Download Sight Unseen fb2

by Georgina Kleege
Download Sight Unseen fb2
Social Sciences
  • Author:
    Georgina Kleege
  • ISBN:
    0300076800
  • ISBN13:
    978-0300076806
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Yale University Press; First Edition - First Printing edition (March 11, 1999)
  • Pages:
    304 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Social Sciences
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1413 kb
  • ePUB format
    1494 kb
  • DJVU format
    1910 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    102
  • Formats:
    mbr lit mobi txt


FREE shipping on qualifying offers.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Legally blind since the age of eleven.

Download books for free. Download (txt, 424 Kb) Donate Read. EPUB FB2 PDF MOBI RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

Legally blind since the age of eleven, Georgina Kleege draws on her experiences to offer a detailed testimony of visual impairmentboth her own view of the world and the world s view of the blind.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 229-233). Legally blind since the age of eleven, Georgina Kleege draws on her experiences to offer a detailed testimony of visual impairment - both her own view of the world and the world's view of the blind. Kleege describes the negative social status of the blind, analyzes stereotypes of the blind that have been perpetuated by movies, and discusses how blindness has been portrayed in literature.

Book's title: Sight unseen Georgina Kleege. Personal Name: Kleege, Georgina, 1956-. Publication, Distribution, et. New Haven, CT. Library of Congress Control Number: 98038773. International Standard Book Number (ISBN): 0300076800 (alk. paper).

Finding books BookSee BookSee - Download books for free.

Georgina Kleege joined the English department at the University of California, Berkeley in 2003 where in addition to teaching creative writing classes she teaches courses on representations of disability in literature, and disability memoir. Her collection of personal essays, Sight Unseen (1999) is a classic in the field of disability studies.

Kleege argues at the start of Sight Unseen that the linear structure This content downloaded from . In this way, Kleege's liminal condition shows us how the boundaries of identity are both highly arbitrary and easily disturbed.

Kleege argues at the start of Sight Unseen that the linear structure This content downloaded from 14. 22. org/terms 158 SUSANNAH B. MINTZ of conventional blindn ness can be separated narrative of transcendence and resolution "presupposes that blindness is somehow outside oneself" (4). Describing.

Последние твиты от Georgina Kleege (ginaKleege). Check out my recent books:Sight Unseen, Blind Rage & More than Meets the Eye. Berkeley, CA. Дата регистрации: июнь 2014 г.

This elegantly written book offers an unexpected and unprecedented account of blindness and sight. Legally blind since the age of eleven, Georgina Kleege draws on her experiences to offer a detailed testimony of visual impairment―both her own view of the world and the world’s view of the blind. “I hope to turn the reader’s gaze outward, to say not only ‘Here’s what I see’ but also ‘Here’s what you see,’ to show both what’s unique and what’s universal,” Kleege writes.Kleege describes the negative social status of the blind, analyzes stereotypes of the blind that have been perpetuated by movies, and discusses how blindness has been portrayed in literature. She vividly conveys the visual experience of someone with severely impaired sight and explains what she can see and what she cannot (and how her inability to achieve eye contact―in a society that prizes that form of connection―has affected her). Finally she tells of the various ways she reads, and the freedom she felt when she stopped concealing her blindness and acquired skills, such as reading braille, as part of a new, blind identity. Without sentimentality or clichés, Kleege offers us the opportunity to imagine life without sight.

Dozilkree
I'd like to start this review by stating that I am a totally blind individual. Although this fact should not convey that I am an expert in writing about vision as is Mrs. Kleege, I wanted to set the stage before beginning my discussion of this book.

I found Ms. Kleege's writing to be academic yet never incomprehensible. Her personal anecdotes were very enjoyable to read. Although I have never seen, Kleege began losing her sight at the age of eleven as the result of macular degeneration. She describes in detail the degree of vision she has and how she is perceived by most people to be sighted because she can "fake it". "Sight Unseen" chronicles Kleege's gradual decision to drop the pretense in a sometimes frightened or hostile world that views sight as something essential.
Kleege explores how all of our culture, (language, movies, literature, ETC.), has served to paint a less-than flattering view of those without sight. The word "blind" has many negative connotations and is associated with sin, evil, darkness, ineptitude, and so much more. I did feel in some instances that Kleege was being overcritical of sighted individuals. By the way: all blind people say, "See you later," or, "It's great to see you". All of us are ordinary people created to make a difference. Sight or lack thereof should be of no consequence. Of course, I'm not naive, and I know advocacy is essential.
My favorite part of the book is Part 3, in which Kleege explores the joy of reading, (Braille and books on audio). I found myself laughing out loud and relating to her with every word in this section. Like her, I love the versatility of different readers narrating the same story, and the self-discoveries awaiting you with each new book that becomes available. Braille was my gateway to the world and broke my barriers of fear and shyness. The section where Kleege discusses her visit to the home of Louis Braille was particularly moving. And, like the author, I love to read in the dark.

The only other thing I'll say is that I did take umbrage to Kleege's criticism of Christ's healing of the blind men in Scripture. She implies that touching their eyes was a form of degradation. Quite the contrary. Christ gave those men back their dignity. In a culture that isolated the disabled and treated them with dirision, Christ broke all the social taboos and said, "I am the way, the truth, and the life. Noone comes to the Father but through me" (John 14-6), and "I am the light of the world. Whoever follows me will never walk in darkness, but will have the light of life" (John 8-12).

This book is worth the read. Please give it a chance. God bless you all.
Berenn
Georgina Kleege has written one of the best books of the year on any subject, and one of the best books ever on sight and disability. Alternating between analysis and autobiography, Kleege moves us through our cultural assumptions about blindness and sight in a provocative--even inspiring--manner.
The impact the book makes is astonishing. For instance, I'll never use vocabulary in quite the same way after reading this book; I find myself wanting to describe it as "illuminating" or "offering insight." That these words are the first to come to mind supports Kleege's thesis; our culture's reliance on sight--and its unjustified fear of blindness--is so woven into the very fabric of language that we often don't recognize the power it has over us. This book has given me a gift: now I find myself being more thoughtful in choosing the exact image or idea I want to communicate. I'll no longer settle for just any "sighted" word that first comes to mind, unless it's the most appropriate for the context.
I like the book's ability to move easily from one style of analysis to another. Kleege has a knack for analyzing a film or book or play in an academic mode, and yet without the usual jargon. For example, her thoughts on the Oedipus myth are quite compelling, as is her take on films like "Children of a Lesser God."
She also includes highly personal essays that exhibit the same rigor of analysis and yet speak to the heart. Her account of learning the Braille system and then visiting Braille's birthplace in France is powerful and moving. Her descriptions of losing her sight in girlhood--as the daughter of two successful visual artists--is equally riveting.
And her medical and scientific explanations of sight and blindness interested me as much as her experience of visiting the art museum to see her favorite paintings, and her memories of playing Helen Keller in a school play. Kleege offers a rich discussion unmatched by other books on this topic.
This book is a must-read and deserves a wide audience. I'll be giving copies as holiday gifts this year.