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by Philip J. Eldridge
Download Non-Government Organizations and Democratic Participation in Indonesia (South-East Asian Social Science Monographs) fb2
Politics & Government
  • Author:
    Philip J. Eldridge
  • ISBN:
    9676530913
  • ISBN13:
    978-9676530912
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Oxford University Press (January 4, 1996)
  • Pages:
    296 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Politics & Government
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1484 kb
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    1463 kb
  • DJVU format
    1694 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
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    152
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Start by marking Non-Government Organizations and Democratic Participation in Indonesia as Want to Read .

Start by marking Non-Government Organizations and Democratic Participation in Indonesia as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. This book explores the complex relations between the Indonesian government and groups working for change in fields as diverse as health, mobilization of women, human rights, and environment.

Non-Government Organizations and Democratic Participation in Indonesia

Non-Government Organizations and Democratic Participation in Indonesia. This book is an important study not only for readers interested in contemporary Indonesia and political change in Asia, but also for all those interested in democratization processes elsewhere in the world.

Non-Government Organizations and Democratic Participation in Indonesia. by Philip J. Eldridge. Daniel S. Lev. Philip J.

and Miguel et al. 2002). Non-Government Organizations and Democratic Participation in Indonesia.

Recommend this journal. The Journal of Asian Studies. Full text views reflects the number of PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views. Total number of HTML views: 0. Total number of PDF views: 0 .

Southeast Asian regimes run the gamut from liberal and illiberal . Challenging authoritarianism in Southeast Asia: Comparing Indonesia and Malaysia. New York: RoutledgeCurzon.

Southeast Asian regimes run the gamut from liberal and illiberal democracy to military authoritarianism and absolute monarchy. Still, all states in the region leave at least some space for civil society (including informal opposition) and even formal opposition. Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia: Oxford University Press.

Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Education and Globalization in. .

Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Education and Globalization in Southeast Asia: Issues and Challenges" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

The divide between the West and Southeast Asia seems to be nowhere . In this new book Philip J Eldridge seeks to question this stalemate.

The divide between the West and Southeast Asia seems to be nowhere more apparent than in debates about human rights. Within these diverse geographical, political and cultural climates, human rights seem to have become relative, and the quest for absolutes seems unattainable.

As Southeast Asian countries democratise, and therefore societies as well as governments interact more closely, human rights .

As Southeast Asian countries democratise, and therefore societies as well as governments interact more closely, human rights are becoming increasingly part of such engagement. In the short term at least, democratisation in Indonesia and East Timor's secession, coinciding with populist re-directions in Australia's regional policy, have worsened relations at both societal and elite levels.

Non-governmental organizations (also known as NGOs, nongovernmental organizations, or nongovernment organizations) are organizations independent of any government. They are usually non-profit, and many NGOs are active in humanitarian or social areas; however, NGOs can also be lobby groups for corporations, such as the World Economic Forum

Commentators have tended to view the Indonesian political system as a closed circle. By contrast, this book looks to the wider civil society for sources of change. It focuses on the contribution of Indonesian non-government organizations (NGOs) both in promoting participatory models of change in social and economic development and as part of a more general movement towards democratization. The capacity of NGOs to achieve such goals depends on maximizing their autonomy from the Indonesian state. For this purpose, various strategies entailing co-operation, critical collaboration, or the minimizing of contact with the government have been devised. By contrast, students and other radicals have moved towards a more directly confrontational stance. These approaches are explored in a wide variety of contexts, such as primary health, water users' associations, co-operatives and credit unions, the urban informal sector, labour and human rights, the environment, and the mobilization of women. Legal, funding, cultural, and religious aspects are also featured, together with some international dimensions, while the capacity of NGOs for networking and coalition-building is assessed. The work concludes with an exploration of likely scenarios and options confronting Indonesian NGOs in a rapidly changing environment.