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by Dmitri V. Trenin
Download The End of Eurasia: Russia on the Border Between Geopolitics and Globalization fb2
Politics & Government
  • Author:
    Dmitri V. Trenin
  • ISBN:
    0870031902
  • ISBN13:
    978-0870031908
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Carnegie Endowment for Int'l Peace (February 1, 2002)
  • Pages:
    354 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Politics & Government
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1651 kb
  • ePUB format
    1706 kb
  • DJVU format
    1470 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    694
  • Formats:
    lrf lrf mobi rtf


Dmitri Trenin demolishes the windy concept of 'EuroAsia' and meticulously analyses Russia's place in the modern world. That is good news for the rest of u.

Dmitri Trenin demolishes the windy concept of 'EuroAsia' and meticulously analyses Russia's place in the modern world. -Rodric Braithwaite, former British Ambassador to the USSR and to Russia. What Is Russia Up To in the Middle East? Dmitri Trenin. Should We Fear Russia? Dmitri Trenin. Interregnum: Russia Between Past and Future

Includes bibliographical references and index. Pt. 1, A farewell to the empire. 1. The spacial dimension of Russian history. 2. The break-up of the USSR : a break in continuity - pt. 2, Russia's three façades. 3. The western façade

Includes bibliographical references and index. The western façade. 4. The southern tier. 5. The far eastern backyard - pt. 3, Integration. 6. Domestic boundaries and the Russian question. 7. Fitting Russia in - Conclusion : after Eurasia.

Books on geopolitics are popular in Russia. In the West, on the contrary, the subject is often treated as largely irrelevant, and with good reason. The traditional world of nation-states is becoming an international community.

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In this thought-provoking book, Dmitri Trenin argues that .

In this thought-provoking book, Dmitri Trenin argues that Russia must join the West by becoming integrated with the European Union and by building an alliance with the United States. Библиографические данные.

The End of Eurasia book. Ten years after the breakup of the Soviet Union, the issue of Russia's. In this thought-provoking book, Dmitri Trenin argues that Russia must join the West by becoming integrated with the European Union and by building an alliance with the United States. He delineates the political, economic, demographic, religious, Ten years after the breakup of the Soviet Union, the issue of Russia's international identity still remains largely unresolved.

Summary: This book examines contemporary Russian and Eurasian .

Summary: This book examines contemporary Russian and Eurasian politics, contemplating the meaning of "Russia" today and its place in the world. Trenin takes a look at the historical patterns of Russian territorial state formation, seeks to define the challenges and opportunities that Russia faces along its geopolitical fronts, and discusses various options for "fitting" Russia into the wider world. Related Media and Tools. Trenin maintains that the era during which Eurasia was synonymous with Russia is over. About the Author Dmitri Trenin is deputy director of the Carnegie Moscow Center, where he specializes in foreign and security policy.

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oceedings{Trenin2002TheEO, title {The End of Eurasia: Russia on the . Dmitriĭ Vitalʹevich Trenin. Part I A farewell to The Empire: the spatial dimension of Russian history the break-up of the USSR - a break in continuity.

Part I A farewell to The Empire: the spatial dimension of Russian history the break-up of the USSR - a break in continuity. Part II Russia's three facades: the Western facade the Southern tier the Far Eastern backyard. Part III Integration: domestic boundaries and the Russian question fitting Russia in. Conclusion - after Eurasia. View PDF. Save to Library.

Ten years after the breakup of the Soviet Union, the issue of Russia's international identity still remains largely unresolved. In this thought-provoking book, Dmitri Trenin argues that Russia must join the West by becoming integrated with the European Union and by building an alliance with the United States. He delineates the political, economic, demographic, religious, and strategic challenges that Russia faces in relation to neighboring countries—in Eastern Europe, along the Baltic Sea, around the Caspian Sea, in Central Asia, and in the Far East. Trenin suggests that Russia's time as the region's dominant leader is over, and that Russia and Eurasia will no longer share the same geopolitical objectives.


