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by N. Bernstein Tarrow
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Politics & Government
  • Author:
    N. Bernstein Tarrow
  • ISBN:
    0080334156
  • ISBN13:
    978-0080334158
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Pergamon (October 10, 2014)
  • Pages:
    274 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Politics & Government
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Education as a human right and education for human rights are currently the topics of considerable debate worldwide

Education as a human right and education for human rights are currently the topics of considerable debate worldwide.

Human Rights and Education book. by Norma Bernstein Tarrow. Human Rights and Education (Comparative and International Education). 0080334156 (ISBN13: 9780080334158).

Human rights and education viewed in a comparative framework .

Human rights and education viewed in a comparative framework: synthesis and conclusions. This book discusses the relationship between human rights and education. Education as a human right and education for human rights are currently the topics of considerable debate worldwide. For policy makers, students of peace and conflict studies, education and international relations and educational anthropology; also for students of political science, sociology and public policy.

The term comparative education (CE) is not a mono-faceted or monophonic system. It is an inter- and multidisciplinary ‘human science’, an episteme in Nicholas Hans’ sense of Vergleichende t (Hans, 1959: 299)

The term comparative education (CE) is not a mono-faceted or monophonic system. It is an inter- and multidisciplinary ‘human science’, an episteme in Nicholas Hans’ sense of Vergleichende t (Hans, 1959: 299). Historically, the genealogical roots of CE have been traced to the ‘modernist’ epoch of the European Enlightenment of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries.

Formal education is a conscious effort by human society to impart the skills and modes of thought considered essential for social functioning. Techniques of instruction often reflect the attitudes of society, . Development of Education. In ancient Greece education for freemen was a matter of studying Homer, mathematics, music, and gymnastics.

Global Discourses and Local Practices: Teaching Citizenship and Human Rights in Postgenocide Rwanda.

Comparative education is a discipline in the social sciences which entails the scrutiny and evaluation of different educational systems, such as those in various countries. Professionals in this area of endeavor are absorbed in advancing evocative terminologies and guidelines for education worldwide, enhancing educational structures and producing a context to which the success and effectivity of education programs and initiatives can be assessed.

Human rights and education policy in South Asia. Holocaust education offers numerous opportunities to engage critically in comparative and prospective reflection that relates to human rights

Human rights and education policy in South Asia. In K. Mundy, A. Green, R. Lingard & A. Verger (Ed. Handbook of global policy and policy-making in education (pp. 206-223) more. Holocaust education offers numerous opportunities to engage critically in comparative and prospective reflection that relates to human rights. This paper claims that its relevance transcends regional and cultural limitations and that an analytical and comparative approach-tempered with critical reflection on historical context, collective memory, and the implications of its status as a symbol of evil-is preferable to one based on empathy.

The right to education has been recognized as a human right in a number of international conventions, including the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights which recognizes a right to free, compulsory primary education for all,.

This book discusses the relationship between human rights and education. Education as a human right and education for human rights are currently the topics of considerable debate worldwide. In addition to their traditional role of transmitting knowledge and values, education systems are being pressed to respond to a new range of aspirations and to a wide variety of economic, political, social and cultural developments whose roots lie outside the education system. Human rights education is much wider than just teaching about human rights; it should lead to an understanding of, and sympathy for, the concepts of democracy, justice, equality, freedom, solidarity, peace, dignity, rights and responsibilities. Young people are guaranteed their right to education, and education systems should equip them with the knowledge, skills and attitudes they will need if they are to take an active part in the operation of democratic institutions.