» » West of Kabul, East of New York: An Afghan American Story

Download West of Kabul, East of New York: An Afghan American Story fb2

by Tamim Ansary
Download West of Kabul, East of New York: An Afghan American Story fb2
Social Sciences
  • Author:
    Tamim Ansary
  • ISBN:
    0312421516
  • ISBN13:
    978-0312421519
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Picador; First edition (March 1, 2003)
  • Pages:
    304 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Social Sciences
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1668 kb
  • ePUB format
    1584 kb
  • DJVU format
    1918 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    469
  • Formats:
    lit rtf lrf txt


Tamim Ansary does what many authors do, and starts with an action packed turning point in his story, in this . As I reached the end of West of Kabul, East of New York, I found myself thinking back to the first discussion we had about this book in class

Tamim Ansary does what many authors do, and starts with an action packed turning point in his story, in this case an event that every American and most of the world have an intimate to good amount of knowledge of. This is incredibly effective, as it instantly draws the readers in as events begin to unfold. As I reached the end of West of Kabul, East of New York, I found myself thinking back to the first discussion we had about this book in class.

There are many lives now in our melted world as complicated as Tamim Ansary's. The wonder is that this son of Afghanistan and America moves between the competing pronouns of his life with a graceful pen; he is never less than curious and generous toward the various chapters of his life that claim him. ―Richard Rodriguez, author of Days of Obligations.

Mir Tamim Ansary (born November 4, 1948, in Kabul, Afghanistan) is an Afghan-American author and public speaker. He is the author of Destiny Disrupted: A History of the World Through Islamic Eyes, West of Kabul, East of New York, and other books concerning Afghan and Muslim history. Ansary was born in Kabul and lived there until high school when he moved to the United States. He attended Reed College in Portland, Oregon.

The son of an Afghan man and the first American woman to live as an Afghan, Ansary grew up in the intimate world . Tamim Ansary has emerged as one of the most eloquent voices on the conflict between Islam and the West.

The son of an Afghan man and the first American woman to live as an Afghan, Ansary grew up in the intimate world of Afghan family life, one never seen by outsiders. No sooner had he emigrated to San Francisco than he was drawn into the community of Afghan expatriates sustained by the dream of returning to their country -and then drawn back to the Islamic world himself to discover the nascent phenomenon of militant religious fundamentalism.

Tamim Ansary's book is a must read for anyone who has even a passing interest in Afghans and Afghanistan. Because what they will discover between the covers is different from most what has been written about Afghanistan since the events of Sept. Tamim Ansary's memoir hails back to an Afghanistan most people have forgotten, one I personally remember fondly, an Afghanistan living in peaceful anonymity, a "lost world" of walled villages, extended family networks, a world where instead of television, "we had genealogy. His prose is rich with the sounds and smells of this old world, but it transcends mere nostalgia.

Tamim Ansary has emerged as one of the most eloquent voices on the conflict between Islam and the West. West of Kabul, East of New York: An Afghan American Story, proves that the e-mail wasn't a fluke. Ansary possesses a rare talent for clearly delineating complicated philosophical and political questions. His prose is subtle and addictive.

Exploring further with the Afghan American who wrote the famous .

Tamim Ansary was born in 1948 in Kabul; his father was an Afghan, his mother an American. His first 16 years were spent in prewar Afghanistan, where he was raised in a close-knit extended family. Ansary left Afghanistan in 1964, along with his mother and siblings, to study in America. But it turned out to be only the beginning of a life spent at the crossroads between the traditional Islamic society of his youth and the secular Western culture he came to call his home.

Ansary is an Afghan-American columnist and writer who lived in America after finishing high school. His most famous book was West of Kabul, East of New York.

Home Afghanistan Literature & Fiction West of Kabul, East of New York . Tamim Ansary has emerged as one of the most eloquent voices on th. .

Home Afghanistan Literature & Fiction West of Kabul, East of New York: An Afghan Story. The son of an Afghan man and the first American woman to live as an Afghan, Ansary grew up in the intimate world of Afghan family life, one never seen by outsiders.

A passionate personal journey through two cultures in conflict

Shortly after militant Islamic terrorists destroyed the World Trade Center, Tamim Ansary of San Francisco sent an e-mail to twenty friends, telling how the threatened U.S. reprisals against Afghanistan looked to him as an Afghan American. The message spread, and in a few days it had reached, and affected, millions of people-Afghans and Americans, soldiers and pacifists, conservative Christians and talk-show hosts; for the message, written in twenty minutes, was one Ansary had been writing all his life.

West of Kabul, East of New York is an urgent communiqué by an American with "an Afghan soul still inside me," who has lived in the very different worlds of Islam and the secular West. The son of an Afghan man and the first American woman to live as an Afghan, Ansary grew up in the intimate world of Afghan family life, one never seen by outsiders. No sooner had he emigrated to San Francisco than he was drawn into the community of Afghan expatriates sustained by the dream of returning to their country -and then drawn back to the Islamic world himself to discover the nascent phenomenon of militant religious fundamentalism.

Tamim Ansary has emerged as one of the most eloquent voices on the conflict between Islam and the West. His book is a deeply personal account of the struggle to reconcile two great civilizations and to find some point in the imagination where they might meet.


Darkraven
The author writes in a very straighforward style. I can't decide whether this is an asset. Very good for high schoolers or those just starting college. Not quite so much so for adults.

Basically shortly after the memoir begins , we see the author as a hippie college student-- a young adult living in San Francisco. His life is proliferated. Afghan Father, American Mother, upper class in Afghanistan, schooled in English as well as other languages, growing into his teen years in Afghanistan in a semi- cloistered environment. Then, he comes to live in America at age sixteen! Because he has one foot in Afghanistan and one in America, he feels conflcted, although he desperately wants to be an American kid.

Factor in the 1960s ethos, the exaggerated hippie lifestyle in San Francisco at his time, the excellent but "do it yourself" college he attended. Then add his close extended family here and abroad and combine this with outside muslim pressures.

The above is a recipe for his search to "find" himself. The book is about this journey-- rejecting extreme religiosity which is fomenting abroad, willingly losing his Afghan family (and roots) and coming to terms with this while achieving happiness, success and constructing a new family here as he matures.

Some of the best parts of Ansary's story detail the complete honesty of his feelings toward his very close original family particularly his Father, who stayed in Afghanistan. He is unapologetic about his rejection of his place of birth, the obvious all-consuming religion and culture of worship. He ultimately embraces his American life wholeheartedly.

This is powerful, simple in some ways, a quick read that reminds us that people are individuals first.
Marr
I enjoyed reading this book, which I chose foe an English project in high school. Ansary provides an interesting and insightful look into what Afghani life was life before the country was modernized. This biography takes you through the stages in which some in the Islamic world became radicalized and exactly why it happened. This information provides some good insight about how the current conflicts of today began and what has been attempted to prevent them. Reading the path of his life was an engaging experience, making you sometimes laugh or feel really sorry for him as he goes through his life blindly in a way. Looking back he provides insight about whether he thought his choices were good or bad, but he has had a very interesting life relevant to today's society.
Iell
An enjoyable and yet poignant account of growing up Afghan and American. Mr. Ansary's descriptions of living as a child within the US-sponsored Helmand Valley Authority capture the ambiguities of America's desire to help and remake the world, while the account of his adult travels in search of his Islamic heritage reveal how difficult (impossible?) it is to truly connect with a world that existed 1400 years ago. (Think about those individuals who believe we can somehow return to the "original" meanings of the Constitution.) I'm writing this from Afghanistan, where I regularly ask my Afghan friends about the correct way to pray, particularly the requirement (described in the book) to extend the little finger while the rest are closed. This question is always good for some laughs, and has led to the following observation from them: Look, life is tough in Afghanistan, and the individual may be a practicing Muslim who doesn't like Americans, but the reality is survival: no one cares about ideology or religion, it's whatever we have to do to live. That explained my question about the secret policemen who had entered service under the communists, supported the Russians, worked for the Taliban, and now served the Karzai regime. Afghanistan will somehow survive, not as an American clone but as itself. This book is a good introduction to comprehending this world. My only question (piqued by a recent article in the Washington Post) is whether (or how) he remained friends with his siblings: an older sister who embraced America and a younger brother who sought meaning in a fundamentalist version of Islam.
Mightsinger
This is a great book that I highly recommend to anyone with an open mind and curious spirit. I read it for my AP History class and despite all of the notes I had to take and papers I had to write, I thoroughly enjoyed it (I actually enjoyed exploring some subjects he wrote about in several of my papers)!
Thoginn
An interesting insight into the life of an afghan native who is now a United States Citizen. This will give one a feeling of what life in the East is like versus life in the west aka; a Christian perspective versus an Islamic upbringing. Very enlightening. This is not a proselytizing work, but helps one to understand what life in the East and growing up as a Muslim was and is like. This does help one to understand that All Muslims are not Bad and out to destroy anyone who disagrees with their beliefs..
Fonceiah
Published in 2002 but still in 2013 remains engrossing and highly informative about recent and contemporary Afghanistan and about author Tamim Ansary's childhood life there and his subsequent ongoing interaction with the land of his birth (Afghanistan) from the land of his birthright citizenship (United States). Ansary is a gifted writer. The journey through the book goes quickly. Be prepared for this account to seize you and not let go until the last page.
Meztihn
Any book or film that provides me with new and compelling perspective on something that matters is well worth my time. This memoir by Tamim Ansary does that, and he's a talented writer to boot! The changes in Afghanistan in Ansary's lifetime are remarkable. Some of my favorite sections include his travel back to the Middle East and the people he meets along the way. His description of the way the events of 9-11 affected him and spurred him to action opened some new avenues of thought for me. I have selected this book as part of summer reading for my high school seniors this year.