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by Henry Kissinger,Peter W. Rodman
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Politics & Government
  • Author:
    Henry Kissinger,Peter W. Rodman
  • ISBN:
    0307390527
  • ISBN13:
    978-0307390523
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Vintage; 1 edition (January 12, 2010)
  • Pages:
    368 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Politics & Government
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1566 kb
  • ePUB format
    1963 kb
  • DJVU format
    1884 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    609
  • Formats:
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Rodman, who was a protégé of Henry Kissinger, offers useful insights into the conduct of American foreign policy from 1968 through 2007. He covers the national security history of the Nixon, Ford, Carter, Reagan, George . Bush, Clinton and George W. Bush administrations

Rodman, who was a protégé of Henry Kissinger, offers useful insights into the conduct of American foreign policy from 1968 through 2007. Bush administrations. In an author's note, Rodman writes: "The book conveys a few simple points - lessons if you will - about how presidents can best maintain.

Presidential Command book. An official in the Nixon, Ford, Reagan, and both Bush administrations, Peter W. Rodman draws on his firsthand knowledge of the Oval Office to explore the foreign-policy leadership of every president from Nixon to George W. Bush.

Author Peter W. Rodman Publisher Knopf Publication Date 2009-01-06 Section US History. Type New Format Hardcover ISBN 9780307269799. An important contribution in the wake of recent American experiences abroad, and an essential book for the new administration, here is a fascinating, in-depth look at what actually happens in the Oval Office from a respected expert who has held high-level positions in several governments.

Автор: Rodman Peter W. Название: Presidential Command: Power, Leadership, and the Making .

from the war by the United States Army and the IDF. This book, which relies heavily on government documents and other primary sources of information, fills important descriptive and analytical gaps in the academic literature about the Yom Kippur War.

Presidential Command. Power, Leadership, and the Making of Foreign Policy from Richard Nixon to George. Peter W. Rodman was a senior fellow in foreign policy at the Brookings Institution in Washington, . By Peter W. Rodman Introduction by Henry Kissinger. He served as deputy assistant to the president for National Security Affairs, as director of the State Department’s Policy Planning Staff, as specia. ore about Peter W. Rodman. About Peter W.

Presidential Command is an odd hodge-podge of a book PRESIDENTIAL COMMAND. Power, Leadership, and the Making of Foreign Policy From Richard Nixon to George W.

Presidential Command is an odd hodge-podge of a book. Mr. Rodman can be highly insightful when it comes to assessing historical dynamics. He is fascinating on the management styles of Truman and Dwight D. Eisenhower, and he is fair-minded, if tough, on the Democratic administrations of Jimmy Carter and Bill Clinton. PRESIDENTIAL COMMAND.

Illuminating the qualities of personal, focus, determination, persuasiveness, and consistency-that determine a president's ability to guide his staff, Rodman makes clear how these qualities shape policy and determine how this policy is implemented. This is a vivid story of larger-than-life Washington personalities in action, and an insightful primer on executive leadership. From publisher description.

Items related to Presidential Command: Power, Leadership, and . 30 day return policy. Books Express LLC 318 US Route 1, STE 2 Kittery ME 03904.

Items related to Presidential Command: Power, Leadership, and the Making. He served as deputy assistant to the president for National Security Affairs, as director of the State Department’s Policy Planning Staff, as special assistant to Henry Kissinger in the White House, and, most recently, as assistant secretary of defense of international security affairs.

Presidential Command: Power, Leadership, and the Making of Foreign Policy .

Presidential Command: Power, Leadership, and the Making of Foreign Policy from Richard Nixon to George W. Bush (2009). the key to multilateralism is not what one thinks of the United Nations but what one thinks of the United States. Those who believe that global freedom and peace and the cause of human rights have more often than not been advanced if not sustained by the United States, acting out of some combination of its own self-interest and a general interest, will find multilateralism a potential source of paralysis.

An important contribution in the wake of recent American experiences abroad, and an essential book for the new administration, here is a fascinating, in-depth look at what actually happens in the Oval Office from a respected expert who has held high-level positions in several governments. Book Details Rs 100 Rs 9. 0.

An official in the Nixon, Ford, Reagan, and both Bush administrations, Peter W. Rodman draws on his firsthand knowledge of the Oval Office to explore the foreign-policy leadership of every president from Nixon to George W. Bush. This riveting and informative book about the inner workings of our government is rich with anecdotes and fly-on-the-wall portraits of presidents and their closest advisors. It is essential reading for historians, political junkies, and for anyone in charge of managing a large organization.

Modimeena
The late national security expert, Peter W. Rodman, wrote a book just before he died that should be essential reading for every serious U.S. Presidential candidate.

Rodman, who was a protégé of Henry Kissinger, offers useful insights into the conduct of American foreign policy from 1968 through 2007. He covers the national security history of the Nixon, Ford, Carter, Reagan, George H.W. Bush, Clinton and George W. Bush administrations. A lot of mistakes were made during those administrations, and Rodman provides an acute sense of analysis to what went right and what went wrong in each of those administrations. In an author's note, Rodman writes:

"The book conveys a few simple points - lessons if you will - about how presidents can best maintain their personal control and policy direction. They are summed up in the last chapter, but the themes are threads that run throughout the book. They have to do with the inescapable necessity for presidents to be personally and systematically engaged, lest feuds between cabinet agencies fester or bureaucracies remain unresponsive to presidential preferences. These may seem obvious points, yet the account of seven presidencies that follows includes a perhaps surprising number of negative examples that demonstrate the price that is paid when their importance is not understood."

