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by John C. Cross
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Politics & Government
  • Author:
    John C. Cross
  • ISBN:
    0804730601
  • ISBN13:
    978-0804730600
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Stanford University Press; 1 edition (July 1, 1998)
  • Pages:
    284 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Politics & Government
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1807 kb
  • ePUB format
    1247 kb
  • DJVU format
    1240 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    280
  • Formats:
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John C. Cross, Informal Politics: Street Vendors and the State in Mexico City, (Standford, California, Stanford University Press, 1998) as quoted in WOMEN AND MEN IN THE INFORMAL ECONOMY : A statistical picture (PDF), International Labour Organization, 2002.

John C. php?title Street vendors in Mexico City&oldid 909406024". Categories: Retailing in Mexico City.

Street vendors have been successful in defending their interests in Mexico City, the author argues, because they are . The book develops a systematic theory of the political economy of economic informality while raising new questions and theories about the state and social movements.

Street vendors have been successful in defending their interests in Mexico City, the author argues, because they are able to take advantage of certain structural features of the Mexican state, notably the weak integration of interests between policy-makers and policy-implementers.

Informal Politics book. As economic crises struck the Third World in the 1970s and 1980s, large. Street vendors have been successful in defending their interests in Mexico City, the author argues, because they are able to take advantage of certain structural features of the Mexican state, notably the weak integration of interests between policy-makers and policy-implementers. The author shows that when well-organized, street vendors can collude with state policy-implementers even when state policy-makers are influenced by powerful interest groups, such as large national and multinational corporations.

Home Browse Books Book details, Informal Politics: Street Vendors and the State. I first became interested in the informal economy while living in Mexico City from 1983 to 1984. Informal Politics: Street Vendors and the State in Mexico City. Members of my wife's family were involved in street vending and craft work, and I had many acquaintances who also were involved in one way or another. At this time, in the economic crisis of the early 1980's, it was patently clear that the "formal" economy was far from efficient. Wages were low, work conditions were poor, and key goods were at times hard to come by.

The book develops a systematic theory of the "political economy of economic informality while raising new .

The book develops a systematic theory of the "political economy of economic informality while raising new questions and theories about the state and social movements.

Street Vendors as Political Actors. Street Vendors as Political Actors The book, while carefully limiting its claims to the informal sector in Mexico City, should be of interest to scholars interested in urban dynamics in other. Street Vendors as Political Actors. The book, while carefully limiting its claims to the informal sector in Mexico City, should be of interest to scholars interested in urban dynamics in other parts of the world. Indeed, much more attention is needed to the political and organizational dynamics of workers in the informal sector.

Street vendor organizations in Mexico City are used as a case study to address

Street vendor organizations in Mexico City are used as a case study to address. the question posed above. This article is divided into "ve sections. ways can be found in which both the state and social institutions are engaged. Street vendor organizations in Mexico City are used as a case study to analyze the. role and function of informal institutions. Case studies of this nature provide. classi"es informal markets where street vendors operate as shown in Table 1.

Cross J. Palo Alto: Stanford University Press; 1998. Davis D. Irregular armed forces, shifting patterns of commitment, and fragmented sovereignty in the developing world. Kjellén M, & McGranahan G. Informal water vendors and the urban poor (human settlements discussion paper series human settlements discussion paper series theme: Water-3 no. 978-1-84369-586-8). London: International Institute for Environment and Development; 2006.

Journal of Latin American Studies "The book provides an often fascinating look into the politics surrounding street vending in Mexico City. - Library Journal Added to basket.

As economic crises struck the Third World in the 1970s and 1980s, large segments of the population turned to the informal economy to survive. Though this phenomenon has previously been analyzed from a strictly economic point of view, this book looks at street vending in the largest city in the world, Mexico City, as a political process. Employing a street-level analysis based on intensive participant observation, with interviews, archival research, and surveys, the author presents a view of political processes that provides new theoretical insights into social movements, state institutions, and politics at the fringe of society, where legality blurs into illegality and the informal economy intersects with its political counterpoint―informal politics. By studying political processes at the street level and then tracing them up the political structure, the author also reveals the basic processes by which the Mexican state operates. Street vendors have been successful in defending their interests in Mexico City, the author argues, because they are able to take advantage of certain structural features of the Mexican state, notably the weak integration of interests between policy-makers and policy-implementers. The author shows that when well-organized, street vendors can collude with state policy-implementers even when state policy-makers are influenced by powerful interest groups, such as large national and multinational corporations. The book develops a systematic theory of the “political economy of economic informality” while raising new questions and theories about the state and social movements. Though the direct research is confined to the Mexican case study, the author suggests ways in which his conclusions can be applied to other developing areas in the Third World.