» » Psychoanalysis and Feminism

Download Psychoanalysis and Feminism fb2

by Juliet Mitchell
Download Psychoanalysis and Feminism fb2
Politics & Government
  • Author:
    Juliet Mitchell
  • ISBN:
    0517178877
  • ISBN13:
    978-0517178874
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Random House Value Publishing (June 17, 1997)
  • Subcategory:
    Politics & Government
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1866 kb
  • ePUB format
    1473 kb
  • DJVU format
    1338 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    361
  • Formats:
    mbr txt lit lrf


seminal text, Psychoanalysis and Feminism, forty years after its publication. Feminism: Then and Now. You have looked back at the book already on. some occasions, for example writing the new introduction for the 2000.

seminal text, Psychoanalysis and Feminism, forty years after its publication. As part of our planning, the interviewers decided that the interview transcript.

Juliet Mitchell is a British academic (her field was English literature) who has emerged recently as a leading Marxist .

Psychoanalysis and Feminism is a book of provocative imagination and ambition which sets out to transform our view of Freud and history on the same large scale as, say, Herbert Marcuse's Eros and Civilization or Norman O. Brown's Life Againit Death.

But those like Juliet Mitchell, who laid out her ideas in the influential Psychoanalysis and Feminism: Freud .

But those like Juliet Mitchell, who laid out her ideas in the influential Psychoanalysis and Feminism: Freud, Reich, Laing and Women (London: Vintage Books, 1974), found in the legacy of Freud a theory of child socialisation and psychosocial life which was rich enough to grasp the depth of gender and sexual identit. I’m not a feminist psychoanalyst, I’m a psychoanalyst and a feminist, they meet in me, so to speak, but I don’t want to prescribe feminism.

Juliet Mitchell’s book Psychoanalysis and Feminism (1974) argues that Freud’s analysis of the Oedipus complex is key to understanding how patriarchal ideology perpetuates itself through the institution of the family-as-mediator between nature (biology) and culture (social rules.

Juliet Mitchell’s book Psychoanalysis and Feminism (1974) argues that Freud’s analysis of the Oedipus complex is key to understanding how patriarchal ideology perpetuates itself through the institution of the family-as-mediator between nature (biology) and culture (social rules and roles). Resolution of the Oedipus complex involves moving from a two-person (dyadic) relationship to a triangular (three-person) relationship.

Juliet Mitchell has risked accusations of apostasy from her fellow feminists. Juliet Mitchell, the author of Psychoanalysis and Feminism, is currently a visiting professor in Comparative Literature at Yale University, where she is also a Fellow of the Whitney Humanities Center.

Mitchell, Juliet (2000), "The castration complex and penis-envy", in Mitchell, Juliet (e., Psychoanalysis and feminism: a radical reassessment of Freudian psychoanalysis, New York City: Basic Books, pp. 95–100, ISBN 9780465046089

Mitchell, Juliet (2000), "The castration complex and penis-envy", in Mitchell, Juliet (e. 95–100, ISBN 9780465046089. Mitchell, Juliet (2000), "Conclusion: The holy family and femininity", in Mitchell, Juliet (e. 364–416, ISBN 9780465046089.

Psychoanalysis and Feminism book. In 1974, at the height of the women's movement, Juliet Mitchell shocked her fellow feminists by challenging the entrenched belief that Freud was the enemy. She argued that a rejection of psychoanalysis as bourgeois and patriarchal was fatal. A groundbreaking book-the first to argue that feminism must draw on psychoanalysis to understand the ideological oppression of women.

Feminist theories of psychoanalysis emerged towards the second half of the 20th century, in an. .

Feminist theories of psychoanalysis emerged towards the second half of the 20th century, in an effort to articulate the feminine, the maternal and sexual difference and development from the point of view of female subjects. Feminist psychoanalysis is mainly post-Freudian and post-Lacanian with theorists like Toril Moi, Joan Copjec, Juliet Mitchell, Teresa Brennan and Griselda Pollock, following French feminist psychoanalysis, the gaze and sexual difference in, of and from the feminine. French theorists like Luce Irigaray challenge phallogocentrism. Bracha Ettinger offers a "matrixial" subject's dimension that.

Juliet Mitchell trained as a psychoanalyst in the 1970s and worked full time in private practice in London and then . It is, astonishingly, more than forty years since the publication of Juliet Mitchell’s Psychoanalysis and Feminism

Juliet Mitchell trained as a psychoanalyst in the 1970s and worked full time in private practice in London and then in Cambridge where, in 1996 she combined this with an academic post. Since her retirement from Cambridge in 2008 she continues to write and teach on psychoanalysis worldwide. It is, astonishingly, more than forty years since the publication of Juliet Mitchell’s Psychoanalysis and Feminism. This famous and ground breaking text reclaimed aspects of the intellectual and therapeutic thrust of Freudian psychoanalysis within academia and the Clinic.

Mitchell, J. (1974) Psychoanalysis and Feminism: Freud, Reich, Laing, and Women. New York: Vintage Books. Mitchell, J. (2000) Psychoanalysis and Feminism: A Radical Reassessment of Freudian Psychoanalysis. New York: Basic Books. Nägele, R. (1979) The provocation of Lacan. New German Critique 16: 5–30. CrossRefGoogle Scholar.