Rodman then proceeds to critique the American foreign policy from 1969 through 2008, the year the author died.

The author was a statesman with a conservative outlook, to be sure, but his observations generally rise above politics. He critiques both Republican and Democratic administrations with perceptive analysis.

Richard Nixon, according to Rodman, lost control the American foreign policy apparatus. "...the uproar over Watergate (and Vietnam) spawned a generational of institutional changes that weakened the presidency and strengthened the checks on it. Since then we have lived in an age of legally protected whistle-blowers, a vast expansion of what some would call congressional micromanagement of policy in every field, a web of legislative restrictions on presidential discretion, a strengthened Freedom of Information Act, war power legislation and the virtual institutional of leaking, including of classified documents. This is Richard Nixon's ironic legacy."

Rodman is most critical of Jimmy Carter. Carter was overwhelmed by the bureaucracy of the U.S State Department, according to Rodman, and watched his presidency decline into the morass of revolutionary Iran (the decline of the Shah and the rise of the Muslim extremists) who held American diplomats hostage until the end of the Carter Administration.

Ronald Reagan received mixed grades from Rodman:

"The paradox of Ronald Reagan is that he was one of the most important presidents of the modern era, who left his bold imprint on his administration and on history, yet on issues on which he was less engaged, his management of government has to be rate among the weakest...but both sides of this paradox deserve their proper respect."

Reagan was an idealist who had "a moral mission to be the `shining city on a hill,'" writes Rodman. But Reagan was also a poor manager, who was perhaps to aloof from his duties. Thus we see Al Haig trying to hijack American policy, and the rise of the Iran-Contra scandal where Reagan's staff tried to sell Iran weapons to fund the defense of Nicaragua from a communist takeover.

Bill Clinton demonstrated a lack of real interest in national security and foreign policy issues (focusing on domestic and economic issues), and his lack of interest was buttressed by his first Secretary of State, the cautious Warren Christopher. But Clinton did redeem himself when he finally took decisive action in the Balkan states as they crumbled and then, with America's help, restored equilibrium between Bosnia, Croatia and Serbia.

Finally, Rodman takes on the administration of George W. Bush. Rodman admired Bush 43's decisiveness and confidence, but he questioned some of the advice that he received, including the intelligence on Iraq Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD). In particular, Rodman is critical of what he alls "the politicization of our intelligence professions (which) is a serious matter for the longer term."

"Politicization can come from either of two directions - form the leadership of an administration, or from an impulse to oppose the leadership of an administration. The latter is no more desirable than the former. Future presidents of whatever party will come to regret the bureaucratic indiscipline, even if it has been indulged lately in some quarters because partisan temptations were too hard to resist. When it happens, it is not only the political leadership of an administration that suffers. It is decidedly unhealthy for the intelligence professional to expose themselves to such political pressures; they risk losing credibility if they let themselves in drawn into positions of political advocacy."

Rodman's final chapter, "Lessons Learned," is a short summary of the leadership issues that the author raises. It provides invaluable advice to anyone who aspires to a leadership position in Washington.

This is an excellent book. Well written, it is born from first-hand experience during the last 40 years - a period which did not especially distinguish the conduct of American foreign policy.
Zeks Horde
I highly recommend this book for people who are interested in foreign policy. Rodman presents our former presidents in action with a lot of details which are unkown to most of us.

The book make me think who is the most influential person in foreign policy in President Obama's Administration. The Secretary of State? The Secretary of Defense? The head of the Pentagon? The National Security Advisor?

I hope we do not have a headless chicken operation in foreign policy. As we learned from Peter Rodman's book, each president has a particular management style in foreign policy. Traditionaly,the key person who advice the president has a well rounded intelectual education in geopolitics; good management skills; without a personal agenda to advance his or her own interest, and above all, that person has the full trust of the president.
Malien
This book is a must read for anybody interested in United States foreign policy. It is gracefully written, and exudes a forthright integrity that can only come from deep, hands-on experience.

Peter Rodman served in senior posts in every Republican administration since Nixon, working at State, DoD, and the White House. He participated directly in many of the events that he analyzes. Despite this close personal association with the subject matter, throughout the book Rodman maintains a cold and penetrating objectivity.

Rodman does reveal his personal loyalties and policy preferences, but this book is utterly devoid of special pleading. Contrary to what some of the other reviewers have suggested, it does not attempt to sell this or that policy position or to glorify this or that personality. Its subject is the set of challenges that ALL presidents, Republican and Democratic, face when they try to set up an effective process for making national security policy.

I served in government with Rodman in the last administration. Having come from academia with no previous policy experience, his book has helped me enormously to make some sense out of what I learned on the inside. On the outside, policy analysis and debate is a purely intellectual activity. On the inside, the intellectual component is overshadowed by the interplay between personalities and bureaucracies that this book so deftly describes.

Peter Rodman passed away last August. He was a very gentle and intelligent man. While I am thankful that he managed to leave us this book (as well as his other work, MORE PRECIOUS THAN PEACE), its unique quality makes one sadly aware of how much more he had to offer as a scholar.
Wooden Purple Romeo
A wonderfully written and insightful survey of presidential-executive branch dynamics. Serious, balanced, straightforward. A very nice read, it makes a great gift.
Agalen
I would recommend this book to anyone. Read it in school and bought it for my dad as a bday gift.