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by Mary Robinson,Paulo David
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Politics & Government
  • Author:
    Mary Robinson,Paulo David
  • ISBN:
    0415305586
  • ISBN13:
    978-0415305587
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Routledge; 1 edition (December 16, 2004)
  • Pages:
    352 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Politics & Government
  • Language:
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Does competitive sport respect children's human rights? Is intensive training child labour? Is competitive stress a form of child abuse? The human rights of children have been recognized in the 1989 UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, and ratified by 192 countries.

Does competitive sport respect children's human rights? Is intensive training child labour? Is competitive stress a form of child abuse? The human rights of children have been recognized in the 1989 UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, and ratified by 192 countries. Paulo David's work makes it clear, however, that too often competitive sport fails to recognize the value of respect for international child rights norms and standards

Does competitive sport respect children's human rights? Is intensive training child labour? Is competitive stress a form of child abuse? The human rights of children have been recognized in the 1989 UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, and ratified by 192 countries.

The human rights of children have been recognized in the 1989 UN. .

The human rights of children have been recognized in the 1989 UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, and ratified by 192 countries. Paulo David's work makes it clear, however, that too often competitive sport fails to recognize the value of respect for international child rights norms and standards. Human Rights in Youth Sport offers critical analysis of some very real problems within youth sport and argues that the future development of sport depends on the creation of a child-centred sport system. The text will be essential reading for anybody with an interest in the ethics of sport, youth sport, coaching and sports development.

Published by ROUTLEDGE in LONDON. Written in Undetermined.

Sports are activities involving physical exertion and skill, in which a team compete against another as a form of entertainment. The universality of sport allows it to encompass several different rights

Sports are activities involving physical exertion and skill, in which a team compete against another as a form of entertainment. The universality of sport allows it to encompass several different rights. Most sporting events have a huge impact on human rights. Human rights are rights that are believed to belong to justifiably every person. In particular youth sport which concerns the rights of children.

complication of permanent pacing.

Key words: Children, youth sport, human rights. treatment of children’s rights in sport. Paulo David’s comprehensive analysis, drawn from his unique insights while working for the UN High Commission for Human Rights, is therefore particularly welcome. Part I sets out the conceptual framework for the book, which takes human rights as the starting point for analysis, and establishes the notion of the child as active agent, bearer of rights and acquiring progressive autonomy. In Part II, David questions whether the principle of the ‘best interests of the child’ is compatible with children’s early involvement in competitive sport.

Routledge, Abingdon, Oxford. The European Convention on Human Rights of 4 November 1950. Asser Press and the author 2017. Authors and Affiliations.

Does competitive sport respect children's human rights? Is intensive training child labour? Is competitive stress a form of child abuse?

The human rights of children have been recognized in the 1989 UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, and ratified by 192 countries. Paulo David's work makes it clear, however, that too often competitive sport fails to recognize the value of respect for international child rights norms and standards.

Human Rights in Youth Sport offers critical analysis of some very real problems within youth sport and argues that the future development of sport depends on the creation of a child-centred sport system. Areas of particular concern include issues of:

over-training physical, emotional and sexual abuse doping and medical ethics education child labour accountability of governments, sports federations, coaches and parents.

The text will be essential reading for anybody with an interest in the ethics of sport, youth sport, coaching and sports development.