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by Joseph Rothschild
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Politics & Government
  • Author:
    Joseph Rothschild
  • ISBN:
    0295953578
  • ISBN13:
    978-0295953571
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    University of Washington Press; Reissue edition (December 1, 1974)
  • Pages:
    438 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Politics & Government
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1710 kb
  • ePUB format
    1392 kb
  • DJVU format
    1248 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    780
  • Formats:
    doc mbr lit mobi


This book is a comprehensive treatment of the East Central European region between the First and Second World Wars. It is more forgivable than Rothschild's sparse mention of East Germany in his follow-up to this book, Return to Diversity

This book is a comprehensive treatment of the East Central European region between the First and Second World Wars. The narrative is glib, fluid and thoroughly readable. The author provides copious tables and maps for easy reference, but this is not a "statistical" work. It is more forgivable than Rothschild's sparse mention of East Germany in his follow-up to this book, Return to Diversity. Another noteworthy feature of the book is its hybrid method. When choosing between true country-specific cases and thematic cases (the latter used in Return to Diversity), Rothschild selects features of both.

Professor Rothschild's work added new information on the course of Communist East Europe, especially in. .

Professor Rothschild's work added new information on the course of Communist East Europe, especially in its latter phases. What is lacking is an appreciation of why the USSR moved into this region as it did, insisting on Soviet control by any means necessary. Cold war Western historians largely slight the trauma suffered by Russia and the constituent Soviet republics during World War II, but it's hard to overstate the wanton brutality and devastation the Nazis dealt to the Eastern Front, with the help of East European Axis satellites and collaborators.

In East Central Europe it had tended to have the opposite effect, to fragment a few large units into many smaller ones. This tendency may well prove prophetic of the dominant effect of nationalism in twentieth-century Europe in general, as the Basque, Catalan, Breton, Provençal, Flemish, Scottish, Ukrainian, and other peoples also assert their various claims to national distinctiveness and perhaps to separate statehood. The very existence of the newly independent but highly vulnerable states of East Central Europe, legitimated by the victorious Western Allies, proved on balance a political and diplomatic asset to Germany.

by Joseph Rothschild. East Central Europe Between The Two World Wars is a sophisticated political history of East Central Europe in the interwar years

book by Joseph Rothschild. East Central Europe Between The Two World Wars is a sophisticated political history of East Central Europe in the interwar years  . by Joseph Rothschild. Written by an eminent scholar in the field, it is an original contribution to the literature on the political cultures of Poland, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Yugoslavia, Romania, Bulgaria, Albania, and the Baltic states.

These plans, however, have fallen victim to his failing health. series A History of East Central Europe (HECE). Include any personal information. Mention spoilers or the book's price. 0) 50 characters minimum. Title . The title should be at least 4 characters long.

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by Joseph Rothschild First published December 1st 1974. Eastern Central Europe between the Two World Wars (Paperback). Published 1977 by University of Washington Press (Seattle and London). Second Printing (Paper), with corrections 1977, Paperback, 420 pages.

Since I view this book as a continuation of my East Central Europe Between the Two World Wars (1974), those are valid reasons for omitting East Germany here. Since I view this book as a continuation of my East Central Europe Between the Two World Wars (1974), those are valid reasons for omitting East Germany here.

East Central Europe Between The Two World Wars is a sophisticated political history of East Central Europe in the interwar years. Written by an eminent scholar in the field, it is an original contribution to the literature on the political cultures of Poland, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Yugoslavia, Romania, Bulgaria, Albania, and the Baltic states.

Laizel
This book is a comprehensive treatment of the East Central European region between the First and Second World Wars. The narrative is glib, fluid and thoroughly readable. The author provides copious tables and maps for easy reference, but this is not a "statistical" work. His inclusion of abbreviated studies of the Baltic states simultaneously widens the comparative cases (as these countries are a transitional zone between Central and Eastern Europe) and provides an elucidating contrast (as they did not regain nominal independence during the Cold War). His introduction isolates the key historical foci of the time and place, including class relations, peasantism, the Great Depression and Great Power penetration. The concluding cultural survey is brief but well-researched and offers a happy humanistic conclusion to the unavoidably tragic political and economic cases.
Overall, Rothschild's effort is hugely successful and a pleasure to read, though it is not without idiosyncrasies. Some cases receive far more space (e.g., Poland, Yugoslavia) than others (e.g., Bulgaria, Albania). Some pivotal states within the East Central and Baltic region (Austria, Greece and Finland) aren't given their own cases at all. Perhaps this is because of a conceptual conflation of "East Central Europe" with "Soviet satellites", a common simplification among historians during the Cold War. It is more forgivable than Rothschild's sparse mention of East Germany in his follow-up to this book, Return to Diversity.
Another noteworthy feature of the book is its hybrid method. When choosing between true country-specific cases and thematic cases (the latter used in Return to Diversity), Rothschild selects features of both. Yugoslavia is a case study of the politics of ethnic diversity, Romania of radical right movements, etc., and these features are given great weight in each respective narrative. This method allows the author to give comprehensive treatment to the major themes of the region within a relatively short amount of space, but at the cost of sacrificing truly equivalent comparisons across countries. To put it another way, the Hungarian Arrow Cross was just as much an example of rightist radicalism as the Romanian Iron Guard, but only the latter receives a full analysis.
In sum, I heartily recommend this book to anyone interested in the region, though please don't stop here.
invincible
Well researched, objective, well organized, easily readableEast Central Europe Between the Two World Wars [History of East Central Europe Vol. IX]