Leceri
An insightful godsend... it has been a lonnnng time since I did not fall asleep reading. A literary must for the conscious male or deprived female.
Ximinon
this book is a stimulating classic which makes you think about your own life as well as philosophy, ideology, and the battle to exist with dignity.
SoSok
Juliet Mitchell (born 1940) is a British psychoanalyst and socialist feminist who is the Director of the Expanded Doctoral School in Psychoanalytic Studies at University College London; she has written/edited other books such as Feminine Sexuality: Jacques Lacan and the école freudienne,Selected Melanie Klein,Woman's Estate, etc. She wrote in the Introduction to this 1974 book, "This book has a double and criss-cross purpose. Feminist critics of Freud have not only conflated his theories with those of other, often diverging, analysts and with popularizations, but, with more serious consequences still, have extrapolated his ideas about femininity from their context within the large theories of psychoanalysis." (Pg. xiii-xiv)

She states, "When Freud first formulated the 'castration complex' it explained all there was to know about the difference between the sexes---it defined the girl and made the boy abandon his incestuous wish for the mother. The girl felt totally inferior, because she lacked something, and the boy felt temporarily inferior to his more phallicly powerful father. The castration complex ended the boy's Oedipus complex and therewith his infancy. It seemed to lie behind all neuroses, to dominate all dreams and perversions, to account for the social inferiorization of women... and for the glorification of men." (Pg. 75-76)

She says, "It is [Wilhelm] Reich's notion of a sexual revolution, and its contribution then and now to the possible liberation of women, that concerns us specifically." (Pg. 153) She argues, "Reich's crucial misconception of the unconscious as merely the pool of instincts... [is] the cardinal error from which all initial confusion and all his future work stems... it is the nuclear misunderstanding around which all his work revolves... it was this misunderstanding that motivated first his interest in psychoanalysis and later, his own orgonomy. Without such an error, he would never have achieved so much." (Pg. 187) She adds, "Reich perpetually stressed the importance of female sexuality. He saw the passive nature of woman as a pathological product of a society committed to her suppression." (Pg. 199)

She suggests, "Freud was inclined to make quips against feminism. One suspects that the intention was to make the militant women feel that they were vainly, and somewhat madly, tilting at windmills. But... his aloofness has only further infuriated the second wave of feminists who have had the decades of 'the psychological sell' to fan their fury. Freud is target number one..." (Pg. 303) She concludes on the note, "It is not a question of changing (or ending) who has or how one has babies. It is a question of overthrowing patriarchy. As the end of 'eternal' class conflict is visible within the contradictions of capitalism, so too, it would seem, is the swan-song of the 'immoral' nature of patriarchal culture to be heard." (Pg. 416)

This book is of considerable interest---and not merely of "historical" interest---to anyone studying the relationship of Freudianism and modern feminism.
Kaim
I just wanted to give an excerpt from this book so that interested buyers can read the main ideas and have a better idea of the author's purpose. This excerpt is from the Introduction: "The greater part of the feminist movement has identified Freud as the enemy. It is held that psychoanalysis claims women are infereior and that they can achieve true femininity only as wives and mothers... I would agree that popularized Freudianism must answer to this description; but the argument of this book is that a rejection of psychoanalysis and of Freud's works is fatal for feminism... If we are interested in understanding and challenging the oppression of women, we cannot afford to neglect it."
In general this is an important work for anyone interested in Feminism or Psychology to read. The points that Mitchell makes are applicable for anyone in these fields.
Ces
Here, this is for all of the feminists out there who have been told to dislike Freud, but are not quite sure why. Mitchell is an excellent writer. She is clear, and accessible, without giving up the complexity of her selected content.
Laizel
I've been reading Freud's work as well as the work of other psychoanalysts for nearly forty years. Occasionally I've come across books that I found unacceptable and sadly this was one of them. If someone is going to write a book it should be an attempt to make the truth of what they believe to be the case clear to the reader. The obscure phrasing and convoluted explanations signaled to me that this wasn't an attempt to explain so much as one meant to impress, that is to give an impression of complexity. I understood what the author was saying, but what I couldn't initially understand is why the author wrote her explanations in the way she did. I stopped at the end of the third chapter because I couldn't take anymore of the pretentious overly complicated way of stating what could have been put forward far more clearly. It was if this author was deliberately attempting to make Freud's ideas more obscure and convoluted than they were.
Looking through the rest of the book it was clear that the text was based on a synthesis of ideas from the Lacanian and Kleinian schools of psychoanalysis. Actually more the former than the latter. What I find most ironic is that the author claims to be a Marxist feminist. But be assured there would be very few members of the striving proletariat in the gallery the author was playing to. Instead there would be a band of status seeking British upper middle class academics who wish to impose their high toned linguistic structuralist framework on Freud.
And as far as women and feminism are concerned this book wasn't written for the mass of women, more so for women from a similar social circles as the author and to keep out those women who didn't belong to this elite. Juliet Mitchell may be a woman but she's no sister.