» » The Barometer of Modern Reason: On the Philosophies of Current Events (Odéon)

Download The Barometer of Modern Reason: On the Philosophies of Current Events (Odéon) fb2

by Stephen Adam Schwartz,Vincent Descombes
Download The Barometer of Modern Reason: On the Philosophies of Current Events (Odéon) fb2
Politics & Government
  • Author:
    Stephen Adam Schwartz,Vincent Descombes
  • ISBN:
    0195066812
  • ISBN13:
    978-0195066814
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Oxford University Press (March 25, 1993)
  • Pages:
    208 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Politics & Government
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1843 kb
  • ePUB format
    1734 kb
  • DJVU format
    1953 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    717
  • Formats:
    rtf lit docx azw


Start by marking The Barometer of Modern Reason: On the .

Start by marking The Barometer of Modern Reason: On the Philosophies of Current Events as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Directeur Vincent Descombes. How should philosophy deal with world events? Vincent Descombes examines the ways in which major modern philosophers have developed the barometers that they use to tell us about modern reason and the spirit of the times. He examines the so-called "return to Kant" characteristic of projects like Foucault's "ontology of the present," Habermas's critical theory of history, and Heidegger's "epochal" understanding of metaphysics.

Descombes has also written an introduction to modern French philosophy (Le même et l'autre) focused on the transition . Philosophie par gros temps, 1989 Trans. The Barometer of Modern Reason: On the Philosophies of Current Events, Oxford University Press, 1993.

Descombes has also written an introduction to modern French philosophy (Le même et l'autre) focused on the transition, after 1960, from a focus on the three H's, Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel, Edmund Husserl and Martin Heidegger to the "three masters of suspicion", Karl Marx, Friedrich Nietzsche and Sigmund Freud. La denrée mentale, 1995.

Library of Congress Control Number: 92014531. Personal Name: Descombes, Vincent. Publication, Distribution, et. New York. International Standard Book Number (ISBN): 0195066812 (alk. paper). Oxford University Press, (c)1993. Physical Description: 187 p. ;, 22 cm. Series Statement

Barometer of Modern Reason. On the Philosophies of Current Events. by Vincent Descombes. Published 1993 by Oxf. U. P. (N. . Translated from the French S. A. Schwartz.

Barometer of Modern Reason. History, Methodology, Modern Philosophy, Philosophy, Modern. 190. The Physical Object.

Vincent Descombes is the author of Modern French Philosophy, Objects of All Sorts: A Philosophical Grammar, Proust: Philosophy of the Novel, and The Barometer of Modern Reason: On the Philosophies of Current Events

Vincent Descombes is the author of Modern French Philosophy, Objects of All Sorts: A Philosophical Grammar, Proust: Philosophy of the Novel, and The Barometer of Modern Reason: On the Philosophies of Current Events. Stephen Adam Schwartz, who teaches in the Department of French, University College Dublin, translated Descombe's The Barometer of Modern Reason.

The Barometer of Modern Reason: On the Philosophies of Current Events, Oxford University Press, 1993. The Mind's Provisions: A Critique of Cognitivism, Princeton University Press, 2001. Les institutions du sens, 1996. The Institutions of Meaning: A Defense of Anthropological Holism, Harvard University Press, 2014. Le complément de sujet, 2004.

Vincent Descombes (born 1943) is a French philosopher. He is particularly noted for a lengthy critique in two volumes of the project he calls cognitivism, and which is, roughly, the view current in philosophy of mind that mental and psychological facts can ultimately be treated as, or reduced to, physical facts about the brain.

Philosophers are often asked for their views on the "meaning of the times." But how should philosophy deal with world events? And what makes a philosopher more qualified than anyone else to editorialize in the daily paper? In this book, Descombes's intention is not to offer his own reading of the signs of the times, but to interrogate modern philosophers about how they come up with the barometers they use to tell us about modern reason and the spirit of the times. For Descombes, a "philosophical discourse of modernity" should be rejected, for the true subject of modernity belongs not to philosophers, but to writers, moralists, and sociologists of individualism.