman to escape from slavery and publish a record of her experiences.

In early 1831, a particular conjunction of people and events encouraged and enabled Thomas Pringle, the Secretary of the Anti-Slavery Society in Britain, to publish on his own undertaking The History of Mary Prince, a West Indian Slave, Related by Herself, generally remembered today a. .

In early 1831, a particular conjunction of people and events encouraged and enabled Thomas Pringle, the Secretary of the Anti-Slavery Society in Britain, to publish on his own undertaking The History of Mary Prince, a West Indian Slave, Related by Herself, generally remembered today as the only slave narrative of a West Indian woman.

The book has found popularity both in the classroom and with the general public

The book has found popularity both in the classroom and with the general public. Recently, an adaptation of the memoirs of Mary Prince appeared as one segment of "A Skirt Through History," a six-part feature film series produced by the BBC. Mary Prince's story has also been the centerpiece of BBC radio broadcasts.

Home Browse Books Book details, The History of Mary Prince, a.

Home Browse Books Book details, The History of Mary Prince, a West Indian Slave:. The History of Mary Prince, a West Indian Slave: Related by Herself. Mary Prince's narrative was one of the earliest to reveal the ugly truths about slavery in the West Indies to an English reading public that was largely unaware of its atrocities. Prince was born in Bermuda to an enslaved family. While eighteenth-century slave narratives largely focused on Christian spiritual journeys and religious redemption, Prince was part of a growing trend of abolitionist writers focused on the injustice of slavery.

My mother was a household slave in the same family. His wife was herself much afraid of him; and, during his stay at home, seldom dared to shew her usual kindness to the slaves. I was under her own care, and my little brothers and sisters were my play-fellows and companions. He often left her, in the most distressed circumstances, to reside in other female society, at some place in the West Indies of which I have forgot the name. My poor mistress bore his ill-treatment with great patience, and all her slaves loved and pitied her. I was truly attached to her, and, next to my own mother, loved her better than any creature in the world.

Book Description: Mary Prince's narrative was one of the earliest to reveal the ugly truths about slavery in the West Indies .

Book Description: Mary Prince's narrative was one of the earliest to reveal the ugly truths about slavery in the West Indies to an English reading public that was largely unaware of its atrocities. She spent her early life in harsh conditions and was eventually sold to John Adams Wood of Antigua, working as his domestic servant. She joined the Moravian Church, where she learned to read, and married Daniel James, a former slave who had bought his freedom.

She wished it to be done, she said, that good people in England might hear from a slave what a slave had felt and suffered; and a letter of her late master's, which will be found in the Supplement, induced me to accede to her wish without farther delay. The more immediate object of the publication will afterwards appear. The narrative was taken down from Mary's own lips by a lady who happened to be at the time residing in my family as a visitor.

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The autobiography of Mary Prince, a black woman who escaped slavery in the West Indies

Silly Dog
Mary Prince dictated her history to a white woman in England, where she finally claimed her freedom after a life of horrendous abuse under several masters.

Her narration is part of an anti-slavery pamphlet that contains other fascinating documents as well: a letter from her last master viciously defaming her character and a presentation of evidence to refute this calumny by Thomas Pringle, Secretary of Britain's Anti-Slavery Society.

Among other events, Mary's history includes daily beatings by sadistic masters who, while entrusting her with considerable responsibility, punished the tiniest fault with insane cruelty. It describes her ten-year stint working long hours in the salt ponds of Turk's Island, labor that broke her health. It shows her growing attraction to religion and her attempts to receive spiritual instruction.

I found this book compelling on two levels: as a detailed personal account of the appalling oppression of black slaves in the West Indies - and as a look at the compassionate work of anti-slavery activists. Those who opposed slavery had to have their wits about them, for the slave owners were greatly debased by their unholy power over other humans and would stoop to any chicanery to defend their position.

Mary Prince's history triggered a lawsuit and countersuit when it was published in 1831. It was instantly in great demand by the public and was of great value to the Anti-Slavery Society in their campaign against the slave trade.

I recommend this book both as a classic of Black history and an unforgettable story.
Llbery
This is an excellent memoir, albiet painful to read in certain parts. This is a must-read for history buffs--particularly those interested in the Caribbean and the system of slavery in the British colonies.
Purestone
This book is a great primary source read that gives an in-depth image of the life of Mary Prince. From the transporting between colonies and England, to the violence endured, and being passed from family to family - Mary Prince remains hopeful of her situation and also for her future as a wife. The book directly engages the reader and provides not only information about the life of a Black female slave, but also humanizes Mary as a woman rather than just a slave as many accounts and even history tends to classify them as.
Shalizel
As described
Brialelis
Had to read this for a college coarse. It was a good and well written book. Opened my eyes to the slave trade more.
Gunos
The story was great, but it's unfortunate that Mary Prince was not able to speak her true voice throughout.
Frostdefender
This story should be mandatory for high school students (or even Jr High). First person true story of a slave.
I'm reading this with my 12-year old daughter, and we both are really enjoying it -- if "enjoying" can be applied to the context of witnessing through literature the torture and enslavement of human beings as their oppressors smugly walk around with absolutely no accountability for their heinous deeds. My daughter chose to read this book in her free time today. It is very engrossing.

The first part of this book is about the life of Mary Price. The second is what happens when an abolitionist in England champions her cause, and how returning home as a free woman to her husband is made impossible by her vindictive "master." The final section is the firsthand account of a boy in Africa kidnapped into slavery and what happens to him after his ship is blown to England instead of to his intended destination.

I highly recommend this book in general. I would also recommend it other parents wanting to help educate their middle schooler about the history of the enslavement of African peoples by the West. The stories are too disturbing for elementary school children, and the vocabulary would be too advanced.