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by Edward Kissi
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Politics & Government
  • Author:
    Edward Kissi
  • ISBN:
    0739112635
  • ISBN13:
    978-0739112632
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Lexington Books (March 21, 2006)
  • Pages:
    216 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Politics & Government
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1112 kb
  • ePUB format
    1620 kb
  • DJVU format
    1333 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    860
  • Formats:
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One of the few comparative studies of genocide in the developing world, this book presents .

One of the few comparative studies of genocide in the developing world, this book presents some of the key arguments in traditional genocide scholarship, but the book's author, Edward Kissi, takes a different position, arguing that the Cambodian genocide and the atrocious crimes in Ethiopia had very different motives.

Start by marking Revolution and Genocide in Ethiopia and Cambodia as Want to Read . This is an important and intriguing book for students of African and Asian history and those interested in the study of genocide.

Start by marking Revolution and Genocide in Ethiopia and Cambodia as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Revolution and Genocide in Ethiopia and Cambodia is the first comparative study of the Ethiopian and Cambodian revolutions of the early 1970s.

Edward Kissi's analytically stimulating Revolution and Genocide in Ethiopia and Cambodia is a fruitful comparative study probing deeply beneath surface appearances to shed new light on key differences between the revolutions in Cambodia and Ethiopia and their atrocious consequences. After reading his nuanced comparisons, no reader will ever again be satisfied with glib generalizations about the similarities between the revolutionary regimes of Pol Pot and Mengistu.

In his book, Revolution and Genocide (1992), political scientist Robert Melson pointed out that revolutionary states were the chief perpetrators of genocide in the twentieth century

In his book, Revolution and Genocide (1992), political scientist Robert Melson pointed out that revolutionary states were the chief perpetrators of genocide in the twentieth century. He included Cambodia, Ethiopia, and Rwanda in his examples of genocides that occurred in the context of revolutions accompanied by war. But Melson is careful to note that not every revolution in the twentieth century led to genocide and not every genocide in the twentieth century was the consequence of revolution. In the 1970s Ethiopians and Cambodians thought that the revolutions that took place in their society.

Revolution and Genocide in Ethiopia and Cambodia. Lanham, M. Lexington Books, 2006. xxxvi + 189 pp. Notes. Revolution and Genocide in Ethiopia and Cambodia.

However, according to Peter Gill, in his 2010 book Foreigners and Famine: Ethiopia Since Live Aid, . million people faced starvation in 1984 . Kissi, Edward (2006). Oxford: Lexington Books. million people faced starvation in 1984, resulting in over 600,000 deaths; while in 2003 1. million "faced the prospect of a famine and only 300 died. Aid money and rebel groups.

One of the few comparative studies of genocide in the developing world, this book presents some of the key argum. One of the few comparative studies of genocide in the Third World, this book presents the positions of traditional genocide scholars, but the book's author, Kissi, takes a different position, arguing that the Cambodian genocide and the Ethiopian genocide had very different motives. One of the few comparative studies of genocide in the developing world, this book presents some of the key argum.

Home Publications Revolution and Genocide in Ethiopia and Cambodia. Author(s): Edward Kissi. Publication Year: 2006. Publication Type: Book. Case Study(ies): Cambodian Genocide.

Revolution and Genocide in Ethiopia and Cambodia is the first comparative study of the Ethiopian and Cambodian revolutions of the early 1970s. One of the few comparative studies of genocide in the developing world, this book presents some of the key arguments in traditional genocide scholarship, but the book's author, Edward Kissi, takes a different position, arguing that the Cambodian genocide and the atrocious crimes in Ethiopia had very different motives.Kissi's findings reveal that genocide was a tactic specifically chosen by Cambodia's Khmer Rouge to intentionally and systematically annihilate certain ethnic and religious groups, whereas Ethiopia's Dergue resorted to terror and political killing in the effort to retain power. Revolution and Genocide in Ethiopia and Cambodia demonstrates that the extent to which revolutionary states turn to policies of genocide depends greatly on how they acquire their power and what domestic and international opposition they face. This is an important and intriguing book for students of African and Asian history and those interested in the study of genocide.