Drelajurus
According to Mr. Trenin the end of Eurasia can be a good thing if the Russians will manage to abandon the idea quickly. Eurasia in this context is not a geographical term, but a mental construct, the idea of uniqueness of Russia and her separate (from the Western civilization) identity and destiny. Russia has a distinctive feature of having more land in Asia than in Europe, which undeniably has had a huge impact on Russian life since 17 century. But from the author's point of view the idea of Eurasia would be foolish pursue since Russia is facing a whole new set of challenges.
The author argues that the collapse of Soviet Union was de facto the end of the idea of Eurasia. With the final end of the Russian Empire (and its short-lived successor - the Soviet Union) myth of Eurasia must also be abandoned. This is the right time for the Russian people to shed this idea once and for all and to join the European civilization where the Russian roots are. A Europe that includes Bulgaria and Turkey cannot close its doors to Russia - at least not on cultural grounds, Mr. Trenin emphasizes. I would also add that, while the concept of Eurasia was first developed by the 19-th century Russian Slavophile, these days it is completely turned around and used by the Western either far-right or far-left circles just to argue how barbaric and "Asiatic" Russia is and always will be. May be if the Russians discard Eurasia myth, the Western academics and policy-makers will finally give up using Marquis de Custine's book written in 1839 as the ultimate source of knowledge about Russia!

The author notes that the most important thing for a state has always been the sense of identity stemming from clear realization of its geographical limits - borders. In tsarist Russia and then in Soviet Union this idea was basically absent. Russia has emerged as an imperial-minded state, conqueror of the ever-moving frontiers. The frontiers had been shifting from the Urals to the Pacific and from the Polar Circle to Afghanistan. As a result Russia has never emerged as a nation state. The human and other recourses were routinely taken by the rules and invested in the continuously expanding borderlands at the expense of Russia proper.

The time of these spreading out Empires has passed. To survive in the XXI century Russia (which is significantly smaller now) needs to be integrated to the Western economic and political environment. But the part can integrate into whole only when the part is aware of its own limits. Russia needs to maintain secure borders, which connect rather than separate countries. Only then the true integration is possible. Russia can recreate itself only through its successful relationship with the West. It will have - the author argues - to recognize that its place in Europe will rest on its ability to integrate, not on its political-military influence beyond its borders.
The author correctly argues that with NATO quickly expanding Russia faces the prospect of progressive marginalization. This prospect can be stopped only by a conscious Russian decision in favor of Europe. The Eurasia myth must be buried. In the same time Mr. Trenin is aware that there are Western high-profiled advocates of dismantling of the Russian state (for example, Mr. Zbignev Brzezinski has offered three loosely confederated Russian States). Or rather there are some people in the West who "love" Russia so much that they prefer to see several of them.
The other point, which Mr. Trenin is not making but it is implicit, is that Russia cannot any longer play the role of " the Great Satan" for the West. Mr. Churchill and Mr. Truman (I would argue) successfully prodded Stalin on this role. The Soviet Union so dutifully (and foolishly) played "The Evil Empire" for 40 years. Russia simply can't afford anything like this - catastrophic population decline (Russia has approximately the same population as Pakistan) and underdeveloped economy are more important than anything else. Of course, with stunning $300+ billion budget the American military has to have some enemy. Russia is fortunate that the West is looking for it elsewhere. It would be wise if Russia continues to refrain from assuming the role of the Western antagonist and refuse any attempt by the "friends" inside and outside to drag her into that unrewarding role (over Chechnya, NATO, etc).
This is a well-researched book from a very insightful observer. Mr. Trenin is retired Russian army officer who participated in arms control negotiations. He is now with the Carnegie Endowment for International peace in Moscow. I disagree with the author on some minor points (also he can be perceived as someone who idealizes the West a little too much), but totally agree with his main lines of thought. What adds weight to this book is the fact that Russia under Putin's leadership seems to be moving (slowly but steadily) to the same direction as the author suggests. I recommend this book to everyone interested in Russian affairs.
Celen
A nice look into the geo-politics of Central Asia and the former Soviet Republics. And older book but still can relate to it in today's